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BUSINESS
October 10, 2000 | Associated Press
British drug giant SmithKline Beecham said it's buying U.S.-based Block Drug Co. for $1.24 billion, adding such brands as Sensodyne toothpaste and Poli-Grip denture adhesive to its consumer health-care portfolio, which includes Aquafresh toothpaste. The deal would secure SmithKline's place among the world's biggest toothpaste manufacturers, behind Colgate-Palmolive Co. and Procter & Gamble Co. SmithKline Beecham is offering $53 each for all of Block's common shares.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- An appeals court will consider Wednesday whether gays and lesbians may be struck from federal jury pools because of their sexual orientation. The issue before the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeal arose in an antitrust dispute two years ago between two drug makers, Abbott Laboratories and SmithKline Beecham. An attorney for Abbott used a peremptory challenge to bump a man who had spoken of  his “partner.” Peremptory challenges do not require an explanation.
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BUSINESS
February 20, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pharmaceutical giant SmithKline Beecham has tentatively agreed to pay $325 million to settle allegations that its clinical laboratory business defrauded the U.S. government. If the agreement is approved, it would be one of the largest settlements in the government's ongoing investigation of health-care fraud and the largest from a clinical lab.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - A federal appeals court grappled Wednesday with whether a prohibition against excluding jurors because of race or gender should be extended to sexual orientation. During an hourlong hearing, a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals peppered lawyers with questions about the removal of a gay man during jury selection for an antitrust trial two years ago. The dispute between Abbott Laboratories and SmithKline Beecham involved Abbott's price hike for an AIDS drug, which had infuriated the gay community.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
A continuing federal fraud investigation and a price-fixing lawsuit by drug retailers cut deeply into the fourth-quarter profit of drug maker SmithKline Beecham. The company on Tuesday reported net income of $64 million, or 12 cents per U.S. share, after setting aside $395 million to help cover potential costs of the fraud investigation and a tentative settlement of the lawsuit. SmithKline is based in Middlesex, England; its U.S. headquarters are in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1994 | From Associated Press
Eastman Kodak Co. announced Monday that it has agreed to sell its remaining Sterling Winthrop business, including non-prescription remedies such as Bayer aspirin, to health care giant SmithKline Beecham for $2.925 billion in cash. The sale is among the latest in the consolidation of the health care industry, where companies are merging to gain products and cut costs as changes cut deeply into profits. In another deal announced Monday, Ivax Corp.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1993 | From Bloomberg Business News
British pharmaceutical shares got a big new-year lift from decisions last week by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to approve various drugs for sale in the world's biggest health care market. "At the end of the year, you always get a rush of approvals through" from the FDA, said Andrew Porter, drug analyst at Nikko Europe, the London branch of the Japanese broker.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
SmithKline Beecham said it is selling most of its remaining toiletries business to Sara Lee Corp. and Wella in order to focus on health care products.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - A federal appeals court appeared troubled Wednesday by the removal of gay and lesbian prospective jurors on the basis of their sexual orientation. During a hearing, a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals considered the issue in the context of an appeal from a jury verdict reached in a dispute between two drug makers, Abbott Laboratories and SmithKline Beecham. An attorney for Abbott used a peremptory challenge during a 2011 trial to dismiss a man who had spoken of his male partner during voir dire questioning.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2000 | From Reuters
Glaxo Wellcome and SmithKline Beecham completed their merger Wednesday to forge the world's leading drugs group by market share, nearly three years after the effort began. The new company, Glaxo-SmithKline, with a market capitalization of about $168.7 billion, has a lot to prove after a long and painful birth. A series of product setbacks raised concern that it will struggle to match the growth rates of its top rivals. The companies announced their merger plan Jan.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Glaxo Wellcome and SmithKline Beecham received conditional U.S. antitrust approval for their $73-billion merger on Monday, as the Federal Trade Commission deferred deciding whether the companies must sell off a quit-smoking product. The FTC said it will decide within 30 days whether the companies must make additional concessions as a condition of becoming the world's second-largest pharmaceutical company.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2000 | Associated Press
British drug giant SmithKline Beecham said it's buying U.S.-based Block Drug Co. for $1.24 billion, adding such brands as Sensodyne toothpaste and Poli-Grip denture adhesive to its consumer health-care portfolio, which includes Aquafresh toothpaste. The deal would secure SmithKline's place among the world's biggest toothpaste manufacturers, behind Colgate-Palmolive Co. and Procter & Gamble Co. SmithKline Beecham is offering $53 each for all of Block's common shares.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2000
* Drug groups Glaxo Wellcome and SmithKline Beecham were forced to delay completion of their merger for a second time as the Federal Trade Commission studied their hold on the smoking cessation market. The merger of the two British companies, creating the world's largest drug firm by market share, is now expected by year-end--nearly 12 months after it was announced. * Guide to Our Staff: Need to reach Business section reporters or editors?
BUSINESS
April 21, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
With the future of its promising blood-pressure drug now uncertain, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. may find itself an acquisition target or a merger player, some analysts say. Bristol-Myers' hopes of launching Vanlev, a hypertension pill that seemed destined for multibillion-dollar annual sales, were scuttled when federal officials raised concerns that it may cause severe facial swelling and impair breathing in some patients.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Over-the-Counter Version of Tagamet Gets FDA OK: Middlesex, England-based SmithKline Beecham said it received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for the blockbuster drug to treat heartburn, acid indigestion and sour stomach. Tagamet HB will be available early this fall, the company said.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2000 | DANE HAMILTON and KRISTIN JENSEN, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Pharmaceutical powerhouses Glaxo Wellcome and SmithKline Beecham agreed to merge and create the world's largest drug company in an all-stock transaction worth about $81.6 billion, people familiar with the situation said Sunday. The merger, expected to be announced today, would give Glaxo shareholders about 59% of the combined company, the people said. Glaxo SmithKline, the company's new name, would have a market value of about $186 billion, based on last week's closing share prices.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
British pharmaceutical heavyweights Glaxo Wellcome and SmithKline Beecham said Friday that they've resumed talks on a merger, which would create the world's largest drug maker if successful. The renewal of talks, which collapsed two years ago over differences between their top executives, highlights the pressure that even the biggest pharmaceutical firms are under to consolidate with industry rivals as a way to afford the rising costs of developing and selling new medicines.
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