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SPORTS
July 12, 2008
Brandon Jennings [July 10] is not a trend-setter, he ran out of options. To spin this as if he is helping mankind and pushing back at the NBA and the NCAA is almost laughable. He does not have a choice, because the choice he made was to work on his crossover while other kids did their homework. Jeff Wolf Encino
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 15, 2014 | By Bill Shaikin
By all accounts, Mark Walter is rare among baseball owners. When he says he lets the baseball people make player personnel decisions because he is not a baseball expert, he actually means it. However, in his early days as the Dodgers' controlling owner, Walter expressed skepticism about long-term contracts for starting pitchers. "Pitchers break," he said. On Wednesday, the Dodgers agreed to make Clayton Kershaw the highest-paid pitcher in baseball history. Walter declined to confirm the $215-million deal - the Dodgers are expected to make an annoucement Friday - but he was succinct in explaining why he would even consider approving it. "Greg Maddux," Walter said.
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NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Tiger Woods said Tuesday that there's "no timetable" for returning to competitive golf while he recovers from injuries to his knee and Achilles tendon. Woods spoke in Pennsylvania at the Aronimink Golf Club for the AT&T National, which he's also sitting out. For Woods, who has dominated at 73 PGA Tour events but last won one in September 2009, the decision was likely a wrenching one. "That's hard for me. I've always been very goal-oriented about when I'm going to play," he said Tuesday.  But it was the right decision to make, research shows.
OPINION
June 16, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
In the more than two decades since the U.S. government declared chimpanzees in the wild to be an endangered species, not much has improved for those great apes. The threats of habitat loss, poaching and disease have only intensified. Now, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed reclassifying captive chimpanzees as well, moving them from the "threatened" category to "endangered," a change that brings with it stricter guidelines covering the handling and use of the animals. In the future, any procedure that harms, harasses or kills a research chimp would require a permit.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1996
Treasury Secretary Rubin's proposal to issue bonds adjusted for inflation met with a generally negative press, including your Tom Petruno ("Will 'Inflation-Protected' Bonds Be a Good Buy?" May 17), and I wonder why. They have been a success in Canada. If they work for our Treasury, commercial bonds will surely follow. The bond market is a stumbling block to any sort of progressive growth. "Fear of inflation" is cited whenever employment rates climb, or the economy "heats up," as if prosperity was a bad thing.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2009 | DAVID LAZARUS
President Obama is correct in saying that a public health insurance plan would help lower costs for everyone by making the market more competitive. But when the Obama administration signaled this week that it was backing away from a public plan, it wasn't putting the kibosh on meaningful change. What it was saying was that we've taken our collective eye off the ball. The point of this debate isn't whether the government should offer its own insurance product -- and it's certainly not whether the government wants "death panels" to kill old people.
SPORTS
April 27, 1992 | DAN HAFNER
Many people think Mitch Williams, the bullpen ace of the Philadelphia Phillies, is a bit of a character. Off the mound he does and says unusual things. But in a game Williams has never been accused of giving anything but his best. His smart move Sunday at Philadelphia saved the Phillies' 5-4 victory over the New York Mets. Sent in to protect a one-run lead during the ninth, Williams was in trouble. The Mets put runners on first and third with one out and Bobby Bonilla was at the plate.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1985 | Lawrence J. Magid, Lawrence J. Magid is executive vice president of Know How, a San Francisco-based microcomputer education company
Now that personal computers have been around for a few years, we're seeing a market for used equipment. Turn to the classified section of most local papers, and you'll probably see a special section featuring personal or "home" computers. Attend a meeting of a computer user group, and you're likely to find members swapping used equipment. Some areas have occasional "computer swap meets," and some cities have stores specializing in used computers. People sell used equipment for a lot of reasons.
OPINION
November 20, 2012
For decades, the Los Angeles Convention Center, that drab behemoth on the south edge of downtown, has done a serviceable job of providing space for local trade and consumer shows, most notably the Auto Show. But if Los Angeles officials want it to be competitive on a national level and generate more revenue - enough to make it worth keeping - then the city needs to get out of the business of operating it. That is the centerpiece of a proposal to revamp the marketing and management of the Convention Center that will come before the City Council next month.
