Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSmashbox Studios
IN THE NEWS

Smashbox Studios

FEATURED ARTICLES
IMAGE
September 7, 2008 | Emili Vesilind
Looks like the push from downtown denizens and the garment industry to bring L.A. Fashion Week back to its downtown roots has officially gained traction. Leanna Lewis, an organizer from the BOXeight fashion shows, is producing Downtown L.A. Fashion Week, a four-day event that's reportedly luring a few designers away from Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week at Smashbox Studios, the main event of L.A. Fashion Week. Kelly Nishimoto, Single, Eduardo Lucero, Chloe Dao and Jeffrey Sebelia (showing his new contemporary collection, Good Vig)
ARTICLES BY DATE
IMAGE
March 31, 2013 | By Nora Zelevansky
T-shirts were once novelty items: Disneyland giveaways for deeply uncool vacationers, concert keepsakes for the young and disheveled, kitschy thrift-store finds for young women with hair in Princess Leia buns. But in the last decade the garments have transcended that reputation, becoming refined wardrobe staples for everyone, everywhere. Arguably this phenomenon started in L.A., with C&C California. The T-shirt company launched in 2002 out of the homes of founders Cheyann Benedict and Claire Stansfield.
Advertisement
IMAGE
March 9, 2008 | Adam Tschorn, Times Staff Writer
A Pussycat Dolls lingerie show, a photo op with former porn star Jenna Jameson and the runway debut of "The Hills" star Lauren Conrad's new collection can mean only one thing: Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Los Angeles is back at Smashbox Studios. Like a television network shuffling its fall lineup for maximum effect, event organizers IMG Worldwide and Smashbox continue to dispense with the drama in favor of sizzle. The result? A week long on sex and celebrity, but short on the sort of bankable -- or even recognizable -- designers needed to give the week resonance beyond the next cycle of supermarket tabloids.
IMAGE
October 10, 2010 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
We've just come off a global jaunt through the fashion capitals of New York, Milan and Paris, with several weeks of runway shows. Now what about L.A.? To the armchair fashionista, it may seem puzzling that a metropolis that's home to so many fashion designers, stylists and companies that churn out a variety of things from blue jeans to ball gowns is entering its third consecutive year without the kind of tightly organized, highly visible and media-saturated cadre of high-caliber runway shows that are staged twice a year or more in other cities.
IMAGE
March 31, 2013 | By Nora Zelevansky
T-shirts were once novelty items: Disneyland giveaways for deeply uncool vacationers, concert keepsakes for the young and disheveled, kitschy thrift-store finds for young women with hair in Princess Leia buns. But in the last decade the garments have transcended that reputation, becoming refined wardrobe staples for everyone, everywhere. Arguably this phenomenon started in L.A., with C&C California. The T-shirt company launched in 2002 out of the homes of founders Cheyann Benedict and Claire Stansfield.
IMAGE
March 14, 2010 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
Ever since the five-year partnership between events producer IMG and Smashbox Studios ended in October 2008, Los Angeles Fashion Week has languished without a lead event. Groups of every stripe have rushed in to fill the void, culminating in last fall's fashion month, which nearly spanned October. Five months later, the fashion feast has turned to famine, and most of the groups that have staged runway events in past seasons have dropped off the calendar — including the organizers of Downtown Los Angeles Fashion Week.
IMAGE
September 7, 2008 | Erin Weinger, Times Staff Writer
Now that architectural fashion is making a comeback for fall, Resurrection -- the bicoastal vintage boutique owned by designer Katy Rodriguez and partner Mark Haddawy -- is teaming up with luxury auctioneer Christie's to clear out pieces by Courreges, Cardin, Versace and more. Can't make it to London for the Oct. 30 sale? Fret not. Through Oct. 17, Resurrection's L.A. outpost will feature a massive selection of conceptual, 1990s looks from Comme des Garcons, Yohji Yamamoto, Issey Miyake and Undercover.
IMAGE
October 10, 2010 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
We've just come off a global jaunt through the fashion capitals of New York, Milan and Paris, with several weeks of runway shows. Now what about L.A.? To the armchair fashionista, it may seem puzzling that a metropolis that's home to so many fashion designers, stylists and companies that churn out a variety of things from blue jeans to ball gowns is entering its third consecutive year without the kind of tightly organized, highly visible and media-saturated cadre of high-caliber runway shows that are staged twice a year or more in other cities.
