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Smoking Law

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1994 | SUSAN STEINBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Monica, long on the cutting edge of social experimentation, this week nearly turned the place where everybody knows your name into the place where nobody lets you smoke. The council was on the verge of joining only a few California cities in banning smoking in all indoor workplaces--including bars. Then a flicker of political reality set in. At least two council members were lobbied by Assemblyman Terry B.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1994 | MAIA DAVIS
Anti-smoking ordinances can be hazardous to the health of bingo fund-raisers, a Ventura citizens committee charged Tuesday. A group of about 10 Ventura residents, many of them dedicated smokers, gathered Tuesday on the steps of City Hall to propose loosening the city's anti-smoking ordinance. The self-appointed group declared that scientific research shows good ventilation systems can minimize the effects of secondhand smoke.
NEWS
September 29, 1994 | SIMON ROMERO
In response to a fire that ripped through a rental guest house, killing four people and injuring four others, the City Council unanimously passed an emergency ordinance requiring smoke detectors in all residential rental units. State law requires smoke detectors in all multifamily dwelling units, but the new city ordinance requires that detectors approved by the county fire marshal be installed and maintained in all rental units except those that are owner-occupied.
NEWS
September 15, 1994 | SUSAN STEINBERG
The City Council, heeding the concerns of restaurants and hotels, has backed away from restricting smoking in the city's 160 bars and restaurants as well as workplaces, portions of hotels and some outdoor areas. The council voted 4 to 1 against passing a measure that would have been one of the strictest anti-smoking ordinances in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1994 | RUSS LOAR
The twice-weekly bingo games sponsored by the Irvine Unified School District that raise nearly $50,000 a year for music programs, band uniforms and instruments are in trouble. A federal law requiring all public schools to be smoke-free by the end of the year has bingo operators warning that attendance will plummet if bingo players are not allowed to smoke. "It's going to be very difficult for them to continue the operation if they don't allow smoking," school district Supt. David E. Brown said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1994 | ALAN EYERLY
Tougher restrictions on public smoking are now being enforced in the city, less than five months before even stricter, statewide controls are to go into effect. Tustin's law bans smoking in any building owned, leased or operated by the city. Smoking in other indoor public places is also prohibited, except in areas specifically set aside for smokers. Local restaurants, therefore, can continue to offer smoking sections--at least through the end of the year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1994 | ALAN EYERLY
The City Council has tentatively approved stricter regulations on smoking in public, but the action has been superseded in large part by a measure signed into law Thursday by Gov. Pete Wilson. Wilson's office called the law the nation's toughest statewide anti-smoking law. Tustin still has the option of regulating smoking in workplaces not covered by the state law, which is scheduled to go into effect Jan. 1, 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1994 | J.E. MITCHELL
In an effort to better inform residents about the city's new smoking ordinance, Camarillo officials said a brochure describing the law should begin arriving in mailboxes across the city beginning Friday. The new ordinance was adopted early last month, but the city waited until a threatened petition drive failed before preparing the mailer, according to City Manager Bill Little. "We did not want to provide information to the public that would be out of date or completely irrelevant," Little said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1994 | LORETTA SCHERZ KELLER, Loretta Scherz Keller is a writer in Altadena.
As a smoker-quitter-smoker-again, I'd say it's time to throw some cold facts on the smoldering issue and try to keep emotion out of it for a change. Fact One: Smoking releases endorphins--those mind-boggling kinetic chemicals that most of us seek in our daily lives to get through this absurd world. That's even in the quit-smoke literature. It's what makes cigarettes pleasurable and addictive--excuse me, "habit-forming," as the industry moguls prefer to say.
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