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NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Jon Healey
Here's one aspect of Steve Jobs' legacy that Tim Cook, his successor at the helm of Apple, must be hating Wednesday: the company's reputation for lowballing its sales and profit estimates. The company found itself in the odd position of reporting better results than it had projected -- and, more objectively, higher quarterly sales and profits than the year before -- yet having its stock hammered in after-hours trading. Why? Because analysts had predicted much higher sales and profits, and thus were surprised and disappointed.
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BUSINESS
March 3, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
Boeing Co., the aerospace giant that makes fighter jets, airliners and satellites, is now looking at getting into the cell phone business. The Chicago company said it has developed an ultra-secure smartphone that's marketed toward U.S. defense and security communities. Few details have been released. What is known is the Boeing Black smartphone runs off an Android operating system, contains encrypted storage for sensitive data and has a self-destruct mode. If someone tries to pop open the device, it is automatically wiped of its data and made inoperable.
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BUSINESS
March 3, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
Boeing Co., the aerospace giant that makes fighter jets, airliners and satellites, is now looking at getting into the cell phone business. The Chicago company said it has developed an ultra-secure smartphone that's marketed toward U.S. defense and security communities. Few details have been released. What is known is the Boeing Black smartphone runs off an Android operating system, contains encrypted storage for sensitive data and has a self-destruct mode. If someone tries to pop open the device, it is automatically wiped of its data and made inoperable.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google on Monday disclosed its first major acquisition of 2014, announcing it has purchased Nest, a startup that sells connected home products, for $3.2 billion in cash. Nest was co-founded by Tony Fadell, one of the people who led Apple's creation of the iPod in the early 2000s. Nest has been around for a few years and sells a smart thermostat and a smart smoke and carbon monoxide alarm that users can control using apps on their smartphones. Nest is "already delivering amazing products you can buy right now -- thermostats that save energy and smoke/CO alarms that can help keep your family safe," Google CEO Larry Page said in a statement . "We are excited to bring great experiences to more homes in more countries and fulfill their dreams!
BUSINESS
January 13, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google on Monday disclosed its first major acquisition of 2014, announcing it has purchased Nest, a startup that sells connected home products, for $3.2 billion in cash. Nest was co-founded by Tony Fadell, one of the people who led Apple's creation of the iPod in the early 2000s. Nest has been around for a few years and sells a smart thermostat and a smart smoke and carbon monoxide alarm that users can control using apps on their smartphones. Nest is "already delivering amazing products you can buy right now -- thermostats that save energy and smoke/CO alarms that can help keep your family safe," Google CEO Larry Page said in a statement . "We are excited to bring great experiences to more homes in more countries and fulfill their dreams!
BUSINESS
September 2, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Microsoft announced Monday that it would acquire Nokia's mobile phone business in the latest blockbuster news that signals a massive transformation of the tech giant.  Just two weeks ago, the company revealed that Chief Executive Steve Ballmer would retire in the next 12 months. Last week, Microsoft said it had struck a deal with an activist investor, seeming to indicate the company was under pressure to revamp its business.  The deal with Nokia would do just that. It would push Microsoft even further from its roots as a software company to become the "devices and services" company that Ballmer has discussed in recent months.  "We are excited and honored to be bringing Nokia's incredible people, technologies and assets into our Microsoft family.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2013 | By Andrew Khouri and Andrea Chang
For Raffi Kajberouni, the keys to his Santa Clarita home have become relics. If he locks himself out, no problem. If a friend arrives at his two-story house before him, there's no waiting outside for Kajberouni to arrive. Kajberouni taps his smartphone and his front door unlocks. He can also turn down the thermostat or view his home security cameras from anywhere in the world. "A lot of my friends are jealous," the 31-year-old said. "It's like the home from 'Back to the Future,' but in real life.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2000 | STANLEY HOLMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates preached the wonders of "smart" personal computing devices that can link up with the home of the future by demonstrating some new gadgets at the Consumer Electronics Show here on Wednesday. Gates displayed Microsoft's new Pocket PC, which includes a mini Web browser that can receive and send e-mail, as well as display video programming downloaded from Microsoft's interactive WebTV service.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