NEWS
April 25, 1996 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Picture this: The Stone Temple Pilots converge in the back of a white stretch limo being used as a prop for a Rolling Stone layout. Across the hall, body double Shelley Michelle poses au naturel for In Style. Next door, models with shiny-as-a-new-penny hair work on a Paul Mitchell ad.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2003 | Michael Quintanilla, Times Staff Writer
Dean Factor is on his knees, taping down a rug that many of his stiletto-heeled guests have been tripping over. Minutes later, his older brother, Davis, helps a crew set up a runway sign for designer Michael Ball as a fashion-craved crowd practically stampedes in. You'd think the brothers Factor, great-grandsons of legendary makeup guru Max Factor and owners of their own successful cosmetics line, would rather be holding court with L.A.'s fashion mavens here at their SmashBox Studios.
IMAGE
March 14, 2010 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
Ever since the five-year partnership between events producer IMG and Smashbox Studios ended in October 2008, Los Angeles Fashion Week has languished without a lead event. Groups of every stripe have rushed in to fill the void, culminating in last fall's fashion month, which nearly spanned October. Five months later, the fashion feast has turned to famine, and most of the groups that have staged runway events in past seasons have dropped off the calendar — including the organizers of Downtown Los Angeles Fashion Week.
IMAGE
September 7, 2008 | Erin Weinger, Times Staff Writer
Now that architectural fashion is making a comeback for fall, Resurrection -- the bicoastal vintage boutique owned by designer Katy Rodriguez and partner Mark Haddawy -- is teaming up with luxury auctioneer Christie's to clear out pieces by Courreges, Cardin, Versace and more. Can't make it to London for the Oct. 30 sale? Fret not. Through Oct. 17, Resurrection's L.A. outpost will feature a massive selection of conceptual, 1990s looks from Comme des Garcons, Yohji Yamamoto, Issey Miyake and Undercover.
IMAGE
September 7, 2008 | Emili Vesilind
Looks like the push from downtown denizens and the garment industry to bring L.A. Fashion Week back to its downtown roots has officially gained traction. Leanna Lewis, an organizer from the BOXeight fashion shows, is producing Downtown L.A. Fashion Week, a four-day event that's reportedly luring a few designers away from Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week at Smashbox Studios, the main event of L.A. Fashion Week. Kelly Nishimoto, Single, Eduardo Lucero, Chloe Dao and Jeffrey Sebelia (showing his new contemporary collection, Good Vig)
IMAGE
March 9, 2008 | Adam Tschorn, Times Staff Writer
A Pussycat Dolls lingerie show, a photo op with former porn star Jenna Jameson and the runway debut of "The Hills" star Lauren Conrad's new collection can mean only one thing: Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Los Angeles is back at Smashbox Studios. Like a television network shuffling its fall lineup for maximum effect, event organizers IMG Worldwide and Smashbox continue to dispense with the drama in favor of sizzle. The result? A week long on sex and celebrity, but short on the sort of bankable -- or even recognizable -- designers needed to give the week resonance beyond the next cycle of supermarket tabloids.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2003 | Michael Quintanilla, Times Staff Writer
Dean Factor is on his knees, taping down a rug that many of his stiletto-heeled guests have been tripping over. Minutes later, his older brother, Davis, helps a crew set up a runway sign for designer Michael Ball as a fashion-craved crowd practically stampedes in. You'd think the brothers Factor, great-grandsons of legendary makeup guru Max Factor and owners of their own successful cosmetics line, would rather be holding court with L.A.'s fashion mavens here at their SmashBox Studios.
NEWS
April 25, 1996 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Picture this: The Stone Temple Pilots converge in the back of a white stretch limo being used as a prop for a Rolling Stone layout. Across the hall, body double Shelley Michelle poses au naturel for In Style. Next door, models with shiny-as-a-new-penny hair work on a Paul Mitchell ad.
MAGAZINE
February 20, 2005
Styled by Lisa Michelle; hair: Peter Savic/Solo Artists; makeup: Frank B/Wall Group; model: Michelle Hicks/IMG Models. Location: Joshua Tree National Park and Smashbox Studios. Head wraps created from wool fabric from International Silks & Woolens, Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2005
Most of the modeling in L.A. this week has been for the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week at Smashbox Studios, but there was fashion on parade elsewhere here Thursday. Designer Oscar de la Renta rolled out some of his 2006 spring and summer line for an event called "Couture Cares: A Benefit for Breast Cancer," a luncheon and fashion show held at a private home in Los Angeles to raise money for the Revlon/UCLA Breast Center.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|