Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSmart
IN THE NEWS

Smart

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1998 | Robert Hofler, Robert Hofler is an editor for Variety in Los Angeles
Maybe it's in the genes. Minnie Driver's sister, Kate, is just as outspoken--in her own behind-the-scenes kind of way--as her famous actress sibling. "Minnie's opened herself up to situations where she should never have gotten herself," Kate says straight out. Is she talking about her sister's tabloid blowout with former boyfriend Matt Damon or perhaps Driver's disclosure to the press that the "Hard Rain" crew had turned the set's water tank into a mega-urinal? Whatever.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 22, 2014 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Could an Opening Ceremony store be coming to every city in the land? Humberto Leon and Carol Lim, founders of the influential retailer and its eponymous private label, announced plans on Tuesday to accelerate growth after scoring a minority investment from Boston-based private equity firm Berkshire Partners . The new capital will be used to “enhance its Opening Ceremony women's, men's and accessories collections and its e-commerce capabilities,...
Advertisement
SPORTS
February 28, 2009
I don't know whether to be more pleased at the Ducks for already agreeing to freeze next season's prices for all tickets, food, drinks and parking or more upset at the Kings for failing to do the same. Kings chief marketing officer Chris McGowan admitted that "In these economic times it's good that an organization can do that type of thing. It's pretty smart." The Kings haven't made the playoffs since 2002, they refuse to match the Ducks' offer and they are requiring current season-seat holders to renew by March 31, before the regular season even ends.
OPINION
April 16, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
When the city of Los Angeles established its "1% for the Arts" program more than two decades ago, the rationale was that commercial and municipal development takes a toll on the visual landscape of the city. To mitigate that, and to contribute to the artistic vitality of the city, developers were required to pay a fee equal to 1% of the construction value. That money was supposed to pay for art in public places. It was a smart idea to set up the Arts Development Fee Trust Fund. But it's dumb not to spend it. A recent audit by City Controller Ron Galperin found that $7.5 million was languishing in the portion of the fund that is bankrolled by developers and earmarked for public art projects, cultural events and performances.
IMAGE
March 21, 2010 | By Victoria Namkung, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Echo Park's Clare Vivier is having a moment. L.A. designer Jasmin Shokrian just collaborated with her, the always-stylish Rashida Jones is a regular client and Target's Red Hot Shop website recently sold out 200 of her fold-over clutches in a matter of days. The ClareVivier handbag collection, produced entirely in L.A., is winning fans with a mix of Parisian flair and timeless design. Popular styles include La Tropézienne, an eco tanned Italian leather bag; a slouchy messenger tote made of unlined nubuck leather and soft metallic flat work totes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson
Daniel Melnick, a producer and former head of production at MGM and Columbia studios who was known for making bold, literate and carefully crafted films that included "Network," "All That Jazz" and "Roxanne," has died. He was 77. Melnick, who had recently undergone surgery for lung cancer, died Tuesday of multiple ailments at his home in Los Angeles, said his son, Peter. "He was an extraordinary producer and an extraordinary executive," Sherry Lansing, a former studio executive whom Melnick mentored, told The Times on Wednesday.
OPINION
March 24, 2009
Re "Geithner can still pay off for Obama," Opinion, March 22 We are told to be patient with Timothy F. Geithner because he's a smart guy and we need smart guys because everything connected with finance is oh-so-complicated. But perhaps he's just a little too smart for his own -- and our own -- good. Remember, it was smart guys who got us into this mess. Any time these smart finance guys talk about large sums of money and complications, we know we're being swindled. Any time these guys tell you that $165 million is a drop in the bucket, we know someone is making off with a bundle.