As a Cobra attack helicopter pilot, Marine Capt. Jim "Hottie" Carlson was running support missions above Afghanistan last summer when it occurred to him that it was taking far too long to find where U.S. troops were under attack. "Do you have any idea how long it takes to find the right map, unfold it, and find where you're going? It's agonizing," he said. Frustrated that he had to flip through dozens of maps stuffed inside his chopper, Carlson, 31, loaded the documents onto his personal iPad, enabling him to zoom in, zoom out and quickly move from one map to another.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Hewlett-Packard Co., the world's largest maker of printers and personal computers, agreed Wednesday to buy privately owned Bitfone Corp. to add software used to control mobile e-mail to its product line. Laguna Niguel-based Bitfone, which has about 130 employees, makes software that companies use to configure cellphones and other devices to ensure that they work with corporate e-mail systems, Hewlett-Packard said. Terms for the purchase weren't disclosed.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2013 | By Andrew Khouri and Andrea Chang
For Raffi Kajberouni, the keys to his Santa Clarita home have become relics. If he locks himself out, no problem. If a friend arrives at his two-story house before him, there's no waiting outside for Kajberouni to arrive. Kajberouni taps his smartphone and his front door unlocks. He can also turn down the thermostat or view his home security cameras from anywhere in the world. "A lot of my friends are jealous," the 31-year-old said. "It's like the home from 'Back to the Future,' but in real life.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Microsoft announced Monday that it would acquire Nokia's mobile phone business in the latest blockbuster news that signals a massive transformation of the tech giant.  Just two weeks ago, the company revealed that Chief Executive Steve Ballmer would retire in the next 12 months. Last week, Microsoft said it had struck a deal with an activist investor, seeming to indicate the company was under pressure to revamp its business.  The deal with Nokia would do just that. It would push Microsoft even further from its roots as a software company to become the "devices and services" company that Ballmer has discussed in recent months.  "We are excited and honored to be bringing Nokia's incredible people, technologies and assets into our Microsoft family.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Jon Healey
Here's one aspect of Steve Jobs' legacy that Tim Cook, his successor at the helm of Apple, must be hating Wednesday: the company's reputation for lowballing its sales and profit estimates. The company found itself in the odd position of reporting better results than it had projected -- and, more objectively, higher quarterly sales and profits than the year before -- yet having its stock hammered in after-hours trading. Why? Because analysts had predicted much higher sales and profits, and thus were surprised and disappointed.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
As a Cobra attack helicopter pilot, Marine Capt. Jim "Hottie" Carlson was running support missions above Afghanistan last summer when it occurred to him that it was taking far too long to find where U.S. troops were under attack. "Do you have any idea how long it takes to find the right map, unfold it, and find where you're going? It's agonizing," he said. Frustrated that he had to flip through dozens of maps stuffed inside his chopper, Carlson, 31, loaded the documents onto his personal iPad, enabling him to zoom in, zoom out and quickly move from one map to another.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2000 | STANLEY HOLMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates preached the wonders of "smart" personal computing devices that can link up with the home of the future by demonstrating some new gadgets at the Consumer Electronics Show here on Wednesday. Gates displayed Microsoft's new Pocket PC, which includes a mini Web browser that can receive and send e-mail, as well as display video programming downloaded from Microsoft's interactive WebTV service.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Military mobile apps may one day help soldiers on the battlefield. Engineers and researchers at Boeing Co. and MIT have developed an iPhone application to fly a miniature drone rotorcraft from some 3,000 miles away. It just takes a few taps and swipes of the operator's finger in Seattle to make a drone at a baseball field on the MIT campus in Cambridge, Mass., start to hover, rotate and zip around. "These applications could allow [drones] to be used more effectively for tasks that are dirty or dangerous, as well as for missions that may be too long and tedious to have a human be continuously at the controls," the company said on its website.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Motorola Inc. said it has created a business unit to produce smart cards, devices about the size of credit cards that contain personal and financial information. Motorola is already the leading provider of microprocessors for smart cards. Its new unit will expand into producing the cards themselves, the products that read them and encryption technology to safeguard the information.
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