SPORTS
July 4, 2009 | Mike Bresnahan
Staff writer Mike Bresnahan ties up some loose ends after an unpredictable start for the Lakers in free agency. Q&A of the day Question: "I couldn't wait to see what you thought of this nightmare. I was really hoping it was just a bad dream since I fell asleep to SportsCenter . . . unfortunately it's not. "I'm really upset. I'm sure you caught Ron Artest's interview [on ESPN] where he said we need to be 'hoodalized'? Yup, that's just what we need?!? I just don't get it . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2013
Mayor-elect   Eric Garcetti   is preaching a gospel of civic rebirth in appearances across Los Angeles while gently lowering expectations about how much City Hall, and he himself, can do to bring about change. Join us at 9 a.m. when we talk with Times reporter Catherine Saillant about the balance Garcetti is aiming to strike with audiences hopeful after a campaign filled with promises of change, while acknowledging the tough reality of chronic ills like clogged freeways and underperforming schools.
SPORTS
April 14, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
That's one confrontation avoided, for now. Carlos Quentin , Stanford man, has elected to drop the appeal for his eight-game suspension for charging Dodgers pitcher Zack Greinke and began serving it Sunday. Which means, of course, he will not participate when the Padres come to Dodger Stadium for a three-game series on Monday. See, Quentin is smart. That's what Clayton Kershaw said he'd be if he simply took the suspension and skipped the Dodgers' series.
OPINION
November 20, 2012
For decades, the Los Angeles Convention Center, that drab behemoth on the south edge of downtown, has done a serviceable job of providing space for local trade and consumer shows, most notably the Auto Show. But if Los Angeles officials want it to be competitive on a national level and generate more revenue - enough to make it worth keeping - then the city needs to get out of the business of operating it. That is the centerpiece of a proposal to revamp the marketing and management of the Convention Center that will come before the City Council next month.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
The feature debut from writer-director Nicholas Ozeki, "Mamitas" is an adaptation of his earlier short film of the same name, and despite flashes of lively charm the expansion may not be entirely justified. Los Angeles high-schooler Jordin Juarez (E.J. Bonilla) tests well but doesn't apply himself, opting instead to put on the air of a tough-guy player. After being shot down by her cousin, he ends up talking to Felipa Talia (Veronica Diaz-Carranza), a bookish girl he wouldn't normally give a second look.
SPORTS
July 10, 2012 | Bill Plaschke
For years, it was an organization defined by a crazy owner, his careless vision and caustic misfortune. For years, even during their rare brushes with success, they were viewed not as an actual basketball team, but as a comedic product of a strange man's obsession, a parlor trick trotted out 82 times a years to entertain family and friends. They were never just "The Clippers," right? They were always, "Donald Sterling's Clippers," with that villainous prefix defining their perception and determining their future.
OPINION
June 4, 2012 | By Barry Krisberg
So far, the only apparent solutions to California's budget crisis are increased revenues and draconian budget cuts. Legislative leaders have pledged to examine all options to avert further crippling reductions in state funding for higher education, the court system and social support for poor and vulnerable families. They should be looking at the state criminal justice system; there are savings that could help us avoid harsher cuts. To his credit, Gov. Jerry Brown has implemented budget and policy changes that have significantly reduced the state prison population and may reclaim up to $1 billion from the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.
SPORTS
April 4, 2010 | By Sam Farmer
This doesn't compute. The Philadelphia Eagles might have been able to ship Donovan McNabb to Oakland or Buffalo, moving him out of the NFC and keeping the five-time Pro Bowl quarterback at a safe distance. Instead, the Eagles on Sunday traded McNabb within the division, sending him to the Washington Redskins for a second-round pick this year and a third- or fourth-round selection next year. In doing so, the Eagles handed over one of the best players in club history to a bitter rival, and to new Coach Mike Shanahan, who already has one of the league's up-and-coming defenses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2012 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
It's hard to tell who stole, er, embraced the pension legislation first. Was it Gov. Jerry Brown? Or Republican legislators? Either way, it was an artful heist. When GOP legislators last week adopted en masse the Democratic governor's proposed public pension reform as their own, it was like the Lakers shooting jumpers for the Clippers or cats purring alongside dogs. It's very rare — and I can't think of a similar occasion — when legislators of one party unconditionally endorse a top legislative priority of a governor from the other party.
NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Tiger Woods said Tuesday that there's "no timetable" for returning to competitive golf while he recovers from injuries to his knee and Achilles tendon. Woods spoke in Pennsylvania at the Aronimink Golf Club for the AT&T National, which he's also sitting out. For Woods, who has dominated at 73 PGA Tour events but last won one in September 2009, the decision was likely a wrenching one. "That's hard for me. I've always been very goal-oriented about when I'm going to play," he said Tuesday.  But it was the right decision to make, research shows.
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