Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSmithsonian American Art Museum
IN THE NEWS

Smithsonian American Art Museum

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2010 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
Early on in Steven Spielberg's 1987 "Empire of the Sun," before the Japanese invasion of Shanghai shatters the privileged world of the movie's young British hero, we see the boy in the comfort of his own bedroom. In the dim room, the mother's face glows as she tucks her son into bed, while the father, reading glasses and newspaper in hand, walks into the room and for a moment leans over both of them. The scene looks as though it's straight out of a Norman Rockwell painting. And it is just that, according to Spielberg.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
As a leading contemporary ceramic artist, Elsa Rady created elegantly simple porcelain vessels and often controlled how they were presented by bolting the refined pieces into place. "She really forged her own path and became a force," said Jo Lauria, an independent curator who included Rady's work in "Craft in America," a national touring show that debuted in 2007. "Calculating the experience of the viewer ? I don't know of any other artist who is her equal in that," Lauria said.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Richard Paul Wunder, 79, an art historian who held curatorial positions at the Cooper Union Museum in New York City and the Smithsonian in Washington, died Sunday at his home in La Jolla of an apparent heart attack. A native of Ardmore, Pa., Wunder developed an interest in art while traveling through Europe with his mother. His art studies at Harvard were interrupted by service in the army during World War II and later the Korean War.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2010 | By Claire Noland, Los Angeles Times
Rupert J. Deese, a longtime Claremont ceramicist who began producing functional decorative pottery with shapely forms and silky glazes during the Southern California postwar design boom, has died. He was 85. Deese died July 12 at Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center in Pomona of complications from arteriosclerotic disease, his daughter Mary Ann Brow said. His death came barely a month after that of his wife of 59 years, Helen Deese, a former English professor at Mount St. Mary's College in Los Angeles and UC Riverside.
TRAVEL
July 2, 2006 | Julia Ross, Special to The Times
ART lovers visiting the capital this summer should venture off the National Mall, because a new showcase for American art awaits in the city's revitalized Chinatown. The Smithsonian's Donald W. Reynolds Center for American Art and Portraiture was to reopen Saturday after a six-year, $283-million renovation. The center, the onetime home of the U.S. Patent Office, now houses the National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian American Art Museum under one roof.
NEWS
December 13, 2001
Last Chance Theater "Delirium Palace"--Playwright Gordon Dahlquist loves his oblique games. Irene (Lauren Campedelli) is being grilled by Pierson (Christian Leffler). She's amnesiac. She believes herself to be an American doctor, lost in some foreign port city. She remembers a red door, beckoning, and then a white room, people wearing headphones.... There's an archness to the writing, and before it's quite over, the play starts chasing its own tail. Yet it's highly stageworthy.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2002 | SCARLET CHENG
A deliriously decorated bauble hangs from the ceiling at the entry to the exhibition "Arte Latino: Treasures From the Smithsonian American Art Museum," just off the main lobby of the Palm Springs Desert Museum. Pepon Osorio's glass chandelier is encrusted with a fanciful jumble of pearls and colored beads, plastic swans and dolls, toy palm trees and even a few religious figures, including a priest and St. Christopher.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2008 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Ralph Bacerra, a ceramic artist who created teapots and other vessels, adorned them with geometric shapes and rich colors and helped revive interest in decorative surfaces, died of lung cancer Tuesday at his home in Eagle Rock. He was 70. One of Bacerra's best-known works of art is the 1989 “Teapot,” part of the collection at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. The piece was not created "to brew tea but to be enjoyed as a purely visual and tactile experience," the museum's description reads.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2010 | By Claire Noland, Los Angeles Times
Rupert J. Deese, a longtime Claremont ceramicist who began producing functional decorative pottery with shapely forms and silky glazes during the Southern California postwar design boom, has died. He was 85. Deese died July 12 at Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center in Pomona of complications from arteriosclerotic disease, his daughter Mary Ann Brow said. His death came barely a month after that of his wife of 59 years, Helen Deese, a former English professor at Mount St. Mary's College in Los Angeles and UC Riverside.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Times Art Critic
