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Smog Check Ii

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1996
Complaints that Smog Check II is placing an undue economic burden on owners of older cars are directed at the wrong quarter (letters, Nov. 19). Our city's legacy of disregard for mass transit users, pedestrians and cyclists is the real culprit. With urban planning that has encouraged sprawl while neglecting viable transit options, most citizens are trapped into needing an automobile. Since cars will continue to wear out and pollute, the solution should be a safe, convenient system of transportation options (starting at the neighborhood level with frequent buses and safe bike paths)
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OPINION
March 23, 2002
What would a Redlands resident say if Santa Monica motorists were exempt from the state's stringent Smog Check II test because, with all those ocean breezes, Santa Monica has no smog problem? Right. He would say their exhaust gases just blow inland and become Redlands' smog problem. Well, the folks in the Sacramento and San Joaquin valleys feel the same way about the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1998
California's automobile smog control program has a rich history of controversy. In 1975, the Legislature passed a bill requiring that all older vehicles be retrofitted with a device that would significantly reduce emissions of oxides of nitrogen, major components in smog. The protest against the bill was so intense that then-Gov. Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown Jr. vetoed it. The latest fuss concerns Smog Check II, another attempt to reduce these emissions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1998
Smog Check II, the state program to cut smog in Los Angeles and other cities that have severe pollution problems, has presented policymakers with plenty of tough choices. For example, how much should motorists have to pay to repair cars that fail the tougher new emissions test? Should the state reimburse poor people, who typically own older, more heavily polluting cars, in order to get those clunkers off the road?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1998
Re your Sept. 2 article on Smog Check II: I would like to know whose idea it was to make the auto repair shops rich at the expense of automobile owners in Southern California. First, the politicians fail to ensure any type of affordable or accommodating mass transit, thereby ensuring dependence on automobiles, and now they bury their heads in the sand while the Bureau of Automotive Repairs works hand in hand with the lobbyist for the California Service Station and Automotive Repair Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1997 | BILL BILLITER
The state's new auto-inspection system, Smog Check II, will be the topic for a public hearing at next week's City Council meeting. Former Mayor Richard Polis earlier this year requested the hearing at a council meeting at which he denounced the smog program and urged the council to take a stand against it. Polis and other critics say it is unfair and potentially ruinous for owners of older cars. Supporters of the program say it is needed to ensure healthful air quality.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1998 | Capitol Alert News Service
Some of the state's top business lobbyists are fighting to preserve the controversial Smog Check II program after lawmakers shaping next year's state budget proposed to strip its funding.
NEWS
October 17, 1996 | Associated Press
About 2,000 people rallied Wednesday at the Capitol against a stringent new anti-smog program that forces drivers to fix their clunkers and pollution-belching vehicles. The chanting, clapping crowd--a mix that ranged from mountain militia recruiters to owners of costly classic cars--denounced Smog Check II, a program that the state began phasing in last April. It is scheduled to be fully operational by January.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1997
California lawmakers developed compromise legislation this week that purports to soften the impact of the controversial Smog Check II program on low-income owners of the worst-polluting vehicles on the road. But in fact, the major effect of the legislation may be to delay further the implementation of the Smog Check II program and to invite punitive measures from the federal government for failing to comply with the federal Clean Air Act of 1992.
OPINION
September 29, 1996
A protest rally that drew 3,000 people to the state capitol last month had a decidedly California flavor: It was about cars. Many in the angry crowd, carrying such signs as "First you came for our guns, now you come for our cars!" and "Kiss My Gas," feared that the object of their disaffection, Smog Check II, would give state officials the authority to seize polluting vehicles. They urged lawmakers to suspend the new inspection regime. In fact, seizures are not permitted under the program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1998
Re your Sept. 2 article on Smog Check II: I would like to know whose idea it was to make the auto repair shops rich at the expense of automobile owners in Southern California. First, the politicians fail to ensure any type of affordable or accommodating mass transit, thereby ensuring dependence on automobiles, and now they bury their heads in the sand while the Bureau of Automotive Repairs works hand in hand with the lobbyist for the California Service Station and Automotive Repair Assn.
NEWS
September 2, 1998 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of delays, a tough new Smog Check program expected to significantly increase the number of cars that fail pollution tests will begin next Wednesday, state officials said Tuesday. The program, which had become so controversial that only a last-minute political maneuver saved it from legislative annihilation, will be phased in gradually, officials said. Failure rates in the initial months will increase only modestly, to about 11%, from 9%, they said.
NEWS
August 25, 1998 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California motorists have been paying extra fees for an enhanced smog check program that exists mostly on paper and has yet to do anything to scrub the brown haze from the air. Smog Check II was designed to clean up oxides of nitrogen, the chemical from car emissions that turns smog brown, burns the lungs and obscures the peaks of the San Gabriel Mountains even on some sunny days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1998
The Times' June 26 headline declaring the San Francisco Bay Area "like the rest" of California in air quality missed one important point. That region remains the only metropolitan area in California with a statutory exemption from California's clean air regulations (Smog Check II). It's of concern to the Central Valley because prevailing winds blow the Bay Area's pollution into our area. It should be of concern to all of California because the exemption results in other regions having to pay a higher price in the fight against smog.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1998 | Capitol Alert News Service
Some of the state's top business lobbyists are fighting to preserve the controversial Smog Check II program after lawmakers shaping next year's state budget proposed to strip its funding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1997
Here's good news: The South Coast region had 121 stage one smog alerts 20 years ago and just one so far this year. Meanwhile, the average new car today creates only about 1/10th the pollution of its 1977 counterpart. In spite of millions of additional residents and autos, Southern California's air is the cleanest it has been in decades.
NEWS
September 14, 1996 | From Associated Press
California's controversial Smog Check II program should be suspended until Jan. 1, 1998, to give the Legislature time to draft a better plan, a letter signed by 46 state legislators says. "Information from within the Department of Consumer Affairs and information provided from private sources leads us to believe that Smog Check II has many problems and gaps that need to be addressed," the legislators said in the letter delivered Thursday to the state Bureau of Automotive Repair.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Pierce College was one of 18 community colleges statewide to be given the latest technology in smog-checking systems, and with it the ability to train smog technicians to implement the new, stricter laws going into effect next year. Since early October, the college's automotive program has used Smog Check II computerized equipment to familiarize currently licensed technicians with it so they will be ready when the new regulations become mandatory in March.
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