Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSmokehouse
IN THE NEWS

Smokehouse

FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
July 23, 2000
Recently I spent a few days in Northumberland and heartily endorse everything Nancy J. Baird wrote about this part of northeastern England ("Rambles in Castle Country," July 16). I strongly recommend Northumberland to anyone who likes to get away from the more usual tourist areas. However, I am sorry that Baird did not mention one gastronomic delight prepared in the seaside village of Craster: kippers. The odor emanating from the smokehouse will long remain in my memory, as will my enjoyment of the pair of buttered kippers that I had for breakfast the next morning.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 16, 2013 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
Think of the castle depicted in “Downton Abbey” and your mind immediately springs to … barbecue? Yes, if you're a barbecue aficionado, but only for a little longer. Ever since “ Downton Abbey ” began seducing U.S. viewers with its mix of the travails of British aristocracy and the troubles of the working class, Highclere Castle , in the lush green hills of Berkshire county, has been a draw. The series is shot partly in the 200-room castle and has proved such a tourist draw that it's practically impossible to get tickets to tour the house.
Advertisement
FOOD
July 2, 2008
And there's always a country ham PINK, smoky, deeply flavorful ham -- a few slices sandwiched in a biscuit make for summer-in-the-sun picnic deliciousness. Of course, we're talking ham of the dry-cured country variety -- cured, dried, aged, then smoked (not soaked in brine). It's salty, pungent stuff, best enjoyed when sliced thinly (say, three-sixteenths-inch to one-fourth-inch thick). A whole country ham traditionally comes uncooked, wrapped in a muslin sack and looking like something from an archaeological dig (it's covered in surface mold that has to be removed)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
Some actors like to tout their methods. Others boast of roles they've pulled off. Channing Tatum prefers a little more candor. "I'm never going to be the best actor," Tatum said over lunch last week at the Smokehouse restaurant in Burbank. "I'm just not. But I will work harder than anyone out there. " He's living up to that pledge. In the last year, the 30-year-old former fashion model has appeared on the big screen as a lovelorn soldier ("Dear John"), a maniacal but oddly sensitive Casanova with a happy-face tattoo in a private place ("The Dilemma")
NEWS
May 20, 1991 | United Press International
A mentally handicapped man kept locked in his parents' cellar for 33 years has been discovered and freed, officials said. Rudolf Sulzberger, 39, had been kept in a small smokehouse chamber furnished with a wooden bed, a chair and a bucket for a toilet, officials said. No one in Berg Attergau, a village of 12 houses, could recall seeing him since he was 6. Dr.
NEWS
October 16, 2013 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
Think of the castle depicted in “Downton Abbey” and your mind immediately springs to … barbecue? Yes, if you're a barbecue aficionado, but only for a little longer. Ever since “ Downton Abbey ” began seducing U.S. viewers with its mix of the travails of British aristocracy and the troubles of the working class, Highclere Castle , in the lush green hills of Berkshire county, has been a draw. The series is shot partly in the 200-room castle and has proved such a tourist draw that it's practically impossible to get tickets to tour the house.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
Some actors like to tout their methods. Others boast of roles they've pulled off. Channing Tatum prefers a little more candor. "I'm never going to be the best actor," Tatum said over lunch last week at the Smokehouse restaurant in Burbank. "I'm just not. But I will work harder than anyone out there. " He's living up to that pledge. In the last year, the 30-year-old former fashion model has appeared on the big screen as a lovelorn soldier ("Dear John"), a maniacal but oddly sensitive Casanova with a happy-face tattoo in a private place ("The Dilemma")
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | JIM WASHBURN, Jim Washburn is a free-lance writer who contributes regularly to The Times Orange County Edition
I suppose we all know a few people who are just plain good. Whatever the right thing is in any given situation, they just do it automatically, like it's the only thing to do. You find out they've been doing charity work for years without saying a word about it; supporting their parents; feeding strays; learning CPR; helping kids with their graffiti spelling. Most folks other than my girlfriend--who knows me too well--think I'm a pretty nice guy.
FOOD
March 25, 2009 | Miles Clements
Every order at Scottie's Smokehouse in Orange passes through owner Darren Scott's hands, whether it's a blackened slab of brisket awaiting a deft swipe of the knife or a golden-skinned chicken about to be pulled apart. It's an exacting process, but that control is crucial because Scott has barbecue in his blood.
NEWS
November 21, 2008
Thanksgiving takeout: An article in Wednesday's Food section about restaurants that will be preparing Thanksgiving dinners said that Spring Street Smokehouse is offering deep-fried turkeys this year. It is serving only smoked turkeys.
FOOD
March 25, 2009 | Miles Clements
Every order at Scottie's Smokehouse in Orange passes through owner Darren Scott's hands, whether it's a blackened slab of brisket awaiting a deft swipe of the knife or a golden-skinned chicken about to be pulled apart. It's an exacting process, but that control is crucial because Scott has barbecue in his blood.
FOOD
July 2, 2008
And there's always a country ham PINK, smoky, deeply flavorful ham -- a few slices sandwiched in a biscuit make for summer-in-the-sun picnic deliciousness. Of course, we're talking ham of the dry-cured country variety -- cured, dried, aged, then smoked (not soaked in brine). It's salty, pungent stuff, best enjoyed when sliced thinly (say, three-sixteenths-inch to one-fourth-inch thick). A whole country ham traditionally comes uncooked, wrapped in a muslin sack and looking like something from an archaeological dig (it's covered in surface mold that has to be removed)
TRAVEL
July 23, 2000
Recently I spent a few days in Northumberland and heartily endorse everything Nancy J. Baird wrote about this part of northeastern England ("Rambles in Castle Country," July 16). I strongly recommend Northumberland to anyone who likes to get away from the more usual tourist areas. However, I am sorry that Baird did not mention one gastronomic delight prepared in the seaside village of Craster: kippers. The odor emanating from the smokehouse will long remain in my memory, as will my enjoyment of the pair of buttered kippers that I had for breakfast the next morning.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | JIM WASHBURN, Jim Washburn is a free-lance writer who contributes regularly to The Times Orange County Edition
I suppose we all know a few people who are just plain good. Whatever the right thing is in any given situation, they just do it automatically, like it's the only thing to do. You find out they've been doing charity work for years without saying a word about it; supporting their parents; feeding strays; learning CPR; helping kids with their graffiti spelling. Most folks other than my girlfriend--who knows me too well--think I'm a pretty nice guy.
NEWS
May 20, 1991 | United Press International
A mentally handicapped man kept locked in his parents' cellar for 33 years has been discovered and freed, officials said. Rudolf Sulzberger, 39, had been kept in a small smokehouse chamber furnished with a wooden bed, a chair and a bucket for a toilet, officials said. No one in Berg Attergau, a village of 12 houses, could recall seeing him since he was 6. Dr.
NATIONAL
October 6, 2004 | From Associated Press
A portable house used to teach children how to escape from a burning home clipped a power line while it was being towed Tuesday, causing a nearby house to catch fire. No people were hurt, but a dog died in the blaze. The unlikely series of events started while the Fire Department towed the Arkansas Children's Hospital "smokehouse" to an elementary school. Firefighters had taken the route before.
NEWS
September 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
An eerie glow from salmon drying in a smokehouse startled some residents of Holy Cross, a Yupik Eskimo village of about 300 on the lower Yukon River in Alaska. Sandra Dementieff found that some of the salmon in her smokehouse were glowing in the dark, something she had never seen before, a newspaper reported. Officials determined that the glow was from phosphorescent bacteria.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|