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Smart Growth

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2012 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
Eight years ago, elated Ventura City Hall officials had snagged Rick Cole as their new city manager, hailing Southern California's smart-growth guru as just the guy to transform their sleepy beach town into a model of sustainable, eco-friendly growth. Cole had helped revitalize Pasadena by reimagining the city's historic core, called Old Pasadena. He did the same for Azusa, applying the "new urbanism" rules of high-density, pedestrian-friendly construction as an alternative to big-box retail development and suburban sprawl.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2013 | By David Zahniser
A judge has dealt a serious setback to Los Angeles' efforts to bring larger development to parts of Hollywood, saying a new zoning plan is "fatally flawed" and should be rescinded by the City Council. In a 41-page tentative ruling issued this week, Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Allan J. Goodman said city leaders failed to comply with the state's environmental law when they approved an update to the Hollywood Community Plan, which maps out rules for growth and development.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2000
Now that Ventura County voters have said no to the traditional "suburban sprawl" style of development, it's time for city and county governments to adopt policies that encourage--or at least permit--smart growth within the designated urban boundaries. A report in today's Ventura County Edition of The Times demonstrates that these necessary changes of policy and attitude are too slow in coming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
The corner of Pico and Sepulveda boulevards is your standard Westside traffic nightmare, with rush hour commuters inching along at discouraging speeds just blocks from an even more congested 405 Freeway. The intersection, already a subject of bitter conversations among nearby residents, could see thousands more cars each day if the Los Angeles City Council this month signs off on a plan for 638 apartments, a supermarket, new restaurants and possibly a Target store. Backed by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, the so-called Casden West L.A. project is one of the city's most controversial examples of transit-oriented development - shopping and housing concentrated around a planned Expo Line light rail station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2001
For years, the approach favored by slow-growthers in the San Fernando Valley and elsewhere has been that if you don't build it, they won't come. That's the tactic being used, for example, in Burbank to control growth of the Burbank Airport. By blocking replacement of the cramped, 70-year-old terminal, airport opponents hope to keep passenger levels from soaring from 4.7 million last year to the 9.4 million passengers the Southern California Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2000 | MARGARET TALEV
With strict SOAR growth-control laws in place, all eyes will be on Ventura County to see how it will develop in the new century. That was the message delivered Thursday at a conference called "Plains, Terrains and Automobiles" at the Ventura Beach Hotel attended by more than 250 county planners, developers, environmentalists and transportation officials.
OPINION
December 17, 2006
Re "Mega-projects could reshape L.A. growth," Dec. 13 The article contrasts today's "smart growth" with what came before: "In the 1960s and '70s, for example, city planners created a second downtown in Century City, but they did so far from any freeways or mass transit, a legacy that Westside commuters deal with daily." However, Century City was intended to be smart growth. From a 1972 Times article: "When the Planning Commission approved the master plan of Welton Becket Associates for the vast development of Century City, it was agreed that both a Beverly Hills freeway and a rapid transit line would be needed to make the center possible."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2008 | GEORGE SKELTON
Shorter commutes. Less sprawl. Cleaner air. Denser housing closer to downtown near transportation hubs. "Smart growth" it's called. California policy makers have been yakking about this -- dreaming about it -- for decades. But too many interests have been prospering from dumb growth or have merely been skittish of a future they can't quite visualize. Enter a tenacious policy wonk with roots in local government: state Sen. Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento). He has just managed to finesse to the verge of legislative passage a visionary smart growth bill that, by its nature, also fights global warming.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1999 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may seem that any campaign to fight suburban sprawl in Southern California is about a century late. The region already stretches for 100 miles in many directions, jammed with a mishmash of shopping malls, parking lots, warehouses and tract homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2002 | MARGARET TALEV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prompted by a developer's proposal to build nearly 2,000 homes in an adjacent canyon, Santa Paula activists will hold a "smart growth" conference Saturday to discuss alternative plans for the blue-collar city. Event organizer Mike Miller is urging the city's 29,000 residents to reject a proposal to build a suburb in Adams Canyon. Voters will be asked to consider that plan in November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2013 | Kate Linthicum
Chris Robbins could be a poster child for mayoral candidate Eric Garcetti's vision for Los Angeles. Each morning, Robbins straps on a backpack, cues up his iPod and sets out on a short walk to the subway, which whisks him to his downtown public relations job. He and his wife share one car. On the weekends, they like to stay local, savoring their neighborhood's array of new restaurants and bars. Over 12 years as Hollywood's councilman, Garcetti has emerged as a leading champion of "smart growth," which aims to entice residents like Robbins out of cars by densely concentrating new development along transit lines.
