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Smile Movie

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NEWS
April 7, 2005 | Martha Groves, Times Staff Writer
Jeffrey Kramer had an inkling that his teenage daughter's 2002 trip to the Philippines on a medical mercy mission would have its life-altering aspects. He didn't realize that one of the lives most changed would be his. Kramer's feature film debut, "Smile," opens Friday in Los Angeles and San Francisco before rolling out nationally.
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NEWS
April 7, 2005 | Martha Groves, Times Staff Writer
Jeffrey Kramer had an inkling that his teenage daughter's 2002 trip to the Philippines on a medical mercy mission would have its life-altering aspects. He didn't realize that one of the lives most changed would be his. Kramer's feature film debut, "Smile," opens Friday in Los Angeles and San Francisco before rolling out nationally.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1989 | DANIEL CERONE
Sitting in the '50s-style diner booth in her kitchen, film writer and director Amy Heckerling glanced at the clock on the wall. It was almost 5 p.m., when she was scheduled to meet with an executive at Disney. Heckerling has been forced to become something of a clock-watcher ever since her prenatal baby film "Look Who's Talking" burst fall box-office records when it opened two weeks ago. In the days since, she has been courted by just about every studio in town.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1996 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comedy is frequently overlooked when prizes are handed out. But when nominations for the 48th annual Writers Guild of America Awards were announced Thursday, the genre was once again king. In the original screenplay category, the guild honored Aaron Sorkin's "The American President," Amy Heckerling's sleeper hit "Clueless," Woody Allen's "Mighty Aphrodite" and P.J. Hogan's bittersweet "Muriel's Wedding"--allotting the fifth slot to Randall Wallace's 13th century epic "Braveheart."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1994 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Koepp, co-author of Ron Howard's "The Paper," is an industry anomaly: a happy screenwriter. In a town that routinely relegates scripts to development hell, seven of those he has written or co-written have surfaced on the big screen in the past six years. "I'm incredibly spoiled," admits the Wisconsinite, whose squeaky-clean look and self-deprecating air set him apart from many Hollywood hustlers. "The real challenge will be the next five years when none of my scripts get made.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1996 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comedy is frequently overlooked when prizes are handed out. But when nominations for the 48th annual Writers Guild of America Awards were announced Thursday, the genre was once again king. In the original screenplay category, the guild honored Aaron Sorkin's "The American President," Amy Heckerling's sleeper hit "Clueless," Woody Allen's "Mighty Aphrodite" and P.J. Hogan's bittersweet "Muriel's Wedding"--allotting the fifth slot to Randall Wallace's 13th century epic "Braveheart."
NATIONAL
February 29, 2004 | Rachel Abramowitz and John Horn, Times Staff Writers
Backstage at the Kodak Theatre three days before the Academy Awards, Oscar producer Joe Roth is swimming in Hollywood royalty. Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg have just finished rehearsing their speeches. Renee Zellweger waits for her run-through in the green room. At this very moment, Roth's as popular as anyone in show business could ever be. You would never know he needs a hit.
SPORTS
July 4, 2000 | J.A. ADANDE
Just to get this straight, the sun did not set on the British Empire on Monday. Mark Philippoussis turned out the lights. With the brightness fading from the skies above Centre Court, Philippoussis took out Great Britain's last hope, Tim Henman. Philippoussis, the Australian with the big serve, fought through the partisan crowd and fought through the fatigue of his second consecutive five-set match to prevail, 6-1, 5-7, 6-7 (9), 6-3, 6-4, and advance to the Wimbledon quarterfinals.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1987 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
"Amazing Grace and Chuck" (selected theaters) ends with the question, "Wouldn't it be nice?"--which nicely sets off its intentions and boundaries. It wants to be a fairy tale, an idealistic fantasy about the world's children and athletes triumphing over the forces of war. Would that it were. Would that it worked. Ah, wouldn't it be nice? . . . But the movie has too many thin gimmicks and conflicting ideas: It ends as a jumble of naivete and gigantism, good will crashed on the shoals of formula.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1993 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If recreational sex these days is a battlefield, then Rebecca De Mornay and Don Johnson, the stars of "Guilty as Sin" (citywide), come off as a couple of erotic samurai. * Playing a hotshot female defense attorney and her randy client, an accused wife-killer, these two use sexiness as a weapon: ripping each other with a glance, thrusting with an innuendo, parrying with a smile.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1994 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Koepp, co-author of Ron Howard's "The Paper," is an industry anomaly: a happy screenwriter. In a town that routinely relegates scripts to development hell, seven of those he has written or co-written have surfaced on the big screen in the past six years. "I'm incredibly spoiled," admits the Wisconsinite, whose squeaky-clean look and self-deprecating air set him apart from many Hollywood hustlers. "The real challenge will be the next five years when none of my scripts get made.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1989 | DANIEL CERONE
Sitting in the '50s-style diner booth in her kitchen, film writer and director Amy Heckerling glanced at the clock on the wall. It was almost 5 p.m., when she was scheduled to meet with an executive at Disney. Heckerling has been forced to become something of a clock-watcher ever since her prenatal baby film "Look Who's Talking" burst fall box-office records when it opened two weeks ago. In the days since, she has been courted by just about every studio in town.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2002 | EMILY POLSBY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Note: Aspiring screenwriter Emily Polsby attended the Fade In magazine pitch festival last month in West Hollywood. Here's what happened: * "It's the story of my life, and our Lord Jesus Christ told me DreamWorks was going to produce it," the fiftysomething woman in line ahead of me said, her reflective American flag cap blinding me as she leaned forward into my face. "Do you have a relationship with God?"
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