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Smart Cards

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BUSINESS
September 12, 2000 | Edmund Sanders
Some of the nation's top credit card issuers are expected to announce shortly that they plan to issue chip-embedded "smart cards" to provide their customers with new services, particularly while shopping on the Internet. FleetBoston Financial will unveil its smart-card program today, company executives said. Last year, American Express became the first U.S. credit card issuer to offer smart cards.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
February 4, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The blockbuster theft of credit card data from Target during the holiday shopping rush was just one example of the way outdated cards are leaving Americans more vulnerable to fraud and identity theft than shoppers are in other developed countries. The good news is that the credit card industry is in the process of fixing part of the problem. The bad news is that squabbling among retailers, banks and payment processors is getting in the way of a more complete solution. The United States is one of the few remaining places where credit and debit cards rely on a magnetic stripe, rather than a microchip, to store and transmit account information.
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TRAVEL
June 23, 2013 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
Question: I read with interest the articles concerning the use of magnetic stripe and Chip and PIN cards in Europe and, as a result, have just obtained a Chip and PIN card. The customer service representative added one caveat: "Bad guys" in Europe have a device that can read the PIN from some distance from the location of the transaction and can then fraudulently use it for their own purposes. She strongly advised the purchase of a protective sleeve that can thwart this illegal use. Albert P. Taylor North Tustin Answer: Every transaction carries some risk, security experts agree, but the agent seems to have conflated a couple of security concerns.
NEWS
November 5, 2013 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
The Chase Sapphire Preferred credit card is joining the ranks of the smart-card set later this month when it becomes available with a chip. The card will continue to have a magnetic stripe -- the standard most often used in the U.S, in which the card is swiped, then the receipt signed to complete a transaction. However, the new card also will have an embedded computer chip, the standard used in much of the world. The new cards will still require a signature; they are, not surprisingly, called chip-and-signature cards.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Motorola Inc. said it has created a business unit to produce smart cards, devices about the size of credit cards that contain personal and financial information. Motorola is already the leading provider of microprocessors for smart cards. Its new unit will expand into producing the cards themselves, the products that read them and encryption technology to safeguard the information.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1998
One of the things that made "smart cards" popular in Europe was the fact that before smart card readers were widely available at most retailers, they were everywhere else ["E-Commerce May Help Americans Learn to Love Smart Cards," Oct. 11]. Every possible vending machine had them, pay phones had them, virtually any pay-as-you-go utility device had them. Europeans were sold on convenience, and this was aided, as mentioned in the article, by standardization. Smart cards enabled another type of convenience that had been unknown in Europe until the emergence of such cards: the ability to easily go from one country to another without having to convert large amounts of cash.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1985 | S. J. DIAMOND
Just as we're all struggling to grasp the idea of debit cards and home banking, they tell us that "smart cards" are coming, moving us further toward tellerless, paperless, bankless financial transactions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2000 | CATHERINE BLAKE
How smart is a Smart Card? Tonight's speaker at the World Affairs Council of Ventura County will provide an answer while discussing the plastic, wallet-sized cards during a meeting beginning at 7:30 at the Cal State Northridge satellite campus in Camarillo. "The presentation will be about the little credit cards with computers in them," said Nathan Pratt, chairman of the council, which is sponsoring the talk. "And how they have taken over in Europe and are now coming to America."
BUSINESS
March 4, 2004 | From Reuters
Retailing giant Target Corp. is phasing out computer chips on its Target Visa cards due to limited shopper use, dealing a setback to proponents of "smart card" technology. Target announced the move Tuesday, less than three years after it introduced the cards. The technology allowed cardholders to download discount "coupons" from the Internet or in-store kiosks onto the cards, then use the coupons in Target stores.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1996 | JENNIFER OLDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the most ambitious and important technology events at the Atlanta Olympics this month will be Visa's smart-card project--the first large-scale experiment with cash card technology in this country. Visa will issue about 2 million cash cards, which, unlike traditional credit cards, each contain a microprocessor chip storing a specific cash value.
