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Smith Wesson Corp

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BUSINESS
June 6, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gun Maker Settles Bias Complaint: Smith & Wesson Corp. has settled a federal discrimination complaint by agreeing to pay up to $450,000 to 1,600 women it allegedly refused to hire, the U.S. Labor Department said. The Labor Department had filed a complaint alleging the gun maker broke federal contracting rules in barring women from two entry-level factory positions between 1985 and 1987.
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BUSINESS
November 27, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Smith & Wesson Holding Corp., the oldest U.S. handgun maker, said the Securities and Exchange Commission was investigating the company's fiscal 2002 financial statements and restatement of earnings. Smith & Wesson said it intended to cooperate fully with the investigation. Company spokeswoman Amy Armstrong said she didn't have any other details on the investigation.
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BUSINESS
December 30, 1997 | From Associated Press
Smith & Wesson Corp. has a new product, and the company guarantees the police will appreciate its stopping power. It's not a .44 Magnum, or even a .357. It's a bicycle. The nation's largest maker of handguns has wheeled out a line of police bicycles complete with lights and sirens. David Sargeant, business manager for the closely held Springfield, Mass.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2003 | From Associated Press
Smith & Wesson, one of the country's most recognizable brands, is taking aim at consumers' love of the American West by going into the catalog business selling cowboy-boot lamps and studded velvet jackets. Smith & Wesson Holding Corp., the gun maker's Scottsdale, Ariz.-based parent company, wants to attract new customers with the launch today of the Crossings by Smith & Wesson catalog.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Smith & Wesson Holding Corp., the oldest U.S. handgun maker, said the Securities and Exchange Commission was investigating the company's fiscal 2002 financial statements and restatement of earnings. Smith & Wesson said it intended to cooperate fully with the investigation. Company spokeswoman Amy Armstrong said she didn't have any other details on the investigation.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2002 | Ralph Frammolino, Times Staff Writer
Some dream of beating weapons into plowshares. But handgun maker Smith & Wesson Corp. has something else in mind: golf clubs. The Springfield, Mass.-based firearm maker said it would take aim next year at the $1.3-billion golf club market by licensing its name and logo on irons, woods, drivers and putters. The move is one of 30 such agreements the firm has struck over the last several years to leverage "brand equity" and broaden the Smith & Wesson name beyond firearms.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2003 | From Associated Press
Smith & Wesson, one of the country's most recognizable brands, is taking aim at consumers' love of the American West by going into the catalog business selling cowboy-boot lamps and studded velvet jackets. Smith & Wesson Holding Corp., the gun maker's Scottsdale, Ariz.-based parent company, wants to attract new customers with the launch today of the Crossings by Smith & Wesson catalog.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2003 | Ralph Frammolino and Steve Berry, Times Staff Writers
Even the most ardent firearm lovers acknowledge that Smith & Wesson's new .50-caliber Magnum revolver is more gun than anyone needs. It has double the power of most assault rifles in America. Its kick can send a grown man reeling; a single bullet can drop a grizzly. It is so heavy and long that police say no criminal would dare try to hide it in his waistband. It will cost as much as $989. And gun buyers across the country can't wait to get their hands on it.
NEWS
December 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
Smith & Wesson, the nation's largest gun maker, agreed Monday to set aside 2% of nationwide firearms sales to develop safer guns and to make it impossible for the average 5-year-old to pull the trigger of one of its weapons. The agreement with the city of Boston mirrors one the company reached in March with the Clinton administration and some other states and cities. It promises external gun locks on new production and internal locks within two years.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2003 | Ralph Frammolino and Steve Berry, Times Staff Writers
Even the most ardent firearm lovers acknowledge that Smith & Wesson's new .50-caliber Magnum revolver is more gun than anyone needs. It has double the power of most assault rifles in America. Its kick can send a grown man reeling; a single bullet can drop a grizzly. It is so heavy and long that police say no criminal would dare try to hide it in his waistband. It will cost as much as $989. And gun buyers across the country can't wait to get their hands on it.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2002 | Ralph Frammolino, Times Staff Writer
Some dream of beating weapons into plowshares. But handgun maker Smith & Wesson Corp. has something else in mind: golf clubs. The Springfield, Mass.-based firearm maker said it would take aim next year at the $1.3-billion golf club market by licensing its name and logo on irons, woods, drivers and putters. The move is one of 30 such agreements the firm has struck over the last several years to leverage "brand equity" and broaden the Smith & Wesson name beyond firearms.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2001 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Smith & Wesson, a slumping icon of the American firearms industry, has been sold by its British owner for $15 million to a start-up developer of gun safety devices, Saf-T-Hammer Corp. of Scottsdale, Ariz. The nearly 150-year-old company is being jettisoned by Tomkins, which purchased the legendary gun maker in 1987 for more than $100 million. The low sale price reflects Smith & Wesson's continuing exposure to litigation over gun violence in U.S.
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Smith & Wesson Co., the world's top handgun maker, will get a $1.8-million grant from the Justice Department to develop a "smart gun" that would permit only the owner to fire the weapon, Massachusetts lawmakers said. Smith & Wesson said it will use the money to continue research into fingerprint-matching technology and an electronic system to prevent people besides the gun owner from firing the weapon.
NEWS
December 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
Smith & Wesson, the nation's largest gun maker, agreed Monday to set aside 2% of nationwide firearms sales to develop safer guns and to make it impossible for the average 5-year-old to pull the trigger of one of its weapons. The agreement with the city of Boston mirrors one the company reached in March with the Clinton administration and some other states and cities. It promises external gun locks on new production and internal locks within two years.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2000 | Associated Press
Smith & Wesson said it's cutting about 15% of its work force, blaming slumping sales and a boycott by buyers angry about its gun-safety deal with the government. The company, which is owned by Tomkins of Britain, said it would lay off about 125 employees, including some managers, at its plant in Springfield, Mass., within a week.
NEWS
April 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
Gun maker Smith & Wesson's pledge to adopt landmark safety and responsibility standards is winning it a lot of business from local government officials. In the two weeks since President Clinton praised the Springfield, Mass., gun maker for its stance, 65 cities and counties have pledged to make Smith & Wesson their preferred source for police handguns. Thirty-seven of those local jurisdictions joined the list Friday, including Oakland, Calif.; Kansas City, Mo.; and Buffalo, N.Y.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2000 | Associated Press
Smith & Wesson said it's cutting about 15% of its work force, blaming slumping sales and a boycott by buyers angry about its gun-safety deal with the government. The company, which is owned by Tomkins of Britain, said it would lay off about 125 employees, including some managers, at its plant in Springfield, Mass., within a week.
NEWS
June 27, 2000 | From Associated Press
The House narrowly beat back an effort Monday to scuttle the government's pact with the nation's largest gun manufacturer for the use of safety devices, a week after lawmakers sent a mixed message on the issue. By a 201-196 roll call, lawmakers rejected a provision that would have barred the Justice Department from enforcing the agreement reached last March between Smith & Wesson and federal, state and local officials.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
Government officials and Smith & Wesson pledged Thursday to work out differences over "clarifications" the gun maker posted on its Web site concerning its landmark settlement with the Clinton administration. The clarifications relate to a small portion of the agreement dealing with restrictions on gun show sales. The company said a requirement that its dealers make background checks and impose other restrictions on sales applies only to the sale of the gun maker's firearms.
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