SCIENCE
December 20, 2012 | Bettina Boxall
A new report on residential construction places the Los Angeles region in some surprising company.   Contradicting metropolitan L.A.'s reputation as the capital of unbridled sprawl, roughly two-thirds of new housing built there between 2005 and 2009 was infill - constructed in previously developed areas rather than on raw land in the exurbs. Other large metro areas with high infill rates were New York, San Francisco and San Jose, according to an analysis released by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2012 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
Eight years ago, elated Ventura City Hall officials had snagged Rick Cole as their new city manager, hailing Southern California's smart-growth guru as just the guy to transform their sleepy beach town into a model of sustainable, eco-friendly growth. Cole had helped revitalize Pasadena by reimagining the city's historic core, called Old Pasadena. He did the same for Azusa, applying the "new urbanism" rules of high-density, pedestrian-friendly construction as an alternative to big-box retail development and suburban sprawl.
OPINION
October 6, 2012
Responding to William Fulton's Op-Ed article Monday positing a link between urban sprawl and municipal bankruptcies, reader Sidney P. Anderson of Mission Viejo writes: "As a retired taxpayer whose home has been saved by Proposition 13, I consider Fulton's argument poorly disguised apologia. He does mention pensions half-heartedly in his discussion on what empties cities' coffers, but he fails to use the word 'union' even once. He evidently does not object to this cost but blames instead a lack of tax revenue to pay for it. He is obviously not a fan of nonunion taxpayers who end up paying for these unionized government workers' generous benefits.
OPINION
August 16, 2012
There is no doubt that Los Angeles would be a more pleasant place to live if more people would leave their cars at home. So would the rest of you please get off the freeway? The notion that public transit or ride-sharing or bicycles are for "other people" is so commonly held that it has bedeviled the best efforts of urban planners to reduce sprawl and promote car-free communities. For years, Los Angeles has been experimenting with zoning and construction rules that encourage high density near public transit stations - so-called transit-oriented development - and creating more housing near employment centers to shorten commutes.
OPINION
August 28, 2008
The number of miles Californians drive is growing almost twice as fast as the state's population, as housing developments sprout farther and farther from commercial centers. Not only does this urban sprawl put upward pressure on gasoline prices, it creates freeway gridlock, worsens air pollution and makes fighting global warming next to impossible. California lawmakers have tried and failed for decades to bring sprawl under control, but they may finally be on the verge of success. SB 375 from Sen. Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento)
OPINION
July 11, 2007
SMART GROWTH, we want so badly to believe in you. You were centrally planned by the greatest minds of our time, conceived in an atmosphere of collective purpose and self-criticism, built to the greenest specifications and fired by a bold vision: victory over the individual will and the creation of a new citizenry for a new century. If only you would work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2008 | GEORGE SKELTON
Shorter commutes. Less sprawl. Cleaner air. Denser housing closer to downtown near transportation hubs. "Smart growth" it's called. California policy makers have been yakking about this -- dreaming about it -- for decades. But too many interests have been prospering from dumb growth or have merely been skittish of a future they can't quite visualize. Enter a tenacious policy wonk with roots in local government: state Sen. Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento). He has just managed to finesse to the verge of legislative passage a visionary smart growth bill that, by its nature, also fights global warming.
OPINION
June 17, 2008
Environmental leadership, or growth and opportunity? For three decades, it seemed that California could only have one or the other: Responsible stewardship of our resources coupled with slow growth -- and a resulting shortage of housing and jobs; or continued economic power -- with the degradation brought by traffic and sprawl. Now the state is finding its way toward a model in which environmentalism and growth complement each other.
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