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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2009 | Esmeralda Bermudez
Khadijah Williams stepped into chemistry class and instantly tuned out the commotion. She walked past students laughing, gossiping, napping and combing one another's hair. Past a cellphone blaring rap songs. And past a substitute teacher sitting in a near-daze. Quietly, the 18-year-old settled into an empty table, flipped open her physics book and focused. Nothing mattered now except homework. "No wonder you're going to Harvard," a girl teased her. Around here, Khadijah is known as "Harvard girl," the "smart girl" and the girl with the contagious smile who landed at Jefferson High School only 18 months ago. What students don't know is that she is also a homeless girl.
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NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
The folks over at ASAP Science have pulled out their dry-erase markers to explain why we yawn. It's an appropriate topic given that today is World Sleep Day . But, as these smart people explain, yawning isn't necessarily about being tired. Guinea pigs yawn to display anger. Human fetuses yawn. We likely yawn as a form of empathy -- which explains its contagiousness -- and we also do it to keep our brains from melting.  OK, that's an exaggeration.  But many believe we yawn to pull extra oxygen into our lungs; ASAP says, rather, yawning likely helps to cool our brains when needed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2008 | Carina Chocano, Times Movie Critic
"Smart People" is the kind of small, cranky family and/or friendship comedy that has been busting out since "Sideways," often exceeding expectations, occasionally inspiring a backlash, and sometimes not. In this case, the lineage feels easy to trace because of the appearance of Thomas Haden Church as a charming reprobate, but there's plenty to link it to other recent comedies of measured breakdowns and bearable angst like "The Squid and the Whale," "The Savages" and "Little Miss Sunshine."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
The very best piece of writing I've encountered on Twitter comes from a feed called NeinQuarterly . Here it is: “At Starbucks I order under the name Godot. Then leave.” That's an almost perfect use of Twitter as a platform: Aphoristic, and yet hinting at a depth of knowledge underneath. It's a joke, but one you have to know something to get. The same is true of much of what appears at NeinQuarterly, which bills itself as a “Compendium of Utopian Negation,” but is really more a labor of love.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
The very best piece of writing I've encountered on Twitter comes from a feed called NeinQuarterly . Here it is: “At Starbucks I order under the name Godot. Then leave.” That's an almost perfect use of Twitter as a platform: Aphoristic, and yet hinting at a depth of knowledge underneath. It's a joke, but one you have to know something to get. The same is true of much of what appears at NeinQuarterly, which bills itself as a “Compendium of Utopian Negation,” but is really more a labor of love.
SPORTS
January 28, 2012
STEVE YOUNG began his career with the USFL's L.A. Express, then moved on to the NFL's Tampa Bay Buccaneers and San Francisco 49ers. He eventually replaced the great Joe Montana for the 49ers, carving his legendary career. A two-time NFL most valuable player, Young directed the 49ers to victory in Super Bowl XXIX and made the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2005. He is an ESPN analyst. The quarterback position is unique. What other position do you really have to get everybody on board every time?
OPINION
November 29, 2009 | By Stephen Randall
I'm not so sure I like my friends anymore. I used to like them -- honest. We'd have lunch, talk on the phone or exchange e-mails, and they all seemed normal enough. But then came Facebook, and I was introduced to a sad fact: Many of my friends have dark sides that they had kept from me. Sure, there were times these dark sides would surface -- after too many drinks, say -- but apologies and denials would follow, and all seemed healthy . . . or at least acceptable. Today my friends trumpet the more unpleasant aspects of their personalities via Facebook status updates.
SCIENCE
March 11, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
What do Facebook users who “like” Mozart, Morgan Freeman's voice, "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" and curly fries have in common? They are likely to have high IQs, according to a new study . Meanwhile, those who like Facebook pages related to mountain biking, business administration, engineering and the book "48 Laws of Power" are apt to be calm and relaxed, the study found. These and other patterns emerged from an analysis of 58,000 Facebook users and the things that prompted them to click the little blue thumbs-up icon.
OPINION
July 13, 2009
Re "A national symbol at risk in D.C.," Column One, July 4 It would seem only fitting that the Department of Homeland Security would take the very symbol of American freedom from Americans. The so-called Patriot Act has already done a pretty good job of restricting citizens' rights; why not complete the job? Jeff Button San Clemente -- I hope there are enough smart people left in Washington to point out that the Department of Homeland Security can build somewhere else than in protected habitat.
SPORTS
April 13, 2013
"I heard there are some smart people at Stanford. That wasn't too smart. " - Matt Kemp of the Dodgers, on Padres slugger (and former Stanford student) Carlos Quentin, who broke the collarbone of Zack Greinke by charging the mound and flinging him to the ground, after what Quentin decided - and Greinke denied - was an intentional hit by pitch. "Not sure what I would do if someone charged and lowered their shoulder at me … but lowering mine back prob isnt at the top of the list" - Cleveland Indians pitcher Vinnie Pestano, on Twitter, on Greinke's reaction to Quentin rushing the mound.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
News flash: Global warming hits California! That's right -- the Golden State has become the Golden Baking State, with temperatures soaring into the triple digits . For example, in Johnny Carson's “beautiful downtown Burbank” on Sunday, the thermometer hit 103 -- hot enough to melt Ed McMahon's smile. And on Mother's Day no less! Apparently it really isn't nice to fool with Mother Nature. You may think this is just a “heat wave.” But you're wrong. This is Al Gore Vindication Day. This is climate Armageddon.
