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Smart Drugs

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NEWS
May 10, 1992 | PATRICIA BIBBY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
At the end of "The Wizard of Oz," the Scarecrow discovers that he has the brain he wanted. He is able to reel off a complicated mathematical equation after simply being handed a diploma. Would that it were so easy. Well, how would you like to get smarter merely by popping a pill? Or by knocking back a fruit-flavored drink with a name such as "IQ Booster"?
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HEALTH
February 19, 2001 | LAURAN NEERGAARD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The man squints at his medication, but his dimming vision can't make out even whether he picked up the Coumadin or Celebrex. So he aims a gadget the size of a deck of cards at the bottle, and a computerized voice begins reading his prescription instructions. Call them talking drugs. If pilot testing goes well at two Chicago hospitals, blind and elderly Americans could soon begin buying prescriptions with "smart labels" that read aloud the potentially lifesaving fine print.
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NEWS
August 25, 1992 | JODI DUCKETT, HARTFORD COURANT
The term smart drug or smart nutrient is used to apply to any product or compound made from naturally occurring or manufactured ingredients that is believed to stimulate the brain in such a way that a person can become more alert and energetic. The word smart is used almost as a slogan. Researchers generally agree that basic intelligence cannot be greatly influenced, or influenced at all, by taking drugs or nutrients.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | ANTHONY DEUTSCH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Want extra mushrooms on that? They'll get to your house as fast as a Domino's pizza. But these mushrooms aren't pie toppings. They're hallucinogens, the latest Dutch treat in this country famously tolerant of "soft drugs." Staying one step ahead of the law, a shop in this quiet eastern town is offering home delivery of herbal ecstasy, organic "designer drugs" and at least 600 other mind-expanding and mood-enhancing substances, including psychedelic mushrooms.
MAGAZINE
February 2, 1992
I am concerned about the tone of Jeff Greenwald's article, in that the casual reader may conclude that all "smart drugs" are safe. Competent adults, of course, ought to have the right to patronize "smart lounges" and imbibe smart drugs, just as they have the freedom to indulge in dumb ones, like alcohol and nicotine. They should also be adequately warned of possible complications. Two of the smart drugs mentioned by Greenwald trouble me the most: vasopressin and Dilantin. Both, in my opinion, should be taken only under strict medical and laboratory supervision as their unmonitored consumption may lead to serious or fatal consequences.
MAGAZINE
December 22, 1991 | JEFF GREENWALD, Jeff Greenwald's most recent book, "Shopping for Buddhas," was published by Harper San Francisco. He reported on Chinese labor camps in the June 16 issue of the Times Magazine
AT 2 O'CLOCK ON A SUMMER MORNING, THE Smart Lounge pulsed like a human brain. Flashes of light strobed through the cavelike cellar, and computer-generated music throbbed from enormous speakers. Mobiles and Day-Glo planets hung from the ceiling, dancing in the air currents like elusive thoughts.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | ANTHONY DEUTSCH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Want extra mushrooms on that? They'll get to your house as fast as a Domino's pizza. But these mushrooms aren't pie toppings. They're hallucinogens, the latest Dutch treat in this country famously tolerant of "soft drugs." Staying one step ahead of the law, a shop in this quiet eastern town is offering home delivery of herbal ecstasy, organic "designer drugs" and at least 600 other mind-expanding and mood-enhancing substances, including psychedelic mushrooms.
NEWS
May 21, 1989 | Elliott Almond \f7
In 1966, John Griggs robbed a man of LSD at gunpoint, according to a former friend's testimony before a grand jury. The act dramatically changed Griggs' life. A week later, Glen Lynd testified in 1973 before the Orange County Grand Jury, Griggs experimented with the LSD, "threw away his gun and was running around hollering, 'This is it.' That's how it all began." Lynd in 1973 was describing the origins of the Laguna Beach-based Brotherhood of Eternal Love, which by then was alleged to be an international drug ring.
