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Smoke Detector

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NEWS
February 14, 1993
Fire officials, concerned about five fire-related deaths in the city in the last 11 months, last week urged people to install smoke detectors in their homes and to make sure the equipment works. A working smoke detector would have made the difference between life and death, said Capt. Harry Crusberg, lead investigator on the fatal blazes. The most recent blaze occurred Tuesday, when a woman in her 60s was found dead in a 3 a.m. fire in her second-floor bedroom at 215 Sequoia Drive.
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BUSINESS
April 4, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Nest this week halted sales of the Nest Protect, its smart smoke detector, after an issue was found within the product that could cause it to delay ringing an alarm if there were a fire. The company, which was acquired earlier this year by Google for more than $3 billion, also encouraged users who own the device to disable a feature called Nest Wave, which is the source of the problem. The feature allows users to turn off the Nest Protect with a wave of their hand, but under certain circumstances, the feature could cause the device to not function properly.
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REAL ESTATE
September 30, 1990 | From the Associated Press
One of modern technology's more common items, the smoke detector, is being ignored by many owners, often to their peril. Non-working smoke detectors contribute to as many as 6,000 fire-related deaths and 130,000 injuries each year, according to Change Your Clock, Change Your Battery, a cooperative campaign sponsored by the International Assn. of Fire Chiefs, the American Burn Assn. and Eveready Battery Co. They hope that tying in the ritual of time change Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
Authorities on Sunday were investigating the circumstances of a fire that swept through a South Los Angeles home and left one man dead. The blaze erupted in a single-story home in the 300 block of East 106th Street about 10:40 p.m. Saturday, said Cecil Manresa of the Los Angeles Fire Department. The victim's age and identity were not available. Coroner's officials said the body was burned beyond recognition. At least one smoke detector was present in the home, but whether it was functioning is unknown, Manresa said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1989
Prompted by the deaths of two infants in last month's fire in a Huntington Beach day-care home where there was no smoke detector, the Legislature quickly passed and Gov. George Deukmejian has signed into law a bill requiring detectors in all licensed day-care homes, regardless of their size. The new law clears up a senseless inconsistency that required detectors in some day-care facilities and not in others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1996 | THAO HUA
Orange County firefighters are offering senior citizens throughout the county free smoke detectors and free installation. Under a new program funded by a federal grant, the Orange County Fire Authority already has distributed more than 100 smoke detectors to senior citizens, officials announced this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1989 | ALLISON SAMUELS, Times Staff Writer
Huntington Beach officials announced Tuesday that the Rainbow Disposal Co. will donate 500 smoke detectors to be distributed free to day-care centers, senior citizens and lower-income residents in response to a fire that killed two children in a local day-care facility in June. "The tragedy that killed those two children was one that could have been avoided," Huntington Beach Fire Department Chief Raymond C. Picard said at a press conference where the $2,500 donation was announced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1996
To help make the holiday season a safe one for older adults, the Orange County Fire Authority and Orange County Area Agency on Aging are joining to distribute free smoke detectors. Starting Monday, Orange County residents 60 and older are eligible to receive a new smoke detector and battery simply by calling the agency. The devices will be installed for free by members of the county fire authority. Information: (714) 567-7500.
NEWS
November 14, 1996 | Associated Press
Rep. Harold Rogers (R-Ky.) escaped from an early morning house fire Wednesday, a day after he had installed a new smoke alarm that he said helped save his life. The blaze destroyed the back of Rogers' house and left the front heavily damaged by smoke and water. A faulty space heater may have sparked the fire, said Fire Chief Buddy Haney. "I'm physically OK," an emotional Rogers said shortly afterward, his voice trailing off. "I don't have anything . . . all my memories . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2014 | By Jason Felch
An elderly woman who died of smoke inhalation from a fire in her South Los Angeles home early Saturday was described by a family member as a "caring and giving person" who had lived in the home since the 1940s. Anna Brooks, 98, was rescued from her South Park home by firefighters and transported to a hospital, where she was pronounced dead, authorities said. The fire in the 200 block of East 47th Place broke out about 3:40 a.m. and was brought under control by more than 50 firefighters in less than 20 minutes, said Erik Scott, spokesman for the Los Angeles Fire Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2014 | By Ruben Vives and Ari Bloomekatz
A 36-year-old man who died Tuesday after a fire broke out in his Mid-City bedroom is the seventh person to be killed in a home fire so far this year in Los Angeles, officials said, and the latest to occur where no smoke detectors had been installed. The fire Tuesday was first reported at 5:36 a.m. at 2305 South Orange Drive, said Katherine Main of the Los Angeles Fire Department. It took 55 firefighters about 14 minutes to knock it down, she said. Fire officials said the 36-year-old man, whose name has not been released, lived with his mother and aunt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014 | By Ruben Vives and Christine Mai-Duc
A family of four died Monday when a fire ripped through the converted barn where they had been living. Firefighters were called to the scene in the 13700 block of Eldridge Avenue in Sylmar about 4:30 a.m. They kicked down the door of the two-story structure and pulled out the four family members, said Capt. Jaime E. Moore of the Los Angeles Fire Department. The father was found a few feet from the front door, his wife and two young children huddled together nearby. All four were unresponsive, and were pronounced dead after being taken to hospitals.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2013 | By Michael Mello
An 11-year-old girl was the sole survivor of a house fire that killed four other children and an adult early Saturday in the western Georgia city of Newnan, about 30 miles southwest of Atlanta. The girl was awakened by her mother, who said the house was on fire and urged her to run, authorities told the Los Angeles Times. Authorities said the girl's mother, Alonna McCrary, died trying to save the other children, who ranged in age from 1 to 5. The surviving girl was treated at a local hospital for smoke inhalation, the Associated Press reported.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Los Angeles Times
FT. MEADE, Md. -- Top officials at the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, denied Tuesday that hidden microphones or other devices were installed in the courtroom, meeting huts and prison compound to enable government intelligence officials to eavesdrop on confidential sessions between defense lawyers and five detainees in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The witnesses also testified that legal mail for the detainees is not routinely opened and reviewed, except during prison-wide inspections to check for contraband.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2011 | By Martin Eichner
Question: I recently bought a duplex. I need to complete repairs to the property in order to list the two units for rental. A friend recently told me that I have to install a carbon monoxide detector as well as a smoke detector if I rent out one of the units. Are these devices necessary? Answer: The California law regarding the installation of carbon monoxide detectors is being gradually phased in. Carbon monoxide detectors were required in all single-family dwellings as of July.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2007 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
The theme for this year's Fire Prevention Week, which ended Saturday, was "Practice Your Escape Plan." To put a modern twist on it, the National Fire Protection Assn. invited folks to make videos of their escape drills and post them on YouTube for all to see. The video campaign was not a rousing success. By midweek, only two videos were submitted, one of which starred Otis, a family dog. But that doesn't mean the message was a bad one. There were 412,000 home fires in the U.S.
REAL ESTATE
May 7, 2006 | James and Morris Carey, Associated Press
Myths are entertaining as literature. However, when the subject is home maintenance, they can be dangerous and costly. Here are some common misconceptions about home maintenance. Smoke alarms Myth: Pushing the "test" button on a smoke detector is all one needs to do to ensure that it is operating properly. Truth: The test button on a smoke detector will only confirm that the audible alarm is functional. It does nothing to determine whether the detector or smoke sensor is operating properly.
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