Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSmoking Law
IN THE NEWS

Smoking Law

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1987
The Times article (May 6) "Where There's Smoke," not only informs readers about Rancho Mirage's proposed no-smoking law, it also tells us a great deal about RJR Nabisco, Inc. Nabisco, the parent company to R.J. Reynolds Tobacco, sponsors the Dinah Shore Golf Tournament, threatened to move the event to La Quinta if the proposed Rancho Mirage ordinance is voted in by the City Council. Obviously, Nabisco concludes it has the right to bully, intimidate and subvert governmental processes in order to perpetuate its self-interests, whether perceived or real.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Thirty of the 50 largest U.S. cities prohibit smoking indoors at all workplaces, restaurants and bars, the federal government reported. Just 12 years ago, only San Jose had such a law. As of Oct. 12, 16 of the largest cities had comprehensive smoke-free laws, and 14 additional cities were covered under state laws, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported this week. Overall, nearly half of Americans are covered by state or local smoke-free laws, compared with less than 3% in 2000, the CDC said in its report published in the agency's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2000 | JUDY SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
State legislation prohibiting smoking in workplaces might not apply to a Stanton nonprofit group's bingo games, concludes a city attorney's report issued last week. Whether a nonprofit group called the Kingsmen can legally permit smoking at its bingo games will depend on whether the operation employs independent contractors instead of paid employees, said Stanton City Atty. Gregory Diaz. State legislation bans smoking wherever there are paid employees, including bars and gambling operations.
SCIENCE
October 16, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
Bans on smoking in public places and workplaces can sharply reduce heart attacks among both smokers and nonsmokers, according to a report issued Thursday by the Institute of Medicine. The report provides strong support for anti-smoking laws now in place in 21 states and the District of Columbia and is likely to bolster efforts to pass such laws elsewhere. "It's clear that smoking bans work," said Dr. Lynn R. Goldman of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, who chaired the panel that produced the report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1989
The Los Angeles City Council has closed a minor loophole in the city's anti-smoking ordinance, adding indoor rooms where public meetings are held to the list of areas where smoking is not allowed. Without comment, the council adopted and sent to Mayor Tom Bradley a draft ordinance advocated by the Public Health, Human Resources and Senior Citizens Committee that would close a gap in the current anti-smoking ordinance. After much deliberation, the committee on Feb. 24 instructed the city attorney to draft the ordinance prohibiting smoking in any room, chamber, indoor place or indoor public assembly area where public business is conducted, regardless of ownership of the building.
NEWS
November 15, 1990
The city's smoking ordinance will not be expanded, the City Council decided Tuesday. Duarte now prohibits smoking in elevators, public meeting rooms, theaters, auditoriums and public restrooms. Restaurants that seat 50 or more customers must designate at least half of their seats for nonsmoking patrons.
NEWS
November 6, 1986
The Human Services and Park Commission will hold a public hearing Nov. 18 in City Hall on a proposal to limit smoking in the workplace, in restaurants and other locations. The hearing will be at 7:30 p.m. in the City Council chambers. The proposed law, suggested by the Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights, would amend Culver City's anti-smoking law by prohibiting smoking in most public and private buildings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1993 | JEFF McDONALD
The Ojai City Council tonight will consider a variety of approaches to toughen its smoking ordinance, including a possible smoking ban on city sidewalks, in Libbey Park and all other public places except bars and tobacco shops. If the council were to adopt such tough measures, Ojai would have the strictest no-smoking law in the county, City Manager Andrew Belknap said. "We've drafted an ordinance based on the (one adopted by) Moorpark and taken it one step further," Belknap said.
