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Smokeless Tobacco

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NEWS
January 16, 1986 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
A federal advisory panel, entering the debate over the dangers of "smokeless" tobacco, Wednesday called the use of snuff and chewing tobacco "health-endangering behavior" with "the clear potential for long-term and serious consequences." "This is not a safe alternative to cigarette smoking," said Dr. Brian MacMahon of the Harvard University School of Public Health, who served as chairman of the committee.
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SCIENCE
November 15, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Cigarette use among middle school and high school students is on the decline, but public health experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are concerned about other ways that tobacco and nicotine  use is rising among kids. Electronic cigarettes, hookahs and dissolvable tobacco were all more popular in 2012 than in 2011, according to data CDC researchers published this week in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Cigar smoking has also become more prevalent among high school students.
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NEWS
March 29, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Major League Baseball begins the 2011 season in two days,  and if public heath officials have their way it will be the last season during which players will be able to chew and spit smokeless tobacco on the field. The leaders of 15 public health departments in cities with professional baseball teams sent a letter Monday to MLB Commissioner Bud Selig and Michael Weiner, executive director of the union representing major league players, urging them to forbid the use of smokeless tobacco products.
SCIENCE
May 14, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
After years of decline , the rate of smokeless tobacco use among young people has leveled off, new research shows. In 2011, 5.2% of middle school and high school students in the U.S. reported using snuff, chewing tobacco or dipping tobacco at least once in the 30 days before they were interviewed for the National Youth Tobacco Survey , which is conducted by the Centers for Disease Patrol and Prevention. That's essentially the same as the 5.3% of young people who were considered smokeless tobacco users in 2000.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2001 | Reuters
Makers and sellers of smokeless tobacco products have agreed to settle a California lawsuit by posting new health warnings and paying $2.75 million for anti-tobacco education, officials said. The settlement, approved by a San Diego superior court judge Monday, requires U.S. Tobacco Co. and eight other smokeless tobacco manufacturers to comply with a 1986 California law requiring consumer warnings for products known to cause cancer or birth defects. The suit targeted producers such as U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1986 | Associated Press
Use of smokeless tobacco is increasing rapidly by teen-agers and even younger children, and young users are generally unaware of the health risks, the government said in a report Friday. The Department of Health and Human Services report said the young users report difficulty in trying to quit, and 4 in 10 users report having sores, ulcers, blisters or other changes in their mouths because of the tobacco.
NEWS
October 25, 1986 | Associated Press
The Federal Trade Commission issued regulations Friday requiring specific health warnings on packages of snuff and chewing tobacco, starting early next year. The warnings, similar to those required on cigarette packages, were developed in response to congressional action this year. The rules cover all smokeless tobacco, a product that has drawn criticism in recent years. Popular with many athletes, chewing tobacco and snuff have been used increasingly by young people in the last few years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1994 | ALICIA DI RADO
About 100 high school students who chew tobacco learned about the dangers of the habit at a conference on Tuesday when they saw graphic photographs of cancer and gum disease caused by smokeless tobacco use. Coaches and advisers pulled many of the students out of class to attend the conference, called "Spittin' in the Wind: The Dangers of Smokeless Tobacco." Former California Angels first baseman Rod Carew and Angels pitcher Mike Butcher told students about how they became addicted to tobacco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Sales of chewing tobacco and other such smokeless products rose sharply in California over the last decade, and officials are especially concerned about the increase in use among youths, state public health officials said Thursday. Smokeless tobacco use among high school students grew to 3.9% of students in 2010, up from 3.1% in 2004. Nearly $211 million in non-cigarette tobacco and nicotine products were sold in California in 2011, up from $77 million in 2001, according to a report released Thursday by the state Department of Public Health.
NEWS
January 22, 1985 | United Press International
The Federal Trade Commission today asked Surgeon General C. Everett Koop to conduct "a comprehensive review" of smokeless tobacco that could lead to health warnings similar to those for cigarettes. There was no immediate response from Koop, who last month wrote to the FTC, "Smokeless tobacco, including snuff, does indeed pose a cancer threat and is associated as well with certain other pathologic oral conditions."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Sales of chewing tobacco and other such smokeless products rose sharply in California over the last decade, and officials are especially concerned about the increase in use among youths, state public health officials said Thursday. Smokeless tobacco use among high school students grew to 3.9% of students in 2010, up from 3.1% in 2004. Nearly $211 million in non-cigarette tobacco and nicotine products were sold in California in 2011, up from $77 million in 2001, according to a report released Thursday by the state Department of Public Health.
