Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSmart Tv
IN THE NEWS

Smart Tv

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 21, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
If you have an Internet-infused TV set, apparently the apps you've just got to have are Netflix and YouTube. The streaming video apps top the list of most popular smart-TV apps for current owners and consumers, according to a recent Harris Interactive poll. Facebook, Amazon Instant Video and Pandora round out the poll's top five. That's probably encouraging for manufacturers, eager to translate the popularity of apps on mobile devices into sales of the larger, more sedentary screens they sell.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 27, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The Snakebyte Vyper is a 3-in-1 mobile tablet that can also control your TV and function as a video gaming console. Users can hold the tablet in their hands when they want to surf the Web, read e-books or check their social media. They can also hook up the tablet to its dock and use a wireless remote when they want to watch content from apps such asNetflix and HBO Go on their TV. And when they're ready for a video game, users can launch a gaming app on the tablet and play a game on the TV wih a controller that comes with the device.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
February 27, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The Snakebyte Vyper is a 3-in-1 mobile tablet that can also control your TV and function as a video gaming console. Users can hold the tablet in their hands when they want to surf the Web, read e-books or check their social media. They can also hook up the tablet to its dock and use a wireless remote when they want to watch content from apps such asNetflix and HBO Go on their TV. And when they're ready for a video game, users can launch a gaming app on the tablet and play a game on the TV wih a controller that comes with the device.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2014 | By Andrea Chang and Salvador Rodriguez
LATEST: More fireworks at CES 2014 -- T-Mobile's chief executive gets  kicked out of rival AT&T's event. LAS VEGAS -- Director Michael Bay stopped short of offering an apology for storming off the stage at Samsung's news conference. In a blog post on the director's website, Bay said: "Wow! I just embarrassed myself at CES. " Bay was blindsided by a malfunctioning teleprompter Monday afternoon while appearing on stage at Samsung's news conference to help tout its new 105-inch curved UHD (see video above)
BUSINESS
May 29, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
Smart TV manufacturers need more intelligent marketing, according to a survey by Analysys Mason . Fewer than half of people who own a television set that comes with applications to stream content from the web have connected their TV directly to the Internet. That doesn't bode well for manufacturers looking to monetize television sets beyond the initial sale. Analysys Mason said the manufacturers, such as Samsung, LG and Sony, must improve their education of consumers, build simpler user interfaces and strike deals to bring more relevant applications into the TVs. Some cable providers also have said they would build applications for smart TVs. That could make the experience of watching television more seamless for users.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
It's not enough these days to wonder what to watch on your TV; a growing question for many is how to watch. Just like any device in your life, TVs can now connect to the Internet. This lets you grab shows from the Internet and watch content whenever you want. Most new TVs come with the ability to connect to the Internet, but there are a number of ways to easily turn an existing TV into a so-called smart TV. Here's a primer. The simplest way to do so is to connect a TV to a laptop or computer using either a VGA or HDMI cable.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
For decades we've been watching TV. Now a new generation of televisions is beginning to watch us. Technological advances are giving the old clunky "boob tube" an I.Q. injection. Some of the new breed of smart TVs comes equipped with facial recognition technology of the kind used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, to "see" the images flickering on the screen and suggest new shows based on what you've been watching. Building on advances pioneered by the video game industry, some of the new TVs change channels with the sweep of the hand.
MAGAZINE
June 25, 1995 | WARREN BERGER, Warren Berger is a free-lance writer based in New York. He writes about media and advertising for the New York Times, Advertising Age and GQ. His last article for this magazine was "Chaos on Madison Avenue."
