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Smoking Rates

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NEWS
October 10, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
If smoking rates stay at current levels, smoking could create 18 million extra cases of tuberculosis worldwide and 40 million excess deaths from the disease by 2050, a study finds. Researchers produced mathematical models based on various smoking rate scenarios to estimate rates of tuberculosis disease and deaths in each World Health Organization region around the world. The baseline scenario used current smoking levels to come up with the 18 million and 40 million numbers; right now, almost 20% of people worldwide smoke tobacco, and that figure may rise in some poor countries, the study authors said.
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OPINION
January 10, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The 1964 U.S. Surgeon General's report on smoking - the first official acknowledgment by the federal government that smoking kills - was an extraordinarily progressive document for its time. It swiftly led to a federal law that restricted tobacco advertising and required the now-familiar warning label on each pack of cigarettes. Yet there was nothing truly surprising about the conclusion of the report. Throughout the 1950s, scientists had been discovering various ways in which smoking took a toll on people's health.
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NEWS
November 5, 1999 | From Associated Press
Despite years of anti-smoking campaigns, lawsuits and bans, the smoking rate among American adults has hardly budged during the 1990s--because more and more 18- to 24-year-olds are lighting up. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday that 24.7% of adults smoked in 1997. As a result, the CDC expects to fall far short of its goal of reducing smoking to 15% of the adult population by 2000.
SCIENCE
January 9, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Invasive lung cancer, still the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, claimed fewer lives over the five-year period ending in 2009, says a report issued Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Driven largely by the success of anti-tobacco campaigns, the decline in lung cancer was greater in men than in women, however. The grim result: a longstanding gender gap, in which women have lagged behind men in lung cancer rates, is narrowing. Fifty years after the U.S. surgeon general declared tobacco a hazard to the public's health, more than a million new cases of lung cancer were diagnosed from 2005 to 2009, according to the CDC's latest accounting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2003 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
California's smoking rates have dropped to record lows, state officials announced Friday. "Lots of folks said we wouldn't continue to see the declines," said Diana Bonta, director of the state Department of Health Services. "But our ... campaigns are working and the numbers continue to decline," she said. The announcement comes one day after two tobacco companies sued the state to stop it from airing anti-tobacco ads. The latest California Adult Tobacco Survey conducted by the state shows 16.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
I'm one of those non-smoking California types who has grown “allergic” to smoking. Can't stand to be around people who smoke, can't stand the way they stink up the joint, can't stand to look at an ashtray full of butts. The other day at a Santa Monica restaurant, the hostess seated a group next to my table and the whiff of tobacco - which came in on their clothes  - permeated the air like rancid perfume. It almost ruined the taste of my vegan lasagna. That is a crime in these parts.
OPINION
January 10, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The 1964 U.S. Surgeon General's report on smoking - the first official acknowledgment by the federal government that smoking kills - was an extraordinarily progressive document for its time. It swiftly led to a federal law that restricted tobacco advertising and required the now-familiar warning label on each pack of cigarettes. Yet there was nothing truly surprising about the conclusion of the report. Throughout the 1950s, scientists had been discovering various ways in which smoking took a toll on people's health.
NEWS
September 29, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Miners and people in the hotel and food service industry have the highest smoking rates, while those in education have the lowest, finds a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report on smoking prevalence in various professions. Data from the National Health Interview Survey found that overall the incidence of smoking was highest among those who didn't graduate high school, had no health insurance and lived below the federal poverty line. Smoking rates among all working adults surveyed was 19.6%.
NEWS
September 15, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Smoking rates have been declining across the United States -- and with them, so have lung cancer rates, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Men have been abandoning cigarettes at a steady clip over the last decade, with corresponding drops in the lung cancer rates -- 1.4% from 1999 to 2005, and 2.9% from 2005 to 2008. The West led the charge, with a decline of 3.9% in men's lung cancer incidence from 2006 to 2008. "Many of the states with the lowest lung cancer incidence, as well as smoking prevalence, were clustered in the West," the report said.
