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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
This post has been updated. Please see below for details. David J. Skorton, a cardiologist who's spent the past decade as president of Cornell University and the University of Iowa, will be the next head of the Smithsonian Institution starting in July 2015. Skorton, 64, will be the first physician to serve as secretary of the Smithsonian, a federal department that runs a diverse array of cultural sites and research programs literally extending from A (eight museums and galleries devoted to art and design)
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
This post has been updated. Please see below for details. David J. Skorton, a cardiologist who's spent the past decade as president of Cornell University and the University of Iowa, will be the next head of the Smithsonian Institution starting in July 2015. Skorton, 64, will be the first physician to serve as secretary of the Smithsonian, a federal department that runs a diverse array of cultural sites and research programs literally extending from A (eight museums and galleries devoted to art and design)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Recruiting a new leader for a big museum can take months - sometimes more than a year - involving search committees, consultants and rounds of interviews and negotiations. In the case of the Autry National Center of the American West, finding its fourth chief executive since opening 25 years ago was a much simpler affair. The biggest challenge was for board chair Marshall McKay, tired from a 12-hour day of meetings, to muster the energy to rush through a hotel corridor in Portland, Ore., catch up with the man he'd pegged as the Autry's next leader, and make him a proposal from out of the blue.
NEWS
December 17, 1997
Janet Annenberg Hooker, 93, philanthropist who gave money and rare jewels to the Smithsonian Institution. A daughter of Moses Annenberg, who founded Triangle Publications, Hooker contributed an estimated $9 million in cash and gems to the museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2010 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Think anti-gay bullying is just for kids? Ask the Smithsonian. Last week, Smithsonian Institution officials in Washington removed an artwork from an exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery. The critically acclaimed show's subject is a century of gay identity in art. The decision to remove the work caused an uproar. Coming after months of news reports of bullying and shocking teenage suicides, and in the week of a fresh Pentagon study supportive of gays and lesbians serving openly in the armed services, the context of the action speaks volumes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1990 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David beat back Goliath on Friday in the tiny seacoast village of Rockport, Mass. The dispute was between the small New England village and the venerable Smithsonian Institution. The issue was a $1-million bequest left to Rockport by longtime resident and millionaire Franz Denghausen.
BOOKS
March 15, 1998 | MERLE RUBIN, Merle Rubin is a writer and critic whose last essay for Book Review was a consideration of the work of Louis Auchincloss
In 1948, still in his early 20s, having already published two quite creditable works of fiction, Gore Vidal made literary history with "The City and the Pillar," the first mainstream American novel to treat homosexual desire as a natural, if not exactly commonplace, phenomenon in the life of a normal, red-blooded American male. In the 50 years since then, in an amazingly inventive variety of literary and even extra-literary forms, Vidal has continued his role as gadfly.
NEWS
November 4, 2003 | David Lukas
When President Theodore Roosevelt dedicated the first national wildlife refuge in 1903, there was little fanfare and little sense of what the future would hold. The fledgling refuge system was a unique idea with no precedent. Now 100 years strong, this simple notion of protecting land for wildlife has grown to include 538 refuges that encompass an astonishing 95 million acres -- there's nothing else quite like it in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2005 | Jacqueline Trescott, Washington Post
Spring is a beautiful thing for those who run the Smithsonian Institution. School breaks and cherry blossoms mean tourists -- and their money. "This is prime time for us now," Smithsonian spokeswoman Linda St. Thomas says. "You can see the out-of-town buses lined up on Jefferson Drive from the Castle all the way to the American Indian Museum." All those kids pouring into the museums are important to the Smithsonian because the Mall is increasingly becoming a mall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2011 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Ira Michael Heyman, a champion of affirmative action who led UC Berkeley as its chancellor during the 1980s and later became the first non-scientist to lead the Smithsonian Institution, has died. He was 81. Heyman died at his Berkeley home Saturday after a long battle with emphysema. The Smithsonian and the university announced his death Monday. During 10 years as UC Berkeley chancellor, Heyman increased minority representation in the student body and on the faculty, efforts that stirred considerable debate and controversy.
NATIONAL
May 6, 2011 | By Julie Mianecki, Washington Bureau
A federal commission has recommended construction of a museum on the National Mall honoring the history of American Latinos. The commission submitted a report to Congress and the White House on Thursday outlining the details of the proposed $600-million National Museum of the American Latino, which has been endorsed by Interior Secretary Ken Salazar. It would be part of the Smithsonian Institution, which already has a museum dedicated to American Indians and is planning another focusing on African Americans.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2010 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Think anti-gay bullying is just for kids? Ask the Smithsonian. Last week, Smithsonian Institution officials in Washington removed an artwork from an exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery. The critically acclaimed show's subject is a century of gay identity in art. The decision to remove the work caused an uproar. Coming after months of news reports of bullying and shocking teenage suicides, and in the week of a fresh Pentagon study supportive of gays and lesbians serving openly in the armed services, the context of the action speaks volumes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2009 | Suzanne Muchnic
"We often say, with great pride, that we are the world's largest museum and research complex," Wayne Clough says of the Smithsonian Institution. "Then I think, 'Well, so what GM?' It used to be the world's greatest carmaker. That doesn't guarantee you anything. We have to be very good at what we do."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2009 | Joanna Lin
Reading the Bible aloud, start to finish, takes about 77 hours. Writing by hand the entire holy book? Try six months. To celebrate the 30th anniversary of the New International Version of the Bible, the publishing house Zondervan is inviting people across the country to copy a verse in their own hand. "What better way than to let everyone participate?" said Moe Girkins, chief executive of Zondervan, the North American publisher of the NIV Bible, as it's commonly known.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2005 | Christopher Lee, Washington Post
Sharon Damon had visited before to tour the exhibits on crafts and culture, but it was another pursuit that brought her back to the National Museum of the American Indian this week: Christmas shopping. The Annandale, Va., resident hoped to find distinctive gifts for two friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2005 | Christopher Lee, Washington Post
Sharon Damon had visited before to tour the exhibits on crafts and culture, but it was another pursuit that brought her back to the National Museum of the American Indian this week: Christmas shopping. The Annandale, Va., resident hoped to find distinctive gifts for two friends.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | KATHLEEN HOWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An iconic life-size portrait of George Washington that was set to go on the auction block has been purchased by a Las Vegas philanthropic foundation that will display the painting on a nationwide tour before returning it to the Smithsonian Institution for permanent display. The Gilbert Stuart portrait of the nation's first president graced the entrance to the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery for more than 30 years before its British owner recently decided to put it up for sale.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2005 | Jacqueline Trescott, Washington Post
Spring is a beautiful thing for those who run the Smithsonian Institution. School breaks and cherry blossoms mean tourists -- and their money. "This is prime time for us now," Smithsonian spokeswoman Linda St. Thomas says. "You can see the out-of-town buses lined up on Jefferson Drive from the Castle all the way to the American Indian Museum." All those kids pouring into the museums are important to the Smithsonian because the Mall is increasingly becoming a mall.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2004 | Jacqueline Trescott, Washington Post
The papier-mache sculpture, all 10 feet tall, has curves that speak of movement, full hips and embracing arms. It also has several sets of eyes and faces that signal fun and seem to be showing new directions. The figure in black, red, gold and blue is probably male but maybe not. This whimsical and evocative work by Mickael Bethe-Selassie has a permanent home in Washington at the National Museum of African Art, right under the traffic of the busiest museum row in the world.
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