The fall art season in L.A.'s museums gets underway today with a merger between art and Hollywood movies: "Douglas Gordon," a survey at the Museum of Contemporary Art (through Jan. 20), includes the Scottish artist's video installations featuring digitalized manipulations of such classic films as "Psycho" and "Taxi Driver." The show, which will travel to New York and Washington, D.C., next year, also includes text works and sculpture.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2010 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
Early on in Steven Spielberg's 1987 "Empire of the Sun," before the Japanese invasion of Shanghai shatters the privileged world of the movie's young British hero, we see the boy in the comfort of his own bedroom. In the dim room, the mother's face glows as she tucks her son into bed, while the father, reading glasses and newspaper in hand, walks into the room and for a moment leans over both of them. The scene looks as though it's straight out of a Norman Rockwell painting. And it is just that, according to Spielberg.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2008 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Ralph Bacerra, a ceramic artist who created teapots and other vessels, adorned them with geometric shapes and rich colors and helped revive interest in decorative surfaces, died of lung cancer Tuesday at his home in Eagle Rock. He was 70. One of Bacerra's best-known works of art is the 1989 “Teapot,” part of the collection at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. The piece was not created "to brew tea but to be enjoyed as a purely visual and tactile experience," the museum's description reads.
TRAVEL
July 2, 2006 | Julia Ross, Special to The Times
ART lovers visiting the capital this summer should venture off the National Mall, because a new showcase for American art awaits in the city's revitalized Chinatown. The Smithsonian's Donald W. Reynolds Center for American Art and Portraiture was to reopen Saturday after a six-year, $283-million renovation. The center, the onetime home of the U.S. Patent Office, now houses the National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian American Art Museum under one roof.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Richard Paul Wunder, 79, an art historian who held curatorial positions at the Cooper Union Museum in New York City and the Smithsonian in Washington, died Sunday at his home in La Jolla of an apparent heart attack. A native of Ardmore, Pa., Wunder developed an interest in art while traveling through Europe with his mother. His art studies at Harvard were interrupted by service in the army during World War II and later the Korean War.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2002 | SCARLET CHENG
A deliriously decorated bauble hangs from the ceiling at the entry to the exhibition "Arte Latino: Treasures From the Smithsonian American Art Museum," just off the main lobby of the Palm Springs Desert Museum. Pepon Osorio's glass chandelier is encrusted with a fanciful jumble of pearls and colored beads, plastic swans and dolls, toy palm trees and even a few religious figures, including a priest and St. Christopher.
NEWS
January 1, 2002 | JO ANN LEWIS, WASHINGTON POST
Despite the prospect of millions of dollars in budget cuts, the Smithsonian Institution has great news for photography fans. It has launched a new initiative which, if it succeeds, will create a National Center for Photography at the museum complex. The idea, quietly hatched by Smithsonian photography curator Merry Foresta, will surface in May 2003: the first general survey of the Smithsonian's trove of 13 million photographs, at the Arts and Industries Building.
NEWS
January 1, 2002 | JO ANN LEWIS, WASHINGTON POST
Despite the prospect of millions of dollars in budget cuts, the Smithsonian Institution has great news for photography fans. It has launched a new initiative which, if it succeeds, will create a National Center for Photography at the museum complex. The idea, quietly hatched by Smithsonian photography curator Merry Foresta, will surface in May 2003: the first general survey of the Smithsonian's trove of 13 million photographs, at the Arts and Industries Building.
NEWS
December 13, 2001
Last Chance Theater "Delirium Palace"--Playwright Gordon Dahlquist loves his oblique games. Irene (Lauren Campedelli) is being grilled by Pierson (Christian Leffler). She's amnesiac. She believes herself to be an American doctor, lost in some foreign port city. She remembers a red door, beckoning, and then a white room, people wearing headphones.... There's an archness to the writing, and before it's quite over, the play starts chasing its own tail. Yet it's highly stageworthy.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|