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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
Melding the urban legend to the Internet meme, the film "Smiley," directed by young YouTube auteur Michael Gallagher from a script he co-wrote with Glasgow Phillips, is a surprisingly effective low-budget horror film that takes as its true villain the casual cynicism and nihilistic misanthropy that so often go along with online culture. In the film, a story circulates among a group of college kids that typing the phrase "I did it for the lulz" - meaning just for kicks - three times while chatting online with a stranger will cause a grotesque creature to suddenly appear and kill the stranger.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2014 | By Bob Pool
Steve Apostolof had a frown on his face as he drove past Happy Face Hill. The hillside features a 150-foot-wide smiley face that was created in 1998 by a man armed with a weed-whacker and a sprayer of herbicide. Since then, it has become something of a curiosity piece that welcomes motorists on the 118 Freeway to Simi Valley. But in the January dusk, Apostolof couldn't see Happy Face Hill, let alone its enormous grin. "With the sun setting early, the hill was pitch-black," Apostolof said of his trip home from work.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1986 | MARK LANDSBAUM, Times Staff Writer
All night Tuesday Robert Smiley was afraid the "do not scratch off" portion of his lottery ticket would scratch off and invalidate his big break. Smiley, 28, of Tustin, who drives a car nearly as old as he is and earns about $20,000 a year working two jobs, had become the state's first $100,000 instant lottery winner.
SCIENCE
March 3, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Drought or no drought, utilities across California are campaigning to get homeowners to reduce outdoor water use, which often constitutes at least half of a household's water consumption. One of the largest urban retail water agencies in the state is pursuing a new strategy in that effort:  “Behavioral water efficiency.” The East Bay Municipal Utility District, which serves 1.3 million customers in the east San Francisco Bay Area, is expanding a pilot program that provides individual residential customers with water report cards, showing how their use compares with similar-sized households in the area.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2007
WHAT'S remarkable about the cast of "The Real Housewives of Orange County" is not that they are exceptional in any way, but that they are oblivious to what's behind their appeal: They are horrible people ["They're Busting Out of the O.C." March 11]. Add delusional and falsely entitled and you have a trifecta for Bravo television. Reality TV "stars" may think they're smart, but an audience knows better. It's probably inaccurate when Smiley states, "They hate the fact that we've figured out how to take exposure from the show and turn it into something."
TRAVEL
November 14, 2004
We enjoyed the article "N.Y., Now in Season" [Oct. 17] on New York's wonderful Hudson Valley. But it didn't mention a unique resort, which has an amazing Southern California connection. Mohonk Mountain House in the Hudson Valley was founded in 1869. This legendary place of charm and grace remains, to this day, a secluded, unspoiled resort nestled in pristine wilderness and honored as a national historic landmark. Envisioned and developed by the Smiley twins, Alfred and Albert, beginning in 1869, the resort continues to be run by the fifth generation of the Smiley family.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
Reports from Bloomberg and the Financial Times say dozens of people became sick after eating last month at Noma in Copenhagen, known for its modern Nordic cuisine and often referred to as "the best restaurant in the world. " Danish food inspectors said 63 diners who ate there from Feb. 12 to 16 were ill with vomiting and diarrhea and a kitchen employee also was sickened.  [ Correction, March 9: An earlier version of this post cited a report stating 63 of a total 78 diners were affected; there were a total of 435 guests.]
SPORTS
September 22, 1997 | Associated Press
Witnesses who saw Cleveland pitcher John Smiley suffer a broken arm near the shoulder the night before were still somewhat in shock Sunday. "I'd never seen anything like it," Indian pitching coach Mark Wiley said. Reliever Jason Jacome said, "My stomach turned." The 32-year-old left-hander, who figured in the Indians' postseason plans, was preparing to face the Royals in Kansas City on Saturday night in his first start since tendinitis in his left shoulder and elbow sidelined him Aug. 30.
SPORTS
December 17, 2003 | Paul Gutierrez, Times Staff Writer
Senior guard Roy Smiley's rehabilitation from a broken leg has not gone as hoped and the three-point specialist's career apparently is in doubt. Smiley broke his left leg in the Pacific 10 Conference tournament title game against Oregon in March and has not played since. The Trojans, who are shooting 26% from three-point territory, could desperately use the services of a sound Smiley, who shot 34.5% from beyond the arc last season but now is bothered by ankle and knee problems.