SCIENCE
January 9, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Invasive lung cancer, still the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, claimed fewer lives over the five-year period ending in 2009, says a report issued Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Driven largely by the success of anti-tobacco campaigns, the decline in lung cancer was greater in men than in women, however. The grim result: a longstanding gender gap, in which women have lagged behind men in lung cancer rates, is narrowing. Fifty years after the U.S. surgeon general declared tobacco a hazard to the public's health, more than a million new cases of lung cancer were diagnosed from 2005 to 2009, according to the CDC's latest accounting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Gay, lesbian and bisexual adults in Los Angeles smoke at a rate more than 50% higher than their straight counterparts and suffer disproportionately from the ill effects of tobacco use, health officials reported Thursday at the introduction of a new countywide campaign to stamp out the habit. The Break Up With Tobacco campaign is intended to sharply reduce smoking in the gay, lesbian and bisexual community, currently an estimated 20.6% in Los Angeles County, public health chief Dr. Jonathan Fielding said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
I'm one of those non-smoking California types who has grown “allergic” to smoking. Can't stand to be around people who smoke, can't stand the way they stink up the joint, can't stand to look at an ashtray full of butts. The other day at a Santa Monica restaurant, the hostess seated a group next to my table and the whiff of tobacco - which came in on their clothes  - permeated the air like rancid perfume. It almost ruined the taste of my vegan lasagna. That is a crime in these parts.
NEWS
January 28, 2013 | By Amina Khan
When it comes to preventable deaths and disease, smoking is still a top killer in the U.S., says a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Approximately 443,000 people die from cigarette smoking each year, and 8.6 million suffer from a serious illness related to smoking, according to the Tobacco Control State Highlights 2012. Utah claimed the lowest adult smoking rate of 11.8%, according to the report released last week, while Kentucky topped the charts with 29%. California hovered above Utah at 13.7%.
WORLD
December 12, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
DIEPSLOOT, South Africa - On the sunny side of a dusty township street, next to the metal gates of a school, Lucas Moyana's little shop is just a board propped on four plastic crates like a child's lemonade stand. For a couple of coins, he sells being cool, sells being free. A schoolboy in uniform hurries up, barely glancing at the cookie packets, lollipops and candies, grabs a Dunhill cigarette from a red box, puts a match to it and drops 22 cents on the table before hurrying away.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
While the lion's share of youth anti-smoking efforts has focused on cigarettes, a new report in the CDC journal Preventing Chronic Disease suggests more needs to be done to reduce the number of teens smoking flavored tobacco from hookahs. According to a recent survey cited in the report, 18.5% of 12th-grade students admitted to using a hookah in the previous year. And what's particularly concerning to the study authors, led by Daniel Morris of the Oregon Health Authority's public health division, is that many young people don't seem to recognize that hookah use carries serious health risks: Hookah smoke contains many of the same toxins as cigarettes and has been associated with a similar laundry list of diseases such as lung cancer and respiratory illness.
OPINION
June 8, 2012
Proposition 29, which would impose a $1-a-pack cigarette tax, is a deeply flawed initiative, and its defeat - which appears likely, though there are many ballots yet to be counted - would be a good thing for California. But even better for the state would be a new cigarette tax initiative that does it right. We urged voters to cast ballots against Proposition 29 because at a time when the state cannot afford to fulfill its most basic responsibilities, the initiative would have put most of the new revenue - more than $500 million a year - toward an entirely new agency and a new state function: the funding of disease research that already is relatively well funded by the federal government.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
The nation's war on smoking is faltering because, while overall tobacco use is dropping, the number of people who quit is being largely offset by the recruitment of 3,000 new smokers per day--most of them young. And as this is happening, a series of government research reports to be published today finds, the demographics of smoking are undergoing vast change and, by the turn of the century, tobacco use is expected to become overwhelmingly a habit of the poorly educated.
NEWS
November 18, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Happy Great American Smokeout Day! Thursday is the 35th annual day devoted to encouraging a smoke-free lifestyle. So it seemed like an opportune time to share the latest data on the smoking habits of American adults. According to data from the Minnesota Heart Survey , for which more than 3,000 people were interviewed six times between 1980 and 2009, smoking rates are on the decline. Fewer people are taking up the habit, and more people are kicking it, researchers found.
OPINION
March 4, 2012 | By Auden Schendler
In the 1970s it seemed like we had problems we could never fix - and I'm not talking about white polyester disco suits and the band Air Supply. The '70s presented America with the residue of a catastrophic war, soaring inner-city crime rates, runaway inflation and subjugation to Middle East oil. To punctuate the dismal vibe, everybody smoked, or so it seemed if you were sitting on an airplane at the edge of the DMZ between the smoking and nonsmoking sections,...
NEWS
November 16, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
How would you feel if the government told you that you couldn't smoke in your own car? Perhaps you'd endorse the idea that public health officials were trying to make it harder for people to maintain a habit that increases their risk of developing lung cancer, emphysema, heart disease and a host of other problems. Maybe you'd rejoice that you'd never again be forced to carpool to a meeting with a chain-smoking colleague. You might even breathe a sigh of relief for all the children of smokers who would be able to ride to school, soccer practice and piano lessons without being forced to inhale clouds of secondhand smoke.
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