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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
This post has been updated. Please see below for details. David J. Skorton, a cardiologist who's spent the past decade as president of Cornell University and the University of Iowa, will be the next head of the Smithsonian Institution starting in July 2015. Skorton, 64, will be the first physician to serve as secretary of the Smithsonian, a federal department that runs a diverse array of cultural sites and research programs literally extending from A (eight museums and galleries devoted to art and design)
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By David Ng
The Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum - one of Washington's most reliable tourist attractions - is receiving a $30-million gift from Boeing and will use the money to renovate its main exhibition space that serves as home to such icons of aviation as the Wright Brothers' airplane and Charles Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis. Officials at the Smithsonian made the announcement Thursday, saying that the renovation is expected to be completed in 2016, the museum's 40th anniversary.
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NEWS
December 17, 1997
Janet Annenberg Hooker, 93, philanthropist who gave money and rare jewels to the Smithsonian Institution. A daughter of Moses Annenberg, who founded Triangle Publications, Hooker contributed an estimated $9 million in cash and gems to the museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
This post has been updated. Please see below for details. David J. Skorton, a cardiologist who's spent the past decade as president of Cornell University and the University of Iowa, will be the next head of the Smithsonian Institution starting in July 2015. Skorton, 64, will be the first physician to serve as secretary of the Smithsonian, a federal department that runs a diverse array of cultural sites and research programs literally extending from A (eight museums and galleries devoted to art and design)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1990 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David beat back Goliath on Friday in the tiny seacoast village of Rockport, Mass. The dispute was between the small New England village and the venerable Smithsonian Institution. The issue was a $1-million bequest left to Rockport by longtime resident and millionaire Franz Denghausen.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2005 | Jacqueline Trescott, Washington Post
Spring is a beautiful thing for those who run the Smithsonian Institution. School breaks and cherry blossoms mean tourists -- and their money. "This is prime time for us now," Smithsonian spokeswoman Linda St. Thomas says. "You can see the out-of-town buses lined up on Jefferson Drive from the Castle all the way to the American Indian Museum." All those kids pouring into the museums are important to the Smithsonian because the Mall is increasingly becoming a mall.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | KATHLEEN HOWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An iconic life-size portrait of George Washington that was set to go on the auction block has been purchased by a Las Vegas philanthropic foundation that will display the painting on a nationwide tour before returning it to the Smithsonian Institution for permanent display. The Gilbert Stuart portrait of the nation's first president graced the entrance to the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery for more than 30 years before its British owner recently decided to put it up for sale.
NEWS
December 17, 1993 | NANCY L. ROSS, WASHINGTON POST
Once upon a time when the nation's Capital was a simpler place, the head of the Smithsonian Institution lived over the store. The medieval-style red-brick castle on Jefferson Drive housed the first secretary, Joseph Henry, and his family from 1855 until his death in 1878.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2005 | Christopher Lee, Washington Post
Sharon Damon had visited before to tour the exhibits on crafts and culture, but it was another pursuit that brought her back to the National Museum of the American Indian this week: Christmas shopping. The Annandale, Va., resident hoped to find distinctive gifts for two friends.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2011 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Ira Michael Heyman, a champion of affirmative action who led UC Berkeley as its chancellor during the 1980s and later became the first non-scientist to lead the Smithsonian Institution, has died. He was 81. Heyman died at his Berkeley home Saturday after a long battle with emphysema. The Smithsonian and the university announced his death Monday. During 10 years as UC Berkeley chancellor, Heyman increased minority representation in the student body and on the faculty, efforts that stirred considerable debate and controversy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
G. Wayne Clough, who announced Wednesday that he will step down as the head of the Smithsonian Institution in October 2014, arrived at the museums at a time when it was threatened by scandals and a crumbling infrastructure. Clough, a civil engineer and former president of the Georgia Institute of Technology, joined the Smithsonian in July 2008. He has worked to bring the 167-year-old museums and research institution, which receive more than 30 million visitors per year, into the modern era. His predecessor as secretary, banker Lawrence M. Small, had resigned the previous year after it was revealed that he was using Smithsonian money to fund private travel and buy expensive gifts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
