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NATIONAL
April 27, 2009 | Rebecca Cole
One warm August afternoon in 2003, a power failure originating in Ohio coursed through the electrical grid in the Northeast, sparking the nation's largest blackout and leaving millions in eight states without air conditioning, traffic lights and cellphone service. Energy experts say that shutdown, which cost an estimated $6 billion, might have been averted by a "smart grid."
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OPINION
December 6, 2013
Re "Clean energy could choke the grid," Dec. 3 The Times ignores the fact that extreme weather, not renewables, poses the biggest threat to the nation's energy grid. Regardless of the energy source, the grid requires smart management and investment. Predicting mechanical problems at the many aging power plants can be tricky. Imagine asking a mechanic to foresee every problem with a 40-year-old car. System managers are becoming more sophisticated at forecasting weather patterns and are already integrating large quantities of renewables with no reliability impacts.
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NATIONAL
October 27, 2009 | Jim Tankersley
President Obama and administration officials today will announce $3.4 billion in spending projects to modernize the nation's electric power system. The president will offer details on funding for the "smart grid" during an appearance at a solar plant in Arcadia, Fla. White House officials said the projects would create tens of thousands of jobs in the near term and lay the groundwork for changing how Americans use and pay for energy. The spending is aimed at improving the efficiency and reliability of the U.S. power supply, and helping to create markets for wind and solar power, officials said.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
He was one of the creators of the iPod and the iPhone. Now former Apple executive Tony Fadell is trying to bring some of that magic to a gadget that is an afterthought in most homes. Called Nest, it's a smart thermostat geared to the iPhone generation. It's designed to learn homeowners' schedules and surroundings and keep them comfortable while saving them money on energy bills. Nest can also connect to a home Wi-Fi and be remotely controlled with a smartphone, tablet or laptop.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2011 | By Brittany Levine, Los Angeles Times
A week ago, Jim Sepe began playing around with his appliances - turning up the air conditioner, setting the Jacuzzi at a lower temperature and running the microwave to watch numbers tick up and down on a digital photo frame he keeps on his kitchen countertop. "It's really fun," Sepe said. "I learned that if I did this or that, or turned my Jacuzzi down a few degrees, I was saving money. " Sepe is a guinea pig for a new project, cooked up by a Burbank businessman, Glendale Water & Power and Ceiva, a digital frame maker, that displays electricity and water usage on a small frame to get people to engage with the smart-grid technology the city has spent $20 million on. Glendale was the first city in the nation to get federal stimulus money for installing smart-grid technology in March.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
General Electric Co. is working with Google Inc. to develop a so-called smart electrical grid that can make better use of power derived from renewable energy. The companies will jointly lobby U.S. lawmakers and collaborate on technologies to make alternative energy sources, such as wind, geothermal and solar, commercially successful. The partnership was unveiled at a news conference at Google's offices in Mountain View, Calif. With a smart grid, people would be able to monitor individual energy use, sell energy back to utilities from electric-car batteries and program appliances to turn on at times when electricity is least expensive, a spokeswoman said.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2008 | DAVID LAZARUS
California's three biggest utilities are charging customers nearly $4.6 billion to install millions of "smart meters" at homes and businesses. These newfangled meters, the utilities promise, will revolutionize energy usage by giving consumers far greater control over how much they pay for power. Unfortunately, the meters could be outdated before they're even operational.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
He was one of the creators of the iPod and the iPhone. Now former Apple executive Tony Fadell is trying to bring some of that magic to a gadget that is an afterthought in most homes. Called Nest, it's a smart thermostat geared to the iPhone generation. It's designed to learn homeowners' schedules and surroundings and keep them comfortable while saving them money on energy bills. Nest can also connect to a home Wi-Fi and be remotely controlled with a smartphone, tablet or laptop.
OPINION
December 6, 2013
Re "Clean energy could choke the grid," Dec. 3 The Times ignores the fact that extreme weather, not renewables, poses the biggest threat to the nation's energy grid. Regardless of the energy source, the grid requires smart management and investment. Predicting mechanical problems at the many aging power plants can be tricky. Imagine asking a mechanic to foresee every problem with a 40-year-old car. System managers are becoming more sophisticated at forecasting weather patterns and are already integrating large quantities of renewables with no reliability impacts.