HEALTH
February 19, 2001 | LAURAN NEERGAARD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The man squints at his medication, but his dimming vision can't make out even whether he picked up the Coumadin or Celebrex. So he aims a gadget the size of a deck of cards at the bottle, and a computerized voice begins reading his prescription instructions. Call them talking drugs. If pilot testing goes well at two Chicago hospitals, blind and elderly Americans could soon begin buying prescriptions with "smart labels" that read aloud the potentially lifesaving fine print.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The key word in Iara Lee's ambitious but often tedious documentary "Synthetic Pleasures" is control: control over the environment, the mind and the body, over the life span itself. This, Lee suggests, is manifesting itself in myriad ways: virtual reality, cyber-sex, cryonics, biotechnology, artificial intelligence, the Internet, smart drugs. The list goes on and on. And that's a problem: Lee spreads herself too thin.
NEWS
August 25, 1992 | JODI DUCKETT, HARTFORD COURANT
The term smart drug or smart nutrient is used to apply to any product or compound made from naturally occurring or manufactured ingredients that is believed to stimulate the brain in such a way that a person can become more alert and energetic. The word smart is used almost as a slogan. Researchers generally agree that basic intelligence cannot be greatly influenced, or influenced at all, by taking drugs or nutrients.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | PATRICIA BIBBY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
At the end of "The Wizard of Oz," the Scarecrow discovers that he has the brain he wanted. He is able to reel off a complicated mathematical equation after simply being handed a diploma. Would that it were so easy. Well, how would you like to get smarter merely by popping a pill? Or by knocking back a fruit-flavored drink with a name such as "IQ Booster"?
MAGAZINE
February 2, 1992
I am concerned about the tone of Jeff Greenwald's article, in that the casual reader may conclude that all "smart drugs" are safe. Competent adults, of course, ought to have the right to patronize "smart lounges" and imbibe smart drugs, just as they have the freedom to indulge in dumb ones, like alcohol and nicotine. They should also be adequately warned of possible complications. Two of the smart drugs mentioned by Greenwald trouble me the most: vasopressin and Dilantin. Both, in my opinion, should be taken only under strict medical and laboratory supervision as their unmonitored consumption may lead to serious or fatal consequences.
MAGAZINE
December 22, 1991 | JEFF GREENWALD, Jeff Greenwald's most recent book, "Shopping for Buddhas," was published by Harper San Francisco. He reported on Chinese labor camps in the June 16 issue of the Times Magazine
AT 2 O'CLOCK ON A SUMMER MORNING, THE Smart Lounge pulsed like a human brain. Flashes of light strobed through the cavelike cellar, and computer-generated music throbbed from enormous speakers. Mobiles and Day-Glo planets hung from the ceiling, dancing in the air currents like elusive thoughts.
NEWS
May 21, 1989 | Elliott Almond \f7
In 1966, John Griggs robbed a man of LSD at gunpoint, according to a former friend's testimony before a grand jury. The act dramatically changed Griggs' life. A week later, Glen Lynd testified in 1973 before the Orange County Grand Jury, Griggs experimented with the LSD, "threw away his gun and was running around hollering, 'This is it.' That's how it all began." Lynd in 1973 was describing the origins of the Laguna Beach-based Brotherhood of Eternal Love, which by then was alleged to be an international drug ring.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | PATRICIA BIBBY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alcohol, the great social lubricant, no longer is invited to some bars and parties. Instead, so-called smart drinks, often brightly colored fruit cocktails, have replaced it as the focal point in a number of social settings. The trend started in San Francisco and Los Angeles with "rave parties"--huge underground affairs held in abandoned warehouses. Instead of alcohol, revelers tank up on "Power Punch," "IQ Booster," "Psuper Psonic Psyber Tonic" (or "Tang With a Bang") and "Energy Elicksure."
NEWS
January 24, 1992 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an age of personal computers and fax machines, CNN and MTV, some people are threatened by what's become an epidemic of information. With so many channels and choices, it's difficult to know what to believe. Then there are people like R.U. Sirius, who shiver in giddy anticipation of the new order that rampant technology might create. "The culture is just emerging," says Sirius, considered a cult leader among those who have front-row seats to the microchip future.
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