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ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1994
In her article "Blame It on Bizet" (Off-Centerpiece, June 19), Juliann Garey goes to great lengths to explain how movies and television shows continue to encourage young people to smoke by having their role models puff away on screen. The article totally ignores the considerable impact the Entertainment Industries Council Inc. has made through its distribution of "Spotlight on Depiction of Health and Social Issues," a notebook intended to provide clear-cut, accurate information to creators of television and film productions when they deal with such health or social issues as tobacco, alcohol and other drugs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2013 | Steve Lopez
Marijuana policy, like immigration policy, is something the country just can't seem to get right. For the latest evidence of how confusing pot laws can be, just take a look at Anaheim, where a property owner is fighting a federal government attempt to seize his two-story commercial building, which is worth about $1.5 million. Tony Jalali's crime? On two occasions he rented one of his 12 office spaces to medical marijuana dispensaries, thinking such operations were perfectly legal in California.
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WORLD
March 12, 2013 | By Henry Chu
VATICAN CITY - Black smoke rose Tuesday evening from the Sistine Chapel, signaling that the 115 cardinals gathered inside to choose a new pope failed to reach agreement after their opening few hours of deliberation. It was the prelates' first vote on a successor to Benedict XVI, who stepped down as pope late last month in an extraordinarily rare move for the head of the Roman Catholic Church. The ritualized process of choosing his replacement began Tuesday behind the closed doors of the small but famous chapel, which is covered in Michelangelo's glorious frescoes.
WORLD
March 13, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
VATICAN CITY -- Roman Catholic cardinals signaled Wednesday that they had failed to agree on a new pope during the early session of the second day of secret voting inside the Sistine Chapel. Black smoke rose from a stovepipe above the chapel before noon as ballots from the morning's vote were burned because no single candidate had won support from at least two-thirds of the 115 cardinals gathered to choose a successor to Benedict XVI. Thousands of people gathered in St. Peter's Square under a sea of umbrellas and gave a shout as the smoke poured skyward.
WORLD
March 13, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
VATICAN CITY -- Roman Catholic cardinals signaled Wednesday that they had failed to agree on a new pope during the early session of the second day of secret voting inside the Sistine Chapel. Black smoke rose from a stovepipe above the chapel before noon as ballots from the morning's vote were burned because no single candidate had won support from at least two-thirds of the 115 cardinals gathered to choose a successor to Benedict XVI. Thousands of people gathered in St. Peter's Square under a sea of umbrellas and gave a shout as the smoke poured skyward.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1988 | COLMAN ANDREWS
When Carol Herman took her mother out to dinner at the Lotus Pavilion in Arcadia recently, she requested a "no smoking" table. After the soup, Herman writes, she "became aware of smoke coming from two tables away where a woman was actually chain-smoking." Later, a man sitting at the very next table "pushed away his sliced orange (which this restaurant serves as dessert) and lit up."
SPORTS
September 10, 1985 | GARY POMERANTZ, The Washington Post
The smoke signals have been sent out that the Dallas Cowboys are in decline. Some observers see a divisive quarterback controversy, a running back in financial turmoil and a frightening lack of team depth and figure the Cowboys' 9-7 non-playoff mark in 1984 may shrink even more. "Maybe it is that way. But to predict that is asinine," figures Everson Walls, the Cowboys' all-pro cornerback. "That's just the critics trying to make a name for themselves."
MAGAZINE
December 5, 2004
The U.S. Supreme Court case Ashcroft vs. Raich is an important one in the effort to help America's young people understand that smoked marijuana is not medicine ("The Plaintiff," by Carol Mithers, Nov. 14). Although the drug legalizers have successfully convinced a vast number of Americans that marijuana is good, parents and grandparents who have watched their children fall prey to this myth will tell you otherwise. There are currently 182,000 young people in treatment for marijuana-related problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2007 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Some towns were named for nearby historic missions. One stemmed from the fact that its site had been used for smoke signals. Still others were based on simple geography. Los Angeles County has 88 cities, each with its own story. Here's how some of them got their names, along with the year they incorporated. San Dimas (1960) The area known as Mud Springs served as a watering spot for animals when explorer Jedediah Strong Smith passed through in 1826.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1992 | DEBORAH STARR SEIBEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There may never be another Holly Golightly again. Impossibly beautiful and outrageously chic, "Breakfast at Tiffany's" Audrey Hepburn regularly dazzled on-screen neighbor George Peppard with her unlikely, cocktails-at-8 get-ups: elegant black sheaths, mysterious wide-brimmed hats and--in what was, perhaps, her best defense against anyone trying to get too close--a cigarette holder long enough to light a fire in the next room.
