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OPINION
August 11, 2011
Former President Bush had a nasty tendency to put politics ahead of science; one of the more flagrant examples of this occurred in 2008, when the Environmental Protection Agency set a weaker standard on ozone, the key ingredient in smog, than the agency's scientific advisory panel had unanimously recommended. President Obama arrived in office the following year promising to rescue us from such dangerous interference. So what is Obama doing about the smog problem? Apparently, putting politics ahead of science.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
A day after hearing hours of impassioned testimony from a divided trucking industry, California air quality regulators on Friday postponed deadlines for aging heavy-duty trucks to comply with the nation's toughest diesel air pollution rules. The action by the state Air Resources Board will give small fleets, lightly used trucks and those operating in rural areas more time to upgrade to newer, cleaner models or install filters to remove soot from their exhaust. Officials say the changes will slow pollution cuts for several years but still allow the state to reach its goal of cutting diesel emissions 85% by 2020.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1994
Free rapid transit is the only answer to the traffic snarl and the smog. LEROY J. DAVIS Anaheim
WORLD
March 17, 2014 | Kim Willsher, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
PARIS -- With the City of Light buried under a thick blanket of smog for a week now, authorities in the French capital took drastic steps Monday to cut the number of cars on the road and to encourage commuters to find more environmentally friendly ways of getting to work.   Only cars with license plates ending in an odd number were allowed on to Paris streets during the day. Drivers with plates ending in an even number were ordered to leave their vehicles at home and use public transport, which officials have made free of charge since Friday to try to reduce pollution -- at a cost of $5.6 million a day. [Updated  1:40 p.m. PDT, March 17: Late Monday, authorities announced that the driving curbs would be lifted as of midnight because the level of pollution had dropped.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2013 | By Shan Li
If there's a need, a Chinese entrepreneur will find a way. The foul smog swallowing much of China has inspired one such man to launch a humorous campaign to focus on environmental issues -- by selling canned fresh air. Known for his showman flair, millionaire Chen Guangbiao stood on a Beijing sidewalk on Wednesday handing out cans filled with what he said was air procured from remote areas of the country untainted by air pollution, according to...
NEWS
July 23, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
People who live in excessively smoggy areas tend to have higher rates of heart disease, according to several studies. New research shows just how certain components of smog destroy cells in the heart. In research presented Wednesday, scientists exposed rats to ozone — a major component of smog when it forms near the ground from hydrocarbons — for various periods of time. The found that, compared to unexposed rats, the hearts of the rats exposed to ozone had increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, which is a marker for inflammation.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2013 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - When a thick quilt of smog enveloped swaths of China earlier this month, it set in motion a costly chain reaction for the world's No. 2 economy. Authorities canceled flights across northern China and ordered some factories shut. Hospitals were flooded with hacking patients. A fire in an empty furniture factory in eastern Zhejiang province went undetected for hours because the smoke was indistinguishable from the haze. In coastal Shandong province, most highways were closed for fear that low visibility would cause motorists to crash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1986
Thank you for supporting additional research to determine the best way to rid ourselves of the scourge of smog. After living with this smoky menace for decades, it is particularly distressing to realize that our efforts at eradication are based on such minute amounts of data. Organizations such as the Coalition for Clear Air support the findings of the Air Resources Board and will continue to press for greater research into the causes of smog so that we may hasten its permanent departure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1989
Pollution readings from Los Angeles County Monitoring Stations over the past 12 years show that smog alerts have been more frequent in the San Gabriel Valley--where there are monitoring stations in Azusa, Pomona, Pasadena and Glendora--than in other parts of the county.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - The Environmental Protection Agency issued final rules Monday to slash the amount of sulfur in gasoline, which would help cut smog-causing pollution from autos and bring the rest of the country's fuel supply in line with California's standards. The new rule for "Tier 3" gasoline calls for reducing the amount of sulfur in fuel by two-thirds, to 10 parts per million from 30 parts per million. Similar low-sulfur gasoline is already in use in California, Europe, Japan and South Korea.