TRAVEL
June 23, 2013 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
Question: I read with interest the articles concerning the use of magnetic stripe and Chip and PIN cards in Europe and, as a result, have just obtained a Chip and PIN card. The customer service representative added one caveat: "Bad guys" in Europe have a device that can read the PIN from some distance from the location of the transaction and can then fraudulently use it for their own purposes. She strongly advised the purchase of a protective sleeve that can thwart this illegal use. Albert P. Taylor North Tustin Answer: Every transaction carries some risk, security experts agree, but the agent seems to have conflated a couple of security concerns.
TRAVEL
May 12, 2013
Question: We are planning a trip to London and have heard that some of our charge and credit cards may not be accepted because they are not Chip and PIN. If that's so, what are our choices? We don't want to carry a load of cash. Nancy Jones Claremont Answer: This was going to be such an easy answer. I'd just direct Jones to Travelex, which had a Chip and PIN (personal identification number) card, and that would be the end of it. The Travelex card would be a backup, because many places overseas can accept U.S. cards that have a magnetic stripe.
NATIONAL
March 22, 2009 | Bob Drogin
As owners of one of the oldest ferry services in America, Tom and Judy Bixler steer their craft across the narrow Tred Avon River dozens of times each summer day to link two sleepy Chesapeake Bay towns known for crabs, not jihadists. "The ferry goes pretty slowly," Judy Bixler said of the seasonal service, which dates back to 1683. "It's not like someone could commandeer it and go anywhere." But under a little-known domestic security program, the Bixlers and about 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2006 | Jean Guccione, Times Staff Writer
Imagine getting on a bus without having to fumble for exact change or wait behind somebody trying to stuff crumpled dollar bills into the fare box. Consider transferring from the subway onto a bus operated by the city of Long Beach or another municipal transit agency using the same prepaid pass. For Wally Shidler, the fantasy has begun: He simply taps his new transit "smart card" every time he boards the Blue Line or gets on a Metro bus.
TRAVEL
July 16, 2006
REGARDING James Gilden's article "New 'Chip and PIN' Credit May Cause Confusion Overseas" [Travel Insider, July 9], I called Citi Card since we are leaving on a three-week trip to Sweden, Finland and Russia next week. I had requested new cards two weeks ago and received them. At the time, I had inquired about "smart cards," and they seemed to know nothing about them. After reading the article, I called again. After being transferred to several representatives, I finally got someone who was able to minimally answer my question.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
A U.S. appeals court panel upheld a Federal Communications Commission decision to hold AT&T Inc. liable for as much as $553 million in fees on prepaid calling cards. The three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington denied AT&T's petition to review the FCC's decision from last year. The court ruling allows telephone carriers and the government to pursue San Antonio-based AT&T to recover fees and access charges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2002 | CLAIRE LUNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A single prepaid fare card will let riders use any county bus and rail system by September 2003, transit officials said Monday. Los Angeles County's Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Metrolink and 17 municipal bus operations have agreed to honor a "smart card" to increase ridership and convenience for public transit users, officials said. Customers will be able to use the same wallet-size card on buses and commuter trains from Santa Monica to San Dimas. San Diego-based Cubic Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1993 | JON NALICK
The Santa Ana Unified School District on Monday kicked off its innovative Smart Card program, designed to help students get jobs as well as improve their academic performance. Billed as the first program of its kind in the nation, Smart Card offers high school students laminated plastic cards that display their academic, attendance and citizenship records. When students apply for jobs, they can use the card as a kind of resume and letter of recommendation, said district Supt. Rudy M.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2006 | From Reuters
U.S. Treasury officials are planning a crackdown on so-called prepaid cards, an increasingly popular payment instrument, to help safeguard the financial system from a surge in money laundering and other crimes including terrorist financing. The officials outlined plans for a regulatory clampdown on the instruments, also known as stored-value cards, at an anti-money-laundering conference in Hollywood, Fla.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
An AT&T Corp. executive said Friday that Federal Communications Commission staff would recommend the company be cited for failing to pay as much as $500 million in fees on use of prepaid calling cards. AT&T says the cards should be exempt from the fees. But FCC staff members disagree, said Robert Quinn, an AT&T vice president who handles government relations.
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