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Smart Final Iris Corp

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BUSINESS
July 7, 1987 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
With corporate names like Allegis, Unisys and Primerica in vogue, it is unusual to encounter a homey-sounding handle that doesn't smack of being invented by a consultant with a hyperactive computer. On the other hand, the name Smart & Final Iris, like many of the new corporate titles, does not spell out what this old-line Los Angeles company does. Explicit--like Goodyear Tire & Rubber or Campbell Soup--it's not. Nevertheless, company President Robert J.
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BUSINESS
July 7, 1987 | MARTHA GROVES, Times Staff Writer
With corporate names like Allegis, Unisys and Primerica in vogue, it is unusual to encounter a homey-sounding handle that doesn't smack of being invented by a consultant with a hyperactive computer. On the other hand, the name Smart & Final Iris, like many of the new corporate titles, does not spell out what this old-line Los Angeles company does. Explicit--like Goodyear Tire & Rubber or Campbell Soup--it's not. Nevertheless, company President Robert J.
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BUSINESS
August 13, 1989
When I read Harry Bernstein's labor column of Aug. 1, "Many Americans Share Miners' Problem," I was dismayed to find that untruths, half-truths and innuendoes had been so freely used to attack Smart & Final Iris Corp. and falsely portray the facts and circumstances of its current labor situation. Bernstein never requested comment from either myself or, to my knowledge, any other Smart & Final representative. Had he done so, he would have been provided the following information contradicting the "facts" presented: First, Smart & Final never "refused to continue paying health-care premiums for retirees."
BUSINESS
August 1, 1989 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Your job may be a world apart from that of the striking U.S. coal miners, but you almost certainly share at least one increasingly serious problem with the embattled miners: the difficulty in getting and keeping adequate, often urgently needed, medical care after retirement.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1988 | GEORGE WHITE, Times Staff Writer
The French owner of the flashy Elle fashion magazine agreed Wednesday to pay $712 million to buy the company that publishes Woman's Day, Car & Driver and American Photographer. Paris-based Hachette would get the magazines owned by Diamandis Communications, a New York-based firm formed last year by a management-led buyout of CBS' magazine division. Hachette said the deal would make it the world's largest producer of magazines. "We're No.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE
Jay E. Candelaria thought he had a great idea four years ago. Having been told that hamburgers and french fries were very popular with Asian diners, he figured that another American culinary standard--the chicken pot pie--might also fare well. But when the Fullerton banker began looking for a company to manufacture chicken pies for export to Asia, he learned that most were already having trouble meeting chicken pie orders for restaurants and food distributors.
NEWS
December 30, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Teamsters Union, frequently portrayed as a venal monolith, is in fact two classes of people often isolated from each other. At the top of the nation's largest trade union is an international executive board, traditionally composed of entrenched and occasionally corrupt regional union leaders who meet periodically at the union's lavish "marble palace" in Washington. The board members each draw an extra $75,000 a year for their attendance.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1989 | HARRY ANDERSON, Times Staff Writer
You can tell a lot about a place by knowing a little about the people who started the best-known businesses there. The knowledge tells you, for instance, what it has taken to succeed and survive in the local economy. Although Southern California is sometimes accused of having a short memory about its past, not all its businesses have been flashes in the pan. In fact, it has no shortage of long-established, successful companies.
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