Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSmokey Robinson
IN THE NEWS

Smokey Robinson

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012
MUSIC Listen to the soul-sweet notes of Smokey Robinson, one of Motown's all-time greats, as he performs with the L.A. Phil at the Hollywood Bowl. You're sure to hear sentimental renditions of timeless hits, including "Tears of A Clown," "I Second That Emotion," and "Tracks of My Tears. " The Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave., L.A. 8 p.m. Sat. Ticket prices vary. http://www.hollywoodbowl.com.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
Smokey Robinson is getting in on the duets album action. Following his appearance Wednesday night on "American Idol," the R&B legend announced Thursday that he's to release a set of all-star duets this fall through the Verve Music Group. The album will join a rash of such collections, including recent efforts from Tony Bennett, Reba McEntire and Lionel Richie. Paul Anka has one due out next month, while John Fogerty will unveil his in May. But wait! "Unlike any other duet-themed project produced to date," a statement insists, "this unique album will include all hits written by Robinson," and that certainly seems true enough: Pop & Hiss can't recall another duets record filled only with Robinson's songs.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
Smokey Robinson is getting in on the duets album action. Following his appearance Wednesday night on "American Idol," the R&B legend announced Thursday that he's to release a set of all-star duets this fall through the Verve Music Group. The album will join a rash of such collections, including recent efforts from Tony Bennett, Reba McEntire and Lionel Richie. Paul Anka has one due out next month, while John Fogerty will unveil his in May. But wait! "Unlike any other duet-themed project produced to date," a statement insists, "this unique album will include all hits written by Robinson," and that certainly seems true enough: Pop & Hiss can't recall another duets record filled only with Robinson's songs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2013
Bobby Rogers, an original member of the Motown group the Miracles, who collaborated with lead vocalist and songwriter Smokey Robinson and kept the musical franchise going after its biggest name left, died Sunday at his suburban Detroit home. He was 73. His death was confirmed by Motown Museum board member Allen Rawls. The cause of death was not disclosed, but Rogers had been in poor health for several years. The group known for such hits as "Shop Around," "You've Really Got a Hold on Me" and "The Tracks of My Tears" was formed in 1956 by Rogers, Robinson, Claudette Rogers, Pete Moore and Ronnie White.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
This post has been updated. See note below for details. Bob Dylan famously called Smokey Robinson “America's greatest living poet” for the exquisite beauty, pain and affection in lyrics to “Tracks of My Tears,” “Tears of a Clown” and so many other songs Robinson wrote and sang during his heyday at Motown in the 1960s and 1970s. Now, Robinson's ready to share a side of his poetry largely separated from music in “Words,” a spoken-word program built around several long-form poems that Robinson will present in a pair of shows this weekend in North Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2012 | By Mikael Wood, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Smokey Robinson refers to himself on his Twitter feed as "Singer, Poet, Philanthropist. " But when Pop & Hiss reached the soul-music legend Monday morning shortly before a rehearsal for his two-night stand this weekend at the Hollywood Bowl, we also found him to be sentimental, worldly and a prodigious user of first names. Forty years ago today, you played your final show with the Miracles in Washington, D.C. Does that seem like another lifetime to you now? It does and it doesn't, Mikael.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1993 | DEBRA CANO
Because donations are down, financial times are tough for the Boys & Girls Club of Buena Park. But the club is banking on singer Smokey Robinson, an alumnus of the Chicago Boys Club, to raise much-needed money during a benefit concert this week. Robinson will perform Saturday at Knott's Berry Farm Good Time Theatre, and the Buena Park group hopes to raise $30,000. "This is the first time we've done a benefit concert," said Jean Morgan, club executive director.