MAGAZINE
February 2, 1992
It's incredible that in this day and age people will waste their money and even risk their health on questionable "brain boosters," especially since there is no conclusive proof that they do indeed enhance brainpower ("Smart as You Wanna Be," by Jeff Greenwald, Dec. 22). My advice on how to effectively and safely increase intelligence is to do it the old-fashioned way, through hard work, studying and reading a wide range of books. Like any other worthwhile pursuit, there's no shortcut to being smart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Jason Wells
Urbanites have apparently found an answer to rural California's long nefarious history of cow-tipping. A group of men in San Francisco have allegedly taken to car-tipping. Three Smart cars were "tipped over" late Sunday or early Monday, local media reported. The pint-sized, two-door coupes were either set on their hind quarters or tipped completely over. The feat of upending a car listed at roughly 1,800 pounds may take more muscle than merely pushing over a snoozing cow, but the vandals also appeared to know what they were doing, according to one witness.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2009 | Nicholas Riccardi
For the first time since her 2002 abduction by a self-proclaimed religious prophet captured worldwide attention, Elizabeth Smart spoke publicly about her ordeal today, testifying in federal court that Brian David Mitchell repeatedly invoked religion to justify sexually abusing her for months. Testifying in a hearing to determine whether Mitchell is mentally competent to face federal kidnapping charges, Smart, now 21, calmly detailed nine months of being shackled and repeatedly raped.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Robert Abele
Two psychologically damaged siblings doing battle with a mysterious home furnishing makes for nervy moviegoing in the housebound chiller "Oculus. " The object in question is the Lasser Glass, an ornate, antique black cedar mirror of historically malevolent intentions, or so believes Kaylie (Karen Gillan), whose parents met a bloody, psychotic end a decade ago. Her younger, more emotionally fragile brother Tim (Brenton Thwaites), fresh from a mental facility, is less sure of sis' theory and more intent on moving on from the tragedy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | Lee Romney
This city likes to consider itself a trendsetter. And the excited response to the furtive tipping of four diminutive Smart cars early Monday morning just may have succeeded in sparking a trend. Police believe a single group of six to eight "individuals" in black hoodies was responsible for placing all four of the tiny eco-friendly cars on their sides, roofs or back ends beginning at 1 a.m. Three of the incidents occurred in the increasingly costly -- in keeping with other San Francisco trends -- neighborhood of Bernal Heights.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Ever since Charles Darwin made his way to the Galapagos, we've heard a lot about that fateful moment when some previously water-bound creature pulled itself up from the slowly receding seas, took a breath and began the eons-long march to humanity. What we didn't know was what that creature looked like and how, specifically, it relates to us. Based on the bestselling book of the same name, "Your Inner Fish" is a six-hour, three-part documentary determined to do just that. Paleontologist and evolutionary biologist Neil Shubin, who wrote the book and hosts the series, is infectiously enthusiastic as he takes viewers on a tour of the human anatomy, its unexpected roots (subsequent episodes cover our inner reptile and our inner monkey)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Jason Wells
The hunt is on in San Francisco for vandals who have now tipped over four Smart cars over the past 48 hours. Three of the pint-sized cars were discovered upended late Monday or early Sunday. A fourth was found on its side later Monday morning. The vandals -- described by a witness to one car-tipping incident as a group of eight people wearing hooded sweatshirts -- remain at large, with little more for police investigators to go on. PHOTOS: Smart car tipping spree "All we have right now are multiple suspects wearing black hooded sweatshirts," San Francisco police Officer Gordon Shyy told KGO-TV.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By A Times Staff Writer
San Francisco police are investigating after witnesses reported that a group of men tipped over three Smart cars late Sunday or early Monday. “I thought it looked like they were up to no good and then sure enough they walk up to this Smart car right here, all huddle around it, and then life it up and set it on its hind legs,” resident Brandon Michael told CBS San Francisco. The pint-sized, two-door coupes were either set on their hind quarters or tipped completely over. The feat of upending a car listed at roughly 1,800 pounds may take more muscle than merely pushing over a snoozing cow, but the vandals also appeared to know what they were doing, according to one witness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Jason Wells
Urbanites have apparently found an answer to rural California's long nefarious history of cow-tipping. A group of men in San Francisco have allegedly taken to car-tipping. Three Smart cars were "tipped over" late Sunday or early Monday, local media reported. The pint-sized, two-door coupes were either set on their hind quarters or tipped completely over. The feat of upending a car listed at roughly 1,800 pounds may take more muscle than merely pushing over a snoozing cow, but the vandals also appeared to know what they were doing, according to one witness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1995
Let's return Street Smart to its original purpose of questions and answers from readers. It served a much more useful function than the present fluff articles that may make the reporter feel good. RON KESSLER North Hollywood
BUSINESS
August 13, 1989
When I read Harry Bernstein's labor column of Aug. 1, "Many Americans Share Miners' Problem," I was dismayed to find that untruths, half-truths and innuendoes had been so freely used to attack Smart & Final Iris Corp. and falsely portray the facts and circumstances of its current labor situation. Bernstein never requested comment from either myself or, to my knowledge, any other Smart & Final representative. Had he done so, he would have been provided the following information contradicting the "facts" presented: First, Smart & Final never "refused to continue paying health-care premiums for retirees."
SPORTS
March 30, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
For more than two decades, the West Coast has played the part of Major League Baseball's strange uncle. You know, the one who is invited to the family reunion but hardly ever gets to sit at the head table. In the last 22 seasons, only three teams west of the Rockies - the team and the mountain range - have won a World Series. In 17 of those seasons, a team from the Pacific time zone didn't even advance to the game's biggest showcase. However, the tide may be turning. In the National League, San Francisco has won two of the last three championships and the Dodgers, with the game's highest payroll and best pitcher in 26-year-old Clayton Kershaw, seem poised to begin a dynasty.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
There is something both touching and irritating about Justin Halpern's dogged determination to build a career out of his father's matter-of-fact insights and profane lyricism. Halpern, you will remember, was one of the first to prove that Twitter could lead to Bigger Things - in 2009, just months after he began posting his father's salty sayings, Halpern had a contract for a book. This led to a television show called "$#*! My Dad Says" that starred fellow Twitter star William Shatner.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|