WORLD
March 12, 2013 | By Henry Chu
VATICAN CITY - Black smoke rose Tuesday evening from the Sistine Chapel, signaling that the 115 cardinals gathered inside to choose a new pope failed to reach agreement after their opening few hours of deliberation. It was the prelates' first vote on a successor to Benedict XVI, who stepped down as pope late last month in an extraordinarily rare move for the head of the Roman Catholic Church. The ritualized process of choosing his replacement began Tuesday behind the closed doors of the small but famous chapel, which is covered in Michelangelo's glorious frescoes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
A grieving man takes refuge in a dilapidated heap of a sailboat in "Hide Away," slowly restoring its seaworthiness while regaining his equilibrium. The broken-down vessel is an apt metaphor, but sometimes a metaphor is only seafoam-deep. This quiet, atmospheric drama (originally titled "A Year in Mooring") feels padded even in its brief running time; it's a slight mood piece posing as a character study. Josh Lucas is the unnamed protagonist, a businessman who takes possession of the battered boat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2008 | STEVE HARVEY
The Golden Globes have been reduced to a press conference by the writers strike, and other movie awards shows are threatened, including the Oscars. But don't worry about one Hollywood institution: The 28th annual Razzies, dishonoring the worst work in the movies, will go on as scheduled Feb. 23 at the Abracadabra Theater in Santa Monica. The Razzies, unlike the other productions, isn't worried about stars boycotting in support of the strikers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2007 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Some towns were named for nearby historic missions. One stemmed from the fact that its site had been used for smoke signals. Still others were based on simple geography. Los Angeles County has 88 cities, each with its own story. Here's how some of them got their names, along with the year they incorporated. San Dimas (1960) The area known as Mud Springs served as a watering spot for animals when explorer Jedediah Strong Smith passed through in 1826.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2005 | Steve Harvey
Actor Eugene Greytak of Santa Ana has suffered something of a career setback. Greytak has worked for years as an impersonator of Pope John Paul II (see photo), appearing in such movies as "Naked Gun 33 1/3 : The Final Insult." Since John Paul II's death, Greytak told reporters, "friends have been calling me from all over the world. It has been very sad for everyone, but especially for me." In case you're wondering, Hollywood has not yet named an impersonator for Pope Benedict XVI.
MAGAZINE
December 5, 2004
The U.S. Supreme Court case Ashcroft vs. Raich is an important one in the effort to help America's young people understand that smoked marijuana is not medicine ("The Plaintiff," by Carol Mithers, Nov. 14). Although the drug legalizers have successfully convinced a vast number of Americans that marijuana is good, parents and grandparents who have watched their children fall prey to this myth will tell you otherwise. There are currently 182,000 young people in treatment for marijuana-related problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2004 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
Raymond Andrews picks through the foliage of wild tobacco plants on an arid, wind-swept Sierra Nevada plateau. The 55-year-old Paiute Indian, with waist-length gray hair and a leather satchel slung over his shoulder, inspects the leaves with an expert eye. Some, he prunes and discards. Others, he saves to smoke in sacred pipes or distribute as gifts of honor.
HOME & GARDEN
July 3, 2003 | Chris Erskine
Here WE ARE, heading back to our favorite butcher shop. To Porterville, Calif., we go. The city that never sleeps. "He was married to one of those women with no lips," says my buddy Irv, "so her lipstick always looked crooked." Irv is weaving stories as we zigzag our way to Porterville, a couple of hours and 50 tall tales from Los Angeles. It's like being on the road with a 45-year-old Tom Sawyer. The speedometer reaches 70. Irv's mouth tops 85.
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