NEWS
December 31, 1987
Three major airlines and Amtrak said they will not comply with a new California law that bans smoking in public transportation effective Jan. 1. American, PSA and United reiterated their opposition after Delta announced that it would obey the law. A federal law banning smoking on flights shorter than two hours takes effect April 22. The major airlines said they will impose the federal smoking restriction on that date but that the state law is preempted by federal law in the meantime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1995 | ALAN EYERLY
Complaints about local violations of a new anti-smoking law will be handled by the county Health Care Agency under an agreement approved Monday by the City Council. The agreement was crafted in response to Assembly Bill 13, known as California's Law for a Smoke-Free Workplace. The legislation, which took effect Jan. 1, prohibits smoking in most enclosed places of employment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2004 | Bob Pool and Karima A. Haynes, Times Staff Writers
Smoking out the scofflaws who break one of 2004's new state laws should be easy to do. Security guards at major public buildings in California need only glance out the front door to see whether anyone is illegally puffing on a cigarette within 20 feet of the entryway. But most government buildings probably will rely on the honor system in enforcing the newly minted Statewide Smoke-Free Entryway Law, AB 846.
NEWS
February 25, 2001
Q The office manager and part-owner of the business where I work smokes constantly and is very defensive about it. She allows employees and customers to smoke in this Orange County warehouse. Isn't this a violation of the law? What government agency should I contact regarding such a violation? --E.B., Glendora * A California law prohibits smoking generally in enclosed places of employment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2000
I would like to commend Jerry Hicks for his column on smoking at the Revere House in Tustin. (Sept. 28) Nothing angers me more than when people use their position, power and influence to circumvent the law. It appears that Councilman Mike Doyle is able to ignore the ban on smoking with the blessing of Councilwoman Tracy Wills Worley, who claimed to be comfortable with the Police Department's enforcement program. In a letter written to me by Police Chief Steven Foster on Feb. 7, the chief said he had no intention of being smoke police.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2000 | JUDY SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
State legislation prohibiting smoking in workplaces might not apply to a Stanton nonprofit group's bingo games, concludes a city attorney's report issued last week. Whether a nonprofit group called the Kingsmen can legally permit smoking at its bingo games will depend on whether the operation employs independent contractors instead of paid employees, said Stanton City Atty. Gregory Diaz. State legislation bans smoking wherever there are paid employees, including bars and gambling operations.
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bars that flout California no-smoking laws should face the prospect of losing their liquor licenses, a state advisory board recommended Thursday. The state's Tobacco Education and Research Oversight Committee urged Gov. Gray Davis to direct the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to consider smoking violations when making bar licensing decisions.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2000
I would like to note some important points that were not mentioned in "Many Bars Fail to Keep Patrons From Lighting Up, Survey Finds" [Jan. 20]. The role of the county's public health department is to protect the health of all citizens, including workers who are exposed to deadly secondhand smoke through these bars and restaurants. California is one of only a few states to challenge the powerful tobacco lobby by enacting legislation like the Smoke-Free Workplace Law that provides a substantially healthier environment for employees and patrons of these establishments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1991
A pro-smoking group has filed a 30,000-signature petition to overturn a strict anti-smoking ordinance recently passed by the Long Beach City Council. If the petition is verified by the city clerk, it will go to the council, which will then have the choice of either rescinding the ordinance or placing it on the June, 1992, ballot. In the meantime, the ordinance will probably be suspended.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a year after the state banned smoking in bars, the Los Angeles City Council adopted an enforcement program Friday to make sure smokers and tavern owners keep the air clear. Bar owners will be required to post "no smoking" signs with a toll-free phone number that patrons can use to report violations. The number, (888) 333-0730, will connect callers to a new team of two fire inspectors assigned full time to respond to complaints and write citations.
NEWS
July 19, 1998 | JOHN SCHWARTZ, THE WASHINGTON POST
A federal judge has ruled that the Environmental Protection Agency wrongly declared secondhand tobacco smoke a dangerous carcinogen in a landmark 1993 report, a decision that could impact some local and regional ordinances banning indoor smoking. The controversial EPA report concluded that environmental tobacco smoke is a Class A carcinogen, as hazardous as radon and responsible for about 3,000 lung cancer deaths each year.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|