SPORTS
January 4, 2003 | Paul Gutierrez, Times Staff Writer
Ever since he set foot on USC's campus and his transfer from a small junior college in Middle America was complete, Roy Smiley has had this day circled on his calendar. The reason: The junior swingman would be playing his first Division I basketball game in his hometown ... for the opposition. "I was a well-known player in the area," said Smiley, a Seattle native who led Garfield High to a state title as a senior.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2013
Firefighters from the Riverside County and Redlands fire departments were battling a 100-acre wildland fire Saturday afternoon in Reche Canyon, north of Moreno Valley. The blaze, known as the Smiley Fire, was first reported around 3 p.m. Located at the intersection of Smiley Boulevard and Vista Suelto Road, it was burning at a “moderate rate,” according to a dispatch from the Riverside County Fire Department and the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. As of 4:30 p.m., no one had been evacuated from the area, and no structures were under threat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Fire crews continued battling the Smiley fire north of Moreno Valley on Saturday evening. The 124-acre blaze, located in wildland area between Moreno Valley and Redlands, was 75% contained as of 7:45 p.m. Jody Hagemann, public information officer for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection and the Riverside County Fire Department, said officials estimated it would be fully contained by 10 p.m. Crews planned to remain on...
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
Reports from Bloomberg and the Financial Times say dozens of people became sick after eating last month at Noma in Copenhagen, known for its modern Nordic cuisine and often referred to as "the best restaurant in the world. " Danish food inspectors said 63 diners who ate there from Feb. 12 to 16 were ill with vomiting and diarrhea and a kitchen employee also was sickened.  [ Correction, March 9: An earlier version of this post cited a report stating 63 of a total 78 diners were affected; there were a total of 435 guests.]
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
Melding the urban legend to the Internet meme, the film "Smiley," directed by young YouTube auteur Michael Gallagher from a script he co-wrote with Glasgow Phillips, is a surprisingly effective low-budget horror film that takes as its true villain the casual cynicism and nihilistic misanthropy that so often go along with online culture. In the film, a story circulates among a group of college kids that typing the phrase "I did it for the lulz" - meaning just for kicks - three times while chatting online with a stranger will cause a grotesque creature to suddenly appear and kill the stranger.
NEWS
January 5, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
To say Gary Oldman has had an up-and-down career is like saying Sid Vicious was a slightly influential musician. In nearly three decades of acting, Oldman has had landmark turns — as Lee Harvey Oswald in "JFK," as the pimp Drexl Spivey in "True Romance" and, of course, as a certain tragic punk rocker in "Sid & Nancy. " He's also had years of career inactivity and disappointment — not to mention a tumultuous personal life that included a child custody battle and, at one point, a self-confessed alcohol addiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2011 | By Richard Rayner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
During the writing of an early draft of "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy," recalls John le Carré in an introduction to his classic spy novel, now reissued by Penguin Books along with a selection of his other works, he was banging his head against the wall. For a long time, he tried to make the story of a quest to ferret out a double agent in the British secret service succeed without flashbacks. After months of frustration, Le Carré took the manuscript into his garden and burned it. Such is the diligence of the master craftsman.
SPORTS
November 28, 1999 | ERIC SONDHEIMER
When students sign up to play boys' basketball at Crescenta Valley High, they better be prepared to learn more than just layup drills and how to run a 2-2-1 zone press. Each player has to write a letter to his teacher promising to be "an exceptional student in both effort and behavior."
MAGAZINE
February 12, 2006 | Colin Westerbeck
1891 * Friend's work is on display at the Michael Dawson Gallery, 535 N. Larchmont Blvd., Los Angeles, through March 11 * Appealing to the 19th century's favorite California myth, Redlands developers named their new plan the Alessandro tract, after a character in Helen Hunt Jackson's "Ramona." This picture shows that Herve Friend, whom they had hired to photograph the area, entered into the romantic spirit of things.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2011 | Richard Rayner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
First published in 1974, John le Carré's "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy" (Penguin: 400 pp., $16) deals with the quest to ferret out a double agent within the highest levels of the British secret service. The novel's plot weaves together a backward-looking investigation, drawing in the testimony of witnesses, case files and detailed memories, while moving swiftly forward toward danger, pursuit, entrapment and resolution. In his introduction to this edition, Le Carré reveals that in its earliest drafts he tried to make the story move without flashbacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2010 | By Scott Collins, Los Angeles Times
Everywhere Tavis Smiley travels around Southern California these days, people stop him with concerned expressions on their faces. He says they wonder about his nightly talk show and blow off some steam about KCET-TV Channel 28, the major Los Angeles PBS outlet for 40 years and Smiley's home studio for the last seven, which is exiting the public-broadcasting network just five weeks from now. "If the viewer in Southern California, if the viewer in...
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