OPINION
June 4, 2011
Politics and religion Re "Romney's religious 'test,' " Opinion, June 1 In reading Tim Rutten's Op-Ed column concerning Mitt Romney's Mormonism, I was struck by the quote from Warren Cole Smith: "I believe a candidate who either by intent or effect promotes a false and dangerous religion is unfit to serve. " I understand I am in a minority here, but I believe that anyone who thinks there is an immortal, all-powerful being sitting somewhere listening to their mumblings is not totally sane and almost certain to be dangerous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2011 | By Brittany Levine, Los Angeles Times
A week ago, Jim Sepe began playing around with his appliances - turning up the air conditioner, setting the Jacuzzi at a lower temperature and running the microwave to watch numbers tick up and down on a digital photo frame he keeps on his kitchen countertop. "It's really fun," Sepe said. "I learned that if I did this or that, or turned my Jacuzzi down a few degrees, I was saving money. " Sepe is a guinea pig for a new project, cooked up by a Burbank businessman, Glendale Water & Power and Ceiva, a digital frame maker, that displays electricity and water usage on a small frame to get people to engage with the smart-grid technology the city has spent $20 million on. Glendale was the first city in the nation to get federal stimulus money for installing smart-grid technology in March.
OPINION
June 4, 2011
Politics and religion Re "Romney's religious 'test,' " Opinion, June 1 In reading Tim Rutten's Op-Ed column concerning Mitt Romney's Mormonism, I was struck by the quote from Warren Cole Smith: "I believe a candidate who either by intent or effect promotes a false and dangerous religion is unfit to serve. " I understand I am in a minority here, but I believe that anyone who thinks there is an immortal, all-powerful being sitting somewhere listening to their mumblings is not totally sane and almost certain to be dangerous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2011 | By Melanie Hicken, Los Angeles Times
Glendale and Burbank officials are touting their new "smart meters" project as an exciting technological advancement that will help the utilities and customers track real-time water and electrical use. But a small group of residents is resisting, saying they're worried about the health effects of the radio waves emitted by the meters. They also say the utilities' ability to view electricity and water usage as it occurs is intrusive and could change the rate structure. When a contractor arrived to install a smart meter at Erik Bottema's residence, the technician was ordered off his property.
NATIONAL
October 27, 2009 | Office of the Press Secretary, The White House
DeSoto Next Generation Solar Energy Center THE PRESIDENT: Thank you, guys. Thank you very much. Please, have a seat. Thank you so much. Well, first of all, let me thank Lew Hay and his visionary leadership at Florida Power & Light. It's an example of a company that is doing well by doing good. And I think it's a model for what we could duplicate all across the country. To Greg Bove, who just gave me the tour and was a construction manager for this facility, congratulations.
NATIONAL
October 27, 2009 | Jim Tankersley
President Obama and administration officials today will announce $3.4 billion in spending projects to modernize the nation's electric power system. The president will offer details on funding for the "smart grid" during an appearance at a solar plant in Arcadia, Fla. White House officials said the projects would create tens of thousands of jobs in the near term and lay the groundwork for changing how Americans use and pay for energy. The spending is aimed at improving the efficiency and reliability of the U.S. power supply, and helping to create markets for wind and solar power, officials said.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2009 | Rebecca Cole
One warm August afternoon in 2003, a power failure originating in Ohio coursed through the electrical grid in the Northeast, sparking the nation's largest blackout and leaving millions in eight states without air conditioning, traffic lights and cellphone service. Energy experts say that shutdown, which cost an estimated $6 billion, might have been averted by a "smart grid."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2011 | By Melanie Hicken, Los Angeles Times
Glendale and Burbank officials are touting their new "smart meters" project as an exciting technological advancement that will help the utilities and customers track real-time water and electrical use. But a small group of residents is resisting, saying they're worried about the health effects of the radio waves emitted by the meters. They also say the utilities' ability to view electricity and water usage as it occurs is intrusive and could change the rate structure. When a contractor arrived to install a smart meter at Erik Bottema's residence, the technician was ordered off his property.
NATIONAL
October 27, 2009 | Office of the Press Secretary, The White House
DeSoto Next Generation Solar Energy Center THE PRESIDENT: Thank you, guys. Thank you very much. Please, have a seat. Thank you so much. Well, first of all, let me thank Lew Hay and his visionary leadership at Florida Power & Light. It's an example of a company that is doing well by doing good. And I think it's a model for what we could duplicate all across the country. To Greg Bove, who just gave me the tour and was a construction manager for this facility, congratulations.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
General Electric Co. is working with Google Inc. to develop a so-called smart electrical grid that can make better use of power derived from renewable energy. The companies will jointly lobby U.S. lawmakers and collaborate on technologies to make alternative energy sources, such as wind, geothermal and solar, commercially successful. The partnership was unveiled at a news conference at Google's offices in Mountain View, Calif. With a smart grid, people would be able to monitor individual energy use, sell energy back to utilities from electric-car batteries and program appliances to turn on at times when electricity is least expensive, a spokeswoman said.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2008 | DAVID LAZARUS
California's three biggest utilities are charging customers nearly $4.6 billion to install millions of "smart meters" at homes and businesses. These newfangled meters, the utilities promise, will revolutionize energy usage by giving consumers far greater control over how much they pay for power. Unfortunately, the meters could be outdated before they're even operational.
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