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Smarck Michel

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October 25, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Smarck Michel, a wealthy businessman who originally rejected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide's nomination as prime minister, has accepted a second offer after being assured he would have a free hand to direct a free-market economic program, U.S. and Haitian sources said Monday. "It was settled finally this morning," a senior U.S. official said after reports circulated that Aristide would submit Michel's name to the Parliament today.
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NEWS
October 25, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Smarck Michel, a wealthy businessman who originally rejected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide's nomination as prime minister, has accepted a second offer after being assured he would have a free hand to direct a free-market economic program, U.S. and Haitian sources said Monday. "It was settled finally this morning," a senior U.S. official said after reports circulated that Aristide would submit Michel's name to the Parliament today.
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NEWS
October 24, 1995 | From Times Wire Reports
President Jean-Bertrand Aristide has picked Foreign Minister Claudette Werleigh to become Haiti's first female prime minister. Werleigh, 49, is to replace Smarck Michel, who resigned Oct. 16 over widespread opposition to his economic reforms. Chamber of Deputies President Fritz Robert St. Paul said Monday that Aristide picked Werleigh after consulting with leaders of both houses of Parliament. Her appointment is not expected to encounter opposition from lawmakers, who must approve it.
NEWS
November 9, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prime Minister Smarck Michel assumed office at a ceremony in which he played down high hopes and asked for the patience of his long-suffering countrymen. "I want to thank the Haitian people for their patience, and I hope I do not disappoint them," Michel said in a brief speech. Michel was appointed by President Jean-Bertrand Aristide after he was restored to power last month with the backing of the U.S. military.
NEWS
October 24, 1995 | Associated Press
President Jean-Bertrand Aristide has picked Foreign Minister Claudette Werleigh to become Haiti's first female prime minister. Werleigh, 49, is to replace Smarck Michel, who resigned Oct. 16 over widespread opposition to his economic reforms. Chamber of Deputies President Fritz Robert St. Paul said Monday that Aristide picked Werleigh after consulting Sunday with leaders of both houses of Parliament. Her appointment is not expected to encounter opposition from lawmakers, who must approve it.
NEWS
December 26, 1994 | Associated Press
Fights broke out among 1,500 children waiting for refreshments at a Christmas Day party thrown by Jean-Bertrand Aristide at the Presidential Palace. The children grew restless as they waited for the president, who was scheduled to greet them at 3 p.m. but didn't emerge from the palace until 6. Aristide appeared at the top of the palace steps and spoke briefly using a microphone before returning inside.
NEWS
November 8, 1994 | From Associated Press
Parliament's lower house overwhelmingly endorsed President Jean-Bertrand Aristide's new government in a vote of confidence late Monday night. A swearing-in ceremony for Prime Minister Smarck Michel and his 17-member Cabinet was scheduled for today at the Presidential Palace. The Cabinet's task will be to restore elected rule after three years of military repression.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1995
This week marked the first anniversary of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide's return to power. So far, Aristide has exceeded international expectations. He has toned down his anti-capitalist rhetoric, disbanded an army filled with thugs, nurtured a civilian police force and overseen imperfect but reasonably fair elections. Now, he must fully embrace privatization and trim government bloat in order to get at least $1 billion in foreign aid from the United States and other sources.
NEWS
October 30, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an urgent speech aimed at rural Haitians and boat people in exile, President Jean-Bertrand Aristide appealed Saturday for peace in Haiti's countryside, where human rights groups report continued beatings and killings of civilians. Speaking on national television and radio from the dining room table of his heavily guarded home, Aristide called on the more than 550 rural "section chiefs"--once the enforcers of Haiti's military regime--to put down their weapons and stop attacking the peasants.
NEWS
November 4, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a whirlwind two-day tour of Haiti that included an emotional appearance by President Jean-Bertrand Aristide on the streets of the capital, President Clinton's national security adviser said Thursday that there is no specific timetable for withdrawing the U.S. military intervention force from Haiti.
NEWS
November 3, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. combat troops took up sniper positions atop tombs Wednesday to guard President Jean-Bertrand Aristide as the former exile ventured out for a rare public visit--kneeling at a cemetery and two churches to pray for Haitian priests, politicians and thousands of others who died for him and his democratic cause under three years of military rule.
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