NEWS
February 14, 1989 | From Times wire services
Singer-songwriter Smokey Robinson said today that he became addicted to cocaine after the 1985 breakup of his marriage and the death of his father, but is now drug-free and will release an autobiography and an album this year. "At the time I didn't know I was escaping the pain of leaving home after 27 years," the singer said in an interview. "I didn't know I was escaping the death of my dad. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2000 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"We're going to take a real trip back in time," Smokey Robinson declared at the Wiltern Theatre on Monday. But nostalgia was only part of the singer's agenda. At his best, Robinson made music with enough grace and passion to transcend any era. Some songs were merely sweet, a likable echo of ancient pop.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1992 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not every day's a wonderful day in Mr. Robinson's neighborhood. At least not in singer Smokey Robinson's neighborhood in Encino, if you believe some of his unhappy neighbors. Michael and Barrie Grobstein, who live next door to the Motown legend, claim in a Superior Court lawsuit that Robinson has been causing them mental anguish by such actions as playing music loudly and erecting a "spite" hedge more than 10 feet tall.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
This post has been updated. See note below for details. Bob Dylan famously called Smokey Robinson “America's greatest living poet” for the exquisite beauty, pain and affection in lyrics to “Tracks of My Tears,” “Tears of a Clown” and so many other songs Robinson wrote and sang during his heyday at Motown in the 1960s and 1970s. Now, Robinson's ready to share a side of his poetry largely separated from music in “Words,” a spoken-word program built around several long-form poems that Robinson will present in a pair of shows this weekend in North Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012
MUSIC Listen to the soul-sweet notes of Smokey Robinson, one of Motown's all-time greats, as he performs with the L.A. Phil at the Hollywood Bowl. You're sure to hear sentimental renditions of timeless hits, including "Tears of A Clown," "I Second That Emotion," and "Tracks of My Tears. " The Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave., L.A. 8 p.m. Sat. Ticket prices vary. http://www.hollywoodbowl.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2012 | By Mikael Wood, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Smokey Robinson refers to himself on his Twitter feed as "Singer, Poet, Philanthropist. " But when Pop & Hiss reached the soul-music legend Monday morning shortly before a rehearsal for his two-night stand this weekend at the Hollywood Bowl, we also found him to be sentimental, worldly and a prodigious user of first names. Forty years ago today, you played your final show with the Miracles in Washington, D.C. Does that seem like another lifetime to you now? It does and it doesn't, Mikael.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
When Berry Gordy Jr. wanted to borrow $800 from his family to found Motown Records in 1959, he knew that the most formidable resistance would come from his oldest sister, Esther. "You're 29 years old and what have you done with your life?" his sister snapped as the pair squabbled over his request, her brother later recalled. Edwards assented, but only after Gordy signed a contract pledging future royalties as security. As Motown and its Detroit headquarters turned into a pop-soul powerhouse, Esther Gordy Edwards served as a company executive who guided a young Stevie Wonder and managed the careers of such era-defining artists as Smokey Robinson, Marvin Gaye and the Supremes.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2010
Forty-five years after Smokey Robinson found himself "Going to a Go-Go," he is now headed into Cracker Barrel restaurants ? a sign of change not just in music but for the roadside diners too. The former lead singer of Motown sensations the Miracles on Monday released his latest album not through record outlets, but via a program offered by the chain of nearly 600 diners known for home-style cooking and selling folksy merchandise. The album, called "Smokey Robinson Now & Then," mixes live performances of six classic Miracles' hits such as "Going to a Go-Go," "The Tears of a Clown" and "The Tracks of My Tears," with six studio-recorded tunes from Robinson's recent CD, "Time Flies When You Are Having Fun. " ?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2007 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
UNLIKE so many cineplex offerings these days, the big-screen adaptation of "Dreamgirls" does not open with the tagline "inspired by a true story" -- even if the movie and the smash Broadway musical that preceded it have done little to conceal their real-life inspiration: Motown Records supremo Berry Gordy and his management of Diana Ross and the Supremes in the '60s and '70s.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1987 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
Smokey Robinson, the man who wrote such classics as "Tears of a Clown," recently entered his fourth decade of crooning silky little love songs, still earning, as he has almost from the beginning, accolades from all kinds of folks. In fact, one way to measure Robinson's reputation as a songwriter--both as leader of the Miracles and as a solo artist--is to examine the kind of praise heaped on him by other songwriters, not exactly the most magnanimous segment of the population.
NEWS
October 1, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition.
Smokey Robinson's chief ambition during his boyhood in Detroit was to be a professional baseball player. As it turned out, he became one of the pivotal players in launching a hometown franchise--Motown Records--that was nearly as prolific as the beloved Tigers when it came to knocking out hits. With Motown, Robinson earned a Triple Crown that few pop figures ever attain, writing, singing and producing numerous songs that became instant standards.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2003 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Cantus is a splendid, relatively new male a cappella choral group that swells the ranks of our current golden age of ensemble singing in a distinctive way. Other groups aim for a honeyed but disembodied sound. Cantus matches that blend, but it also revels in a heft of sound hardly imagined possible from 10 men singing without accompaniment. At times, in its Los Angeles debut Saturday in UCLA's Schoenberg Hall, Cantus sounded 50 voices strong.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2001 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's no need to shop around--the legendary Smokey Robinson's Saturday night gig at the Civic Arts Plaza in Thousand Oaks is the happening musical event this weekend. Robinson has pretty much defined the love song during his 40-plus-year career, with 36 Top 40 hits along the way. Robinson has earned a Grammy Living Legend Award, plus he's a member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Songwriters Hall of Fame.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|