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Smith Hempstone

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NEWS
December 6, 1992 | From Associated Press
The U.S. ambassador to Kenya cautioned the State Department this month not to "embrace the Somali tar baby" by sending in troops and risking casualties at the hands of "natural-born guerrillas," a national magazine reported Saturday. U.S. News & World Report said it obtained a diplomatic cable written by Smith Hempstone in which the ambassador urged that no troops be sent to Somalia, whose chaotic condition he said was beyond "the quick fix so beloved of Americans."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2006 | From the Washington Post
Smith Hempstone Jr., a conservative syndicated columnist who as U.S. ambassador to Kenya from 1989 to 1993 became an effective, aggressively undiplomatic critic of the country's ruler, Daniel arap Moi, died Sunday at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, Md., after suffering complications from diabetes. He was 77. He was credited with helping to introduce multiparty elections in an African country that, although an American ally, had little tolerance for political dissent.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2006 | From the Washington Post
Smith Hempstone Jr., a conservative syndicated columnist who as U.S. ambassador to Kenya from 1989 to 1993 became an effective, aggressively undiplomatic critic of the country's ruler, Daniel arap Moi, died Sunday at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, Md., after suffering complications from diabetes. He was 77. He was credited with helping to introduce multiparty elections in an African country that, although an American ally, had little tolerance for political dissent.
OPINION
October 10, 1993 | SMITH HEMPSTONE, Smith Hempstone, a Bush political appointee and former newspaper editor, was ambassador to Kenya, 1989-93; he now teaches at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tenn
When it comes to Somalia, President Clinton still doesn't get it. There is nothing wrong with his plan, revealed in a nationally televised speech on Thursday, to reinforce our 4,700 troops in Somalia. He is sending 1,700 soldiers equipped with 104 armored vehicles and additional aircraft, and will station the aircraft carrier Abraham Lincoln and 3,600 Marines offshore under American command. The presence of these additional troops and their equipment will enhance the security of those ashore.
OPINION
October 10, 1993 | SMITH HEMPSTONE, Smith Hempstone, a Bush political appointee and former newspaper editor, was ambassador to Kenya, 1989-93; he now teaches at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tenn
When it comes to Somalia, President Clinton still doesn't get it. There is nothing wrong with his plan, revealed in a nationally televised speech on Thursday, to reinforce our 4,700 troops in Somalia. He is sending 1,700 soldiers equipped with 104 armored vehicles and additional aircraft, and will station the aircraft carrier Abraham Lincoln and 3,600 Marines offshore under American command. The presence of these additional troops and their equipment will enhance the security of those ashore.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A leading political dissident who had taken refuge in the U.S. Embassy here from a government crackdown last week left the country late Wednesday under U.S. auspices, the embassy said. Gibson Kamau Kuria, 43, a lawyer, was one of the most prominent opposition figures still at large after a police roundup of proponents of a multi-party system here when he sought temporary asylum in the embassy and asked for assistance in leaving the country.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1985
The Washington Times announced Tuesday that Arnaud de Borchgrave, a former chief foreign correspondent and senior editor at Newsweek magazine, will succeed Smith Hempstone as its editor in chief. Hempstone will become associate editor of the 3-year-old, politically conservative daily newspaper. The announcement was made by Bo Hi Pak, president of News World Communications Inc., the New York-based company closely associated with the Rev. Sun Myung Moon, founder of the Unification Church.
NEWS
August 22, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. and Kenyan governments on Friday averted a showdown over an American relief airlift to Somalia and northern Kenya, clearing the way for two flights during the day to aid refugees and displaced persons in Kenyan camps. But there was still no indication of when the first flights might be made into Somalia, where more than 1.5 million people face imminent starvation. The Kenya-U.S. agreement came a day after Kenya protested what it called a violation of its airspace by U.S.
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Human rights around the world took a back seat in the Bush White House during 1991, the Human Rights Watch said in its ninth annual report released Saturday. Against weak nations where no U.S. economic or political interests were at stake, the Administration took a bold line in defense of human rights, the New York-based independent monitoring organization said.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Authorities broke up a Kenyan pro-democracy rally Saturday by arresting six of its organizers as they arrived at the Nairobi site. Thousands of onlookers were dispersed with tear gas, clubs and gunfire. The action by Kenyan police and government paramilitary units brought to 14 the number of opposition political leaders arrested in a two-day crackdown. At least one onlooker was shot in the thigh Saturday during skirmishes near the meeting grounds.
NEWS
December 6, 1992 | From Associated Press
The U.S. ambassador to Kenya cautioned the State Department this month not to "embrace the Somali tar baby" by sending in troops and risking casualties at the hands of "natural-born guerrillas," a national magazine reported Saturday. U.S. News & World Report said it obtained a diplomatic cable written by Smith Hempstone in which the ambassador urged that no troops be sent to Somalia, whose chaotic condition he said was beyond "the quick fix so beloved of Americans."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1998 | JAMES E. ROGAN, Rep. James E. Rogan (R-Glendale) represents the 27th Congressional District
On the evening of July 23 as I was leaving an event, I saw my friend, Special Agent John Gibson, sitting in his parked car waiting for the man he was assigned to protect, House Majority Whip Tom DeLay. John grinned and waved; I called out, "Good night, John. See 'ya tomorrow." That "tomorrow" brought tragedy. John Gibson and Capitol Police Officer Jacob "J.J" Chestnut were killed in the line of duty July 24 while guarding the U.S. Capitol from a crazed gunman.
NEWS
August 21, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. emergency airlift to Somalia announced with great fanfare by President Bush a week ago is getting off to a shaky start because relief officials and organizations in Somalia and neighboring Kenya were caught unaware that the program was being undertaken. Also left uninformed was the Kenyan government, which on Thursday protested what it called the U.S. failure to request prior clearance for military flights into its airspace.
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