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OPINION
January 7, 2011
Cigarette makers do a lot more than shred tobacco and roll it up in thin sheets of paper. A December report by the surgeon general's office outlined a host of changes that tobacco companies have made over the years to render smoking easier to start and harder to quit. For instance, vents and other filter designs make the smoke feel less harsh even though it does the same damage. A bigger, quicker hit of nicotine means faster addiction. Strange to say, though, the government knows very little about these changes or when they took place or precisely what they entailed.
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BUSINESS
December 13, 2012 | David Lazarus
Rita Corwin, 90, conscientiously paid her premiums for long-term care insurance for 21 years to make sure that if she needed help as she grew older and more fragile, she'd get it. Yet now that she finds herself in a position to require such assistance, her insurer, Washington National Insurance Co., is denying her claims. "She bought this insurance for the same reason anyone would," said Corwin's daughter, Leni, who has been representing her mother in their dealings with the company.
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MAGAZINE
November 22, 1992
Almost all of Coleman's articles are about how everybody treats blacks unfairly. Now even Joe Camel is racist. Why this one-sided view continues is beyond me. PAUL MIZE Gardena
OPINION
January 7, 2011
Cigarette makers do a lot more than shred tobacco and roll it up in thin sheets of paper. A December report by the surgeon general's office outlined a host of changes that tobacco companies have made over the years to render smoking easier to start and harder to quit. For instance, vents and other filter designs make the smoke feel less harsh even though it does the same damage. A bigger, quicker hit of nicotine means faster addiction. Strange to say, though, the government knows very little about these changes or when they took place or precisely what they entailed.
OPINION
January 23, 2008
Re "Ghosts," editorial, Jan. 17 Your editorial states that "2007 was the deadliest year yet for U.S. troops in Iraq: 899 lost their lives, surpassing the previous high of 850 in 2004." But then you say the "surge," which "has reduced both the overall violence in Iraq and the number of U.S. casualties, has unnerved critics who last spring were calling for an immediate pullout." Since the surge started in 2007, and 2007 was the deadliest year, it follows that the surge is not working.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1992
Bill Clinton now says that he experimented with marijuana while a student in England more than 20 years ago. That's not the answer he gave when questioned previously as to whether he--like so many Americans of his generation--had ever used pot. In years past, Clinton very carefully responded that he had never broken any state law, or the laws of this country. He qualified other answers by explaining that he had never experimented with drugs "in Arkansas ever since I've been an adult."
NEWS
November 20, 1998 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A high-ranking Kremlin official on Thursday accused the flamboyant president of the southern republic of Kalmykia of trying to deflect questions about his finances by threatening to secede from Russia. Oleg N. Sysuyev, deputy chief of President Boris N. Yeltsin's administration, also announced that new criminal investigations have been opened into allegations that Kirsan N. Ilyumzhinov has illegally mishandled federal funds.
OPINION
September 5, 2008
Re "Defiant Palin comes out swinging," Sept. 4 The acceptance speech I heard Gov. Sarah Palin give did not acknowledge a single problem or offer a single remedy for the millions of Americans who are struggling single parents, dual working parents without child care, laid-off workers, seniors on fixed incomes, families suffering from the mortgage debacle or our overburdened hospital emergency room system. She did nothing but compare herself to a pit bull with lipstick, mock the life stories of her opponents, glorify war and warriors, speak for "the people," refer to her "servant's heart," expose her five children to a media she does not trust and demonstrate her lust for office.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2003
As someone who is asthmatic and smoke sensitive, I want to know how the new "Whoopi" show is going to portray the "realistic" consequences of exposing people to secondhand smoke ("Whoopi Ignites Furor," Aug. 4). Are the producers going to show someone with asthma going to the emergency room after exposure to Whoopi's smoke? Are the producers going to show someone with emphysema on oxygen, sitting in a chair because he or she is too exhausted to walk from being exposed to Whoopi's smoke?
SPORTS
August 1, 2010
From San Francisco Given what the Dodgers accomplished at the deadline, it might've been more interesting had Major League Baseball allowed owners to be traded away, you know, maybe for a person with money to be named. . . . . . . . . . . . NEWS FLASH: It doesn't appear to matter who the Choking Dogs acquired, the season looking as if it ended at 3:40 p.m. Saturday, July 31, Jonathan Broxton gagging and giving up a two-run home run, former Dodgers pitcher Guillermo Mota then adding to the embarrassment and retiring the Dogs for a 2-1 win. That's four losses in five games in the most important 10-game stretch to date for the Dogs, who have responded to such a challenge by rolling over and playing dead.
HEALTH
January 18, 2010 | By Judith Graham
If you're an older adult wondering what you should be doing to stay healthy, the most important answer is staying active. "Physical activity is more powerful than any medication a senior can take," says Dr. Cheryl Phillips, a San Francisco physician and president of the American Geriatrics Society. Much of the frailty that accompanies advanced age can be mitigated through exercise. Even moderate activity makes a difference. Frailty often leads to impairment and the loss of independence -- developments that can be preventable.
OPINION
August 30, 2009
Re "We don't need the pain of torture indictments," Opinion, Aug. 26 My hat is off to Tim Rutten, who has brought brilliant new insight to the administration of justice. With Rutten's approach, we can save literally billions of dollars. No more do we need "an absolutist, narrow reading of the law." From now on, there is no need to prosecute people who clearly and knowingly violated both the law and common decency, because "it would be a travesty" to go after them without also going after those above them.
OPINION
June 3, 2009 | Michael Siegel, Michael Siegel is a professor in the social and behavioral sciences department at Boston University School of Public Health, where he specializes in tobacco policy analysis.
This week, the U.S. Senate is considering legislation that would, for the first time, give the Food and Drug Administration regulatory authority over tobacco products. Numerous anti-smoking and health groups support the legislation. So does this mean Congress is finally on the verge of stepping up to take on Big Tobacco? Hardly.
OPINION
October 27, 2008
Re "Former Fed chief 'shocked' by crisis," Oct. 24 I am no fan of Alan Greenspan and believe that he bears significant responsibility for our current financial meltdown. But where is the focus on those politicians who in the past sat silently in awe of the former Federal Reserve chairman while he used fancy technical language to explain his simple theory that the market, if left completely on its own, would self-regulate and create stability for our economy? Because they were afraid to admit that they didn't understand his theories or discourse, they never asked the simple question, "Excuse me, what the hell are you talking about?"
OPINION
September 5, 2008
Re "Defiant Palin comes out swinging," Sept. 4 The acceptance speech I heard Gov. Sarah Palin give did not acknowledge a single problem or offer a single remedy for the millions of Americans who are struggling single parents, dual working parents without child care, laid-off workers, seniors on fixed incomes, families suffering from the mortgage debacle or our overburdened hospital emergency room system. She did nothing but compare herself to a pit bull with lipstick, mock the life stories of her opponents, glorify war and warriors, speak for "the people," refer to her "servant's heart," expose her five children to a media she does not trust and demonstrate her lust for office.
OPINION
January 23, 2008
Re "Ghosts," editorial, Jan. 17 Your editorial states that "2007 was the deadliest year yet for U.S. troops in Iraq: 899 lost their lives, surpassing the previous high of 850 in 2004." But then you say the "surge," which "has reduced both the overall violence in Iraq and the number of U.S. casualties, has unnerved critics who last spring were calling for an immediate pullout." Since the surge started in 2007, and 2007 was the deadliest year, it follows that the surge is not working.
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