WORLD
February 25, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - To mask or not to mask -- that is still a question. A huge swath of northeast China -- more than 10% of the country's landmass -- is again engulfed in toxic smog. Beijing's air quality index, as measured by the U.S. Embassy, hit “hazardous” territory for a sixth day running Tuesday. No relief is expected in the capital until at least Thursday. The murky gray haze cut visibility on roads, reduced the sun to a faint, moon-like tangerine orb in the sky and prompted the city to issue an “orange alert” -- one step away from the most serious level, red. About 150 industrial companies have either halted or curbed production to cut down on emissions, Beijing has dispatched tanker trucks to spray roads with water to reduce particulates and the state-run Xinhua news agency is reminding people to avoid outdoor activities and to wear masks.
SCIENCE
February 4, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
As if it weren't bad enough to breathe already, a new study has detected traces of more than 1,300 species of microbes in some of Beijing's most polluted air. Most of the microbes detected by scientists were harmless bacteria that are commonly found in soil. But the study found some bacteria and fungi that are known to cause allergies and respiratory diseases. Some of those pathogens were found in higher proportions in air samples collected on the smoggiest days. Chinese researchers conducted the analysis because they were familiar with the health consequences of air pollution and wanted to know if it contained allergens and pathogens that could be adding to the problem.
WORLD
January 29, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - Flowers to mark the new year? How about electronic gizmos that flash and go bang? Fireworks are as integral to Chinese New Year as evergreens are to Christmas. Tradition holds that noisy pops and colorful flares ward off evil spirits and bring good luck for the coming year. But the pyrotechnics also release particulates that include sulfur dioxide and other toxins. With smog blanketing many Chinese cities as the Year of the Horse approaches, environmental activists, meteorologists and government officials are urging people to start the new year without a bang Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
Air pollution in California has dropped significantly over the last decade, yet about one-third of the population lives in communities where the air does not meet federal health standards, state officials reported Thursday. The evaluation of smog and soot levels was presented at a meeting in Sacramento of the California Air Resources Board, which oversees the state's progress in cleaning air that remains among the dirtiest in the nation. Despite falling 15% to 20% in urban areas since 2003, smog remains above federal health standards in parts of Greater Los Angeles, the San Joaquin Valley, Sacramento and San Diego, the board's report said.
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By L.A. at Home staff
Love L.A.? Rosemary Dardick and Robin Belcher celebrate the city with linocuts of neighborhood sights such as the Highland Theatre in Highland Park, the Helms Bakery in Culver City or the Norms sign in Santa Monica.  HANDMADE HOLIDAYS: More gift picks Working under the name Ink and Smog Editions, the couple draw and cut their designs, then print them using a bottle-jack press they built themselves in their Koreatown living room. (You can see a photo of the contraption on their Kickstarter page , which announces the pending arrival of their 1960s letterpress and industrial paper cutter.)
WORLD
November 28, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim
TEHRAN -- The Iranian capital has long been known for its smog, but pollution in recent days has taken an eye-watering turn for the worse, hampering visibility and causing authorities to shutter schools and curtail the number of cars allowed in the city center. Children and the elderly have been told to stay indoors if possible, and the smog has forced even healthy residents to cut back on strolls and jogs. On Wednesday, only cars with license plates ending in even numbers were permitted on downtown streets.
SCIENCE
August 12, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
You might wonder what ingredient in a Mexican-made hair gel called Moco de Gorila - or Gorilla Snot - got its distributor in trouble with the law. It's probably not what you're thinking. It was the styling product's smog-forming compounds that prompted California air regulators to take action against Midway Importing Inc. The Houston-based company, which distributes health and beauty care products nationwide, paid $213,000 in fines for selling the line of hair gel in violation of consumer product regulations designed to protect air quality, the California Air Resources Board said Monday.
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