In the early 1900s, Alexander Graham Bell intensively researched ways to lift humans heavenward on kite-like flying machines. Now comes the decidedly earthbound postscript. The detailed archive that the telephone's inventor kept of his much later experiments in flight - more than 950 photographs and 217 pages of laboratory journals, many in Bell's own hand - was pulled back from the auction block at a hotel in Westlake Village on Wednesday, shortly before it was to go under the gavel.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
This post has been corrected. Please see below for details. A historic archive documenting Alexander Graham Bell's attempt in the early 1900s to build a kite-like aircraft that would allow humans to fly was pulled back from an auctioneer's gavel in Westlake Village on Wednesday. The Smithsonian Institution and National Geographic Society joined Bell's heirs in challenging the archive's sale. They raised questions about whether the telephone inventor's family had voluntarily transferred the archive to a Smithsonian curator in the mid-1950s for his personal use. Profiles in History, a Calabasas auction house specializing in historical documents and Hollywood memorabilia, had estimated in the online auction catalog that the 217 pages of laboratory notes and more than 950 unpublished photographs documenting Bell's manned-flight experiments would fetch as much as $150,000 in the auction at the Hyatt Westlake Plaza hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2013 | By David Ng
The Smithsonian Institution museums in Washington have had to close some spaces due to the effects of the federal budget cuts known as sequestration, the organization announced this week. The budget cuts have resulted in a reduction in a contract for security that supplements the Smithsonian security force, which in turn has necessitated the closure of certain spaces, the organization said. CHEAT SHEET: Spring Arts Preview Three locations have been affected: The Hirshhorn Museum is closing some sections of its permanent collection galleries; the National Museum of African Art is shutting down part of the permanent exhibition "African Mosaic"; and the Smithsonian Castle is closing its Commons space, used for displaying objects from around the institution's museums.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Recruiting a new leader for a big museum can take months - sometimes more than a year - involving search committees, consultants and rounds of interviews and negotiations. In the case of the Autry National Center of the American West, finding its fourth chief executive since opening 25 years ago was a much simpler affair. The biggest challenge was for board chair Marshall McKay, tired from a 12-hour day of meetings, to muster the energy to rush through a hotel corridor in Portland, Ore., catch up with the man he'd pegged as the Autry's next leader, and make him a proposal from out of the blue.
NATIONAL
October 1, 2012 | By Danielle Ryan
WASHINGTON -- A parking attendant has pleaded guilty to stealing at least $400,000 in visitor parking fees by undercounting vehicles entering the lot at the Smithsonian Institution's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. Meseret Terefe, 36, an employee of Parking Management Inc., worked as a booth attendant at the Udvar-Hazy Center, which is the annex location of the Air & Space Museum. The center is home to the space shuttle Discovery. “Mr. Terefe admitted today to stealing hundreds of thousands of dollars from one of America's most revered institutions,” Neil H. MacBride, U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia, said in a statement dated Friday, when Terefe entered his plea.
NEWS
January 23, 1994 | Associated Press
Historian Spencer Crew has been appointed director of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History. He has been acting director of the museum since December, 1992.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1987
"The Making of Foxfire," a short documentary on the regional lore and tradition that inspired the "Foxfire" play and TV special, was presented to the Smithsonian Institution this week by Hume Cronyn and Jessica Tandy. Funded by Hallmark, the film was produced and directed by Lawrence Gordon Shulman and written by Terri Miller.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2011 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Ira Michael Heyman, a champion of affirmative action who led UC Berkeley as its chancellor during the 1980s and later became the first non-scientist to lead the Smithsonian Institution, has died. He was 81. Heyman died at his Berkeley home Saturday after a long battle with emphysema. The Smithsonian and the university announced his death Monday. During 10 years as UC Berkeley chancellor, Heyman increased minority representation in the student body and on the faculty, efforts that stirred considerable debate and controversy.
NATIONAL
May 6, 2011 | By Julie Mianecki, Washington Bureau
A federal commission has recommended construction of a museum on the National Mall honoring the history of American Latinos. The commission submitted a report to Congress and the White House on Thursday outlining the details of the proposed $600-million National Museum of the American Latino, which has been endorsed by Interior Secretary Ken Salazar. It would be part of the Smithsonian Institution, which already has a museum dedicated to American Indians and is planning another focusing on African Americans.
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