Last winter, as the air in Washington rang with politicians' cries to "zero out" government funding for public broadcasting, with some calling for the head of Barney the Dinosaur on a platter, John Hendricks was characteristically quiet. All he did was write a letter. It would have been understandable if Hendricks, who runs cable TV's Discovery Channel and The Learning Channel, had joined the public television lynch mob--if only to watch and gloat.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Roku, the consumer electronics company best known for its devices that deliver Internet video to televisions, is making a more ambitious play for the living room -- unveiling the Roku TV. The Silicon Valley company announced at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas -- a trade show that is ground zero for gadget news -- that it would enter the fast-growing smart TV market. Roku plans to license its software to television manufacturers, which will build and distribute the Roku TV. Two Chinese electronics manufacturers, TCL and Hisense, are the first to partner with Roku on the smart TV. Roku is entering a competitive market, with established television manufacturers including Samsung, LG and Sony; and entrants from Silicon Valley, such as Google Inc.'s re-branded Android TV (formerly known as Google TV)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Roku Inc., which makes devices to stream online content on television sets, said Wednesday it has received $60 million from investors including New York publishing giant Hearst Corp. The Saratoga, Calif., company said the Series F round was led by a "leading institutional investor," which the company did not name. The round included participation by BSkyB and News Corp., in addition to Hearst. The Apple TV competitor said the new funding will help it build its streaming software and services businesses.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Roku, the consumer electronics company best known for its devices that deliver Internet video to televisions, is making a more ambitious play for the living room -- unveiling the Roku TV. The Silicon Valley company announced at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas -- a trade show that is ground zero for gadget news -- that it would enter the fast-growing smart TV market. Roku plans to license its software to television manufacturers, which will build and distribute the Roku TV. Two Chinese electronics manufacturers, TCL and Hisense, are the first to partner with Roku on the smart TV. Roku is entering a competitive market, with established television manufacturers including Samsung, LG and Sony; and entrants from Silicon Valley, such as Google Inc.'s re-branded Android TV (formerly known as Google TV)
BUSINESS
November 22, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
LG this week confirmed that its Smart TV sets are collecting information on users' viewing habits even when they have not been authorized to do so. The South Korean tech company's Smart TVs include a feature that gathers information on what users are watching and sends it back to LG in order to come up with recommendations for other content that they might like. LG gives users the option of turning the feature off, but LG said it has verified that its TVs continue to collect that information even if users opt out. LG looked into the issue after it was brought to its attention by a tech-savvy user . PHOTOS: Top 10 ways to take advantage of the 'sharing economy' "LG regrets any concerns these reports may have caused and will continue to strive to meet the expectations of all our customers and the public," the company said in a statement.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2013 | David Lazarus
A lot of people are sick of the money-grubbing spat between Time Warner Cable and CBS, which has resulted in CBS, Showtime and other channels being unavailable to the cable company's subscribers since Aug. 2. For Alan Ehrlich, this was the last straw. He decided to cut the cable cord. More and more people are doing the same. The U.S. pay-TV industry lost about 316,000 subscribers in the 12-month period that ended June 30, according to Moffett Research. "Cord cutting used to be an urban myth," said analyst Craig Moffett.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
There's little chance that HBO will offer its content online to non-TV subscribers in the U.S. any time soon. Home Box Office Chief Executive Officer Richard Plepler, in remarks at Nomura's Media & Telecommunications Summit in New York on Thursday, said the company is focused on getting more U.S. households to subscribe rather than letting people pay to watch its content online without buying a satellite or cable TV package. “For right now, we have the right model for our business,” he said.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
Smart TV manufacturers need more intelligent marketing, according to a survey by Analysys Mason . Fewer than half of people who own a television set that comes with applications to stream content from the web have connected their TV directly to the Internet. That doesn't bode well for manufacturers looking to monetize television sets beyond the initial sale. Analysys Mason said the manufacturers, such as Samsung, LG and Sony, must improve their education of consumers, build simpler user interfaces and strike deals to bring more relevant applications into the TVs. Some cable providers also have said they would build applications for smart TVs. That could make the experience of watching television more seamless for users.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Roku Inc., which makes devices to stream online content on television sets, said Wednesday it has received $60 million from investors including New York publishing giant Hearst Corp. The Saratoga, Calif., company said the Series F round was led by a "leading institutional investor," which the company did not name. The round included participation by BSkyB and News Corp., in addition to Hearst. The Apple TV competitor said the new funding will help it build its streaming software and services businesses.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Kicking off a day of TV announcements at CES, LG said its 55-inch OLED HD TV, the first big screen set of its kind, will make its way to the U.S. in March for $12,000. OLED, which stands for organic light-emitting diode, is considered one of the next steps in TV technology as it provides clearer images than other display technologies. OLED technology also allows manufacturers to produce thinner TV sets. The LG model, for example, is 0.16 inches thin. LG announced its OLED HD TV set earlier this month and began taking preorders for it in South Korea.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
There's little chance that HBO will offer its content online to non-TV subscribers in the U.S. any time soon. Home Box Office Chief Executive Officer Richard Plepler, in remarks at Nomura's Media & Telecommunications Summit in New York on Thursday, said the company is focused on getting more U.S. households to subscribe rather than letting people pay to watch its content online without buying a satellite or cable TV package. “For right now, we have the right model for our business,” he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
After many false starts, television is becoming an interactive medium. In a sense, it's always been one - even two channels require a choice. Long accustomed to the illusion that the screen is a window through which we are sometimes directly addressed, we are well prepared to be actually watched by it: The TV of the immediate future will be pointing a camera at you. It will know your face. It will see you when you're watching, and it will tell you what you want to watch. As you may have already experienced with Netflix or Amazon, it will often be on target.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
For decades we've been watching TV. Now a new generation of televisions is beginning to watch us. Technological advances are giving the old clunky "boob tube" an I.Q. injection. Some of the new breed of smart TVs comes equipped with facial recognition technology of the kind used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, to "see" the images flickering on the screen and suggest new shows based on what you've been watching. Building on advances pioneered by the video game industry, some of the new TVs change channels with the sweep of the hand.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|