SPORTS
October 11, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Texas Rangers President Nolan Ryan criticized Rangers outfielder Josh Hamilton for giving up chewing tobacco during the season instead of waiting for the off-season. "His timing on quitting smokeless tobacco couldn't have been worse," Ryan told Dallas radio program "Galloway and Company. " "You would've liked to have thought that if he was going to do that that he would've done it in the off-season or waited until this off-season to do it. So the drastic effect that it had on him and the year that he was having up to that point in time that he did quit, you'd have liked that he would've taken a different approach to that.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Nearly 30% of middle and high school boys and nearly 18% of girls used some form of tobacco last year, the federal government said in a report published Thursday. Over the last decade, there has been a slow decline in tobacco use among middle and high school students, the report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. But when compared with other long-term studies, such as the Youth Risk Behavior Survey, the steep rate of decline from 1997 to 2003 has slowed noticeably.  Tobacco use remains the leading cause of preventable death and disease in the United States.  “An overall decline in tobacco use is good news, but although four out of five teens don't smoke, far too many kids start to smoke every day,” Thomas R. Frieden, director of the CDC, said in a statement.
HEALTH
July 21, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Tobacco company rep David Howard waxes enthusiastic when he talks about a new product his employer, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., has developed: a pellet of finely cured tobacco, binders and flavoring that dissolves in the mouth in 10 minutes. Under test market in two U.S. cities — Denver and Charlotte, N.C. — Camel Orbs will join two dissolvable tobacco lozenges already on the market if it graduates to broader distribution. And Howard is optimistic it will. "These products provide smokers with an option to enjoy the pleasure of nicotine without bothering others," Howard said.
NEWS
March 29, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Major League Baseball begins the 2011 season in two days,  and if public heath officials have their way it will be the last season during which players will be able to chew and spit smokeless tobacco on the field. The leaders of 15 public health departments in cities with professional baseball teams sent a letter Monday to MLB Commissioner Bud Selig and Michael Weiner, executive director of the union representing major league players, urging them to forbid the use of smokeless tobacco products.
NEWS
March 25, 2011 | By Andrew Zajac, Washington Bureau
It's not often a tobacco company gets released from government regulation without asking. But that's apparently what happened to Star Scientific Inc. after it asked the Food and Drug Administration to treat two versions of its smokeless, dissolvable tobacco lozenges as "modified risk" because they contain lower levels of carcinogens than other tobacco products. The FDA responded that the products aren't considered smokeless tobacco at all and don't come under the 2009 tobacco law, according to a Star Scientific announcement on Wednesday.
NEWS
February 28, 1986 | Associated Press
President Reagan signed into law Thursday a bill requiring health warnings on snuff and chewing tobacco packages and banning radio and television advertising of the products. The measure is aimed at curbing the growing popularity of smokeless tobacco among children and teen-agers.
SPORTS
April 20, 1986 | DAVID MORGAN
Brace yourself for another warning about tobacco. More than 20 years after the report that cigarette smoking is a potential health hazard, the surgeon general has concluded that the use of smokeless tobacco poses similar risks. For the first time, it has been documented that oral cancer, oral leukemia, gum disease, tooth loss and nicotine addiction can be achieved without lighting up. All it takes is a little pinch between the cheek and gums.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2010 | By Andrew Leckey
Question: I'm concerned about my shares of Altria Group Inc. What is the latest outlook? Answer: It is no secret that the U.S. cigarette industry is in a long-term decline because of the health risks of smoking. Its sales could be hurt by a Food and Drug Administration mandate for more-graphic health warnings on cigarette packs that takes effect in October 2012. Potential litigation and increased taxation could cut into earnings. But Altria, which last year earned $3.2 billion on revenue of $23.6 billion, remains a powerful firm that appeals to many investors because of its commanding industry position and regular dividend as well as the unlikelihood that any new tobacco rivals will emerge.
SPORTS
April 14, 2010
Jimmy Rollins, the Philadelphia Phillies' three-time All-Star shortstop, went on the 15-day disabled list because of a strained right calf. "It's unfortunate," Rollins said before Wednesday night's game against the Washington Nationals. "From Monday to today, it's much better. I thought it was torn." Rollins, the 2007 NL MVP, was injured during warmups before Monday's game against the Nationals. The 31-year-old leadoff hitter was off to a hot start, hitting .
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