SPORTS
April 13, 2013
"I heard there are some smart people at Stanford. That wasn't too smart. " - Matt Kemp of the Dodgers, on Padres slugger (and former Stanford student) Carlos Quentin, who broke the collarbone of Zack Greinke by charging the mound and flinging him to the ground, after what Quentin decided - and Greinke denied - was an intentional hit by pitch. "Not sure what I would do if someone charged and lowered their shoulder at me … but lowering mine back prob isnt at the top of the list" - Cleveland Indians pitcher Vinnie Pestano, on Twitter, on Greinke's reaction to Quentin rushing the mound.
SCIENCE
March 11, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
What do Facebook users who “like” Mozart, Morgan Freeman's voice, "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" and curly fries have in common? They are likely to have high IQs, according to a new study . Meanwhile, those who like Facebook pages related to mountain biking, business administration, engineering and the book "48 Laws of Power" are apt to be calm and relaxed, the study found. These and other patterns emerged from an analysis of 58,000 Facebook users and the things that prompted them to click the little blue thumbs-up icon.
NATIONAL
February 5, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Aaron Swartz may change the Internet yet again, even in death, with the help of lawmakers who have expressed a fondness for breaking the law. At a Washington, D.C., memorial Monday night, members of Congress and loved ones gathered to remember Swartz, who committed suicide on Jan. 11 while facing years in prison for mass-downloading scholarly articles. Swartz had already reshaped the Web experiences of millions by co-creating Reddit and the information-distribution service RSS. By turns, speakers at the Cannon House Office Building compared Swartz to Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, Apple founder Steve Jobs, and 20th century British programmer Alan Turing -- with Swartz as yet another cybergenius whose ambitions carried him to the law's edge.
NEWS
November 14, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- Republican Rep. Paul D. Ryan returned to Congress on Tuesday, his political star rising even if his political future remains uncertain. The Wisconsin congressman and GOP vice presidential nominee has dismissed talk of a 2016 presidential run, saying Americans are tired of politics, and he described the "shock" of losing on election night as a "foreign experience. " For now, he is retaking his perch on the House Budget Committee, the venue that launched him into the presidential campaign as Mitt Romney's running mate and which also produced the austerity blueprint that defines the Republican Party.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
When Gabrielle Giffords confronted Jared Lee Loughner, the man who shot her on the head in a mass shooting in Tucson, the two just intensely stared at the other, her husband Mark Kelly said on Friday. “Gabby's eyes were locked on his the entire time as I read our statement. I kept looking up and his expression would change. He was paying attention to what we were saying,” Kelly, a retired astronaut, told NBC's "Today" Show. “He wasn't really happy at points, and I almost felt like during that whole few minutes that he and Gabby were having quite the staring contest.” On Thursday, Loughner, 24, was sentenced to life in prison without parole for wounding Giffords and 12 others and killing six people in a January 2011 shooting rampage in a grocery story parking lot. Giffords, then a member of Congress, had been holding a routine Saturday morning meet-and-greet event with constituents when Loughner approached her and opened fire.
SPORTS
January 11, 1999 | STEVE HORN
What: "Sports Night" When: Tuesday, 9:30 p.m., Channel 7 The promos were right. This show has as much to do with sports as "Baywatch" did with water safety. (Not that I ever watched "Baywatch." Honest.) OK, so "Sports Night" is not about sports. What is it about? People. Funny people. Smart people. People who need people. People who talk like you and I wish we could talk.
SPORTS
April 2, 1988
I was shocked and dismayed to learn that Gene Mauch had called his last shot as manager after 26 years. He seemed out of place in the dugout--a gentleman among boys, absurdly dressed in the same pajama-like clothing. Still, he carried a presence, a self-assured style and grace that would match Cary Grant at his sartorial best. Always reputed to be among the most intelligent managers in baseball, Mauch was nevertheless unable to lead any of his teams to the World Series. I'm not about to offer any crackpot theories on why this is so, but I can relate to the kind of anger and frustration that Mauch has endured for more than a quarter century.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
President Obama was the clear winner Tuesday. And he took one author with him: Nate Silver. "The Signal and the Noise," Silver's explanation of how he does what he does, has climbed to No. 2 on the Amazon bestseller list . The 544 page book was published in September. What Silver does, of course, is sort through lots of data to try to find the real story. His fivethirtyeight blog is named for the 538 votes in the Electoral College -- a majority of which is what it takes to get a candidate in the White House.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | By James Rainey
“You didn't build that” stands a good chance of becoming one of the indelible, hot-button phrases of Campaign 2012. Mitt Romney and Republicans will use President Obama's words to attack him as the business-unfriendly  Bureaucrat in Chief. Democrats will defend the sentiment as common sense - suggesting only that no one who succeeds in business makes it entirely on their own. Obama's words about private enterprise resonate because they fit into perennial themes: the conservative notion that only unfettered individuals can build a rich and free society vs. the liberal idea that society (and sometimes government)
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