Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSmithkline Beckman Corp
IN THE NEWS

Smithkline Beckman Corp

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
January 29, 1987
Robert F. Dee, chairman of Philadelphia-based SmithKline Beckman Corp., will retire April 22, the company announced. He has recommended President and Chief Executive Henry Wendt as his successor.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 22, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Three major U.S. drug makers posted first-quarter profits that matched or exceeded expectations Tuesday, as continued U.S. sales growth more than offset the effects of a stronger dollar. Schering-Plough Corp. and Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. narrowly beat Wall Street expectations while American Home Products hit the mark--all posting double-digit earnings growth from the 1997 first quarter.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 25, 1989
SmithKline Beckman Corp.: The Philadelphia-based pharmaceutical and eye- and skin-care company reported first-quarter profit of $130.2 million, down 22% from a year ago. Sales totaled $1.24 billion, up 7%. The results reflected the fact pharmaceutical sales were 5% lower than the 1988 first quarter.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1989 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
The newly merged company, SmithKline Beecham, is a prescription and over-the-counter drug company with more than $6.7 billion in annual revenues, second only to Merck & Co. Its headquarters will be in London with Beecham chief executive Robert Bauman retaining that title and SmithKline chief executive Henry Wendt shifting to chairman. As part of the merger, Irvine-based Allergan Inc. and Fullerton-based Beckman Instruments Inc.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1989 | JOHN CHARLES TIGHE, Times Staff Writer
Beckman Instruments Inc., a Fullerton-based maker of medical instruments, on Monday reported earnings of $10.7 million for the first quarter of 1989, an 8% increase from $9.9 million a year earlier. Revenue for the period increased 7% to $199 million, from $186.2 million. President Lou Rosso said in a prepared statement that the 1989 results contrast with an exceptionally strong 1988 first quarter, which included large, one-time orders that were part of a Japanese program to balance trade.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1989
SmithKline Beckman Corp.: The Philadelphia-based pharmaceutical and eye- and skin-care company reported first-quarter profit of $130.2 million, down 22% from a year ago. Sales totaled $1.24 billion, up 7%. The results reflected the fact pharmaceutical sales were 5% lower than the 1988 first quarter.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1989 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
Two weeks after revealing that they were in negotiations, SmithKline Beckman Corp. and Beecham Group PLC announced Wednesday that they have agreed to merge, creating the world's second-largest pharmaceutical company. The new British-based company, to be called SmithKline Beecham, would have worldwide sales of $6.7 billion in prescription and over-the-counter drugs and health-care products. Only Merck & Co. of Rahway, N.J., is larger. As part of the merger, Philadelphia-based SmithKline would spin off two profitable Orange County subsidiaries, Beckman Instruments in Fullerton and Allergan Inc. in Irvine.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1989 | From Reuters
Despite new rumors that SmithKline Beckman Corp. has other suitors to compete with Beecham Group, SmithKline and Beecham may announce a merger as early as next week, industry sources said Thursday. "The pressure is mounting for SmithKline and Beecham to reach a merger agreement since the companies disclosed that they were having merger discussions," said Hemant Shah, an independent analyst in Warren, N.J.
NEWS
February 3, 1987
SmithKline Beckman Corp. will give $7.8 million to Stanford University in hopes of advancing health-care technology, the company announced in Philadelphia. SmithKline said it pledged $5 million to the Palo Alto university for its new Molecular and Genetic Medicine Center and $2.8 million for research support. The company will have the right of first refusal to license any patented processes or products that result from projects funded by its research support.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1989 | JOHN O'DELL
Frenzied trading of SmithKline Beckman options led the Pacific Stock Exchange to invoke a little-used "closing rotation" rule Wednesday to help frazzled traders make sense of the day's action. The rule is invoked when an extraordinary level of trading makes it physically impossible for all buy and sell orders to be processed by the time the exchange closes at 1:10 p.m., said PSE spokesman Roy Berces.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1989 | JOHN O'DELL, Times Staff Writer
Frenzied trading of SmithKline Beckman options led the Pacific Stock Exchange to invoke the little-used "closing rotation" rule Wednesday to help frazzled traders make sense of the day's action. The rule is invoked when an extraordinary level of trading makes it physically impossible for all buy and sell orders to be processed by the exchange's closing time of 1:10 p.m., said PSE spokesman Roy Berces.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|