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Smothers Brothers

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1989 | MILTON KENT, Baltimore Evening Sun
Dick and Tom Smothers have been carrying on the world's most famous brotherly quarrel since Cain and Abel locked horns lo those many years ago. And although most of America is by now wise to the fact that the Smothers Brothers really don't hate each other, Dick Smothers says that he and his brother are actually getting the last laugh. "When we get off a good show, Tommy and I look at each other and say, 'Well, fooled them again,' " Dick said recently. "If we had material, we'd be dangerous."
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
After nearly seven decades in the business, several Grammys and countless hit records in the 1960s such as "Downtown" and "I Know a Place," Petula Clark believes she's "beginning to get the hang" of singing. "I tell you what, I get more enjoyment out of it now," said Clark, who turned 81 on Friday. "I am singing better now. This is just a bit of luck. I don't do anything for it. I don't warm up. I just go out and sing. " The British singer recently returned from a tour of her homeland performing her classics, as well as tunes from her new CD, "Lost in You. " And she's heading for Australia next year.
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NEWS
April 12, 1990
Laugh to the antics of a sibling duo and support a worthy cause during "An Evening With the Smothers Brothers," 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Oxnard Civic Auditorium, 300 Hobson Way, Oxnard. Sponsored by Ventura County National Bank, the fifth annual "An Evening With . . ." event allocates all proceeds to charity. This year's recipient is Interface Children, Family Services of Ventura County, a nonprofit social services agency. Tickets are $20 and are available from the bank, at 656-4621.
NATIONAL
May 12, 2013 | John M. Glionna
On a nearly deserted downtown block, a small brick building fronted by a curvy neon sign heralds a bygone era here: That's when the big bombs went boom and awe-struck Las Vegas residents watched the mushroom clouds billow into the bright desert sky. At the start of the Cold War, in the 1950s and early 60s, people timed their days to watch the U.S. government's nuclear explosions at the nearby Nevada Test Site. Think of it as a small-town fair with 10,000-pound bombs serving as fireworks.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1988 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
It hardly seems possible that TV entertainers whose repertoire included asking Mr. Bunny whether or not Easter bunnies really lay Easter eggs would be considered so controversial that they would be yanked off the air. But that was what it was like in the sulfurous late '60s, when a spark in one place could ignite an atmosphere somewhere else, engulfing everyone in a conflagration of anxiety, suspicion and self-righteousness.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1988
Encouraged by the reception the Smothers Brothers got for their hourlong special two weeks ago, CBS on Tuesday ordered six more programs from the comedy duo for airing in weekly installments this spring. The Smothers Brothers series will debut March 28 in the time period that was to be occupied by "Magnum, P.I."--8 p.m. Wednesdays. "Magnum" by then will have completed its original episodes for the season, except for a special two-hour show that will mark the end of the detective series.
NEWS
August 16, 1990
With rubber-faced buffoon Tommy on guitar and long-suffering straight man Dick on double bass, the Smothers Brothers have for 32 years made sibling rivalry an art form. Friday and Saturday, the brothers return to the Good Time Theatre at Knott's Berry Farm, where they have performed twice before, most recently in 1985. "(The Good Time Theatre) is a nice room, an enjoyable room to play.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1988 | DON SHIRLEY
The Smothers Brothers, smothered by CBS 20 years ago, were all set to begin again with "The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour." Then the Writers Guild went on strike. The brothers nevertheless went ahead and patched together a show (debuting tonight at 8, Channels 2 and 8). It includes a statement of support for the goals of the striking writers. But it also includes some material that must have been written after the strike started.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1990 | MARK CHALON SMITH
Halfway through the Smothers Brothers' late show at Knott's Berry Farm Friday, Dick (in case you forgot, he's the one mom always loved best) tried to make a point with Tom (he's the one she didn't) about how comedy needs to keep evolving to stay fresh. As primly condescending to poor Tom as ever, Dick said vaudeville may have had them roaring years ago, but it might have them snoring today.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1993 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pat Paulsen knows as well as anyone about the capriciousness of fame. He was living in Orange, doing his comedy bit at a few local folk clubs and cleaning windows to make ends meet, when he got a call that not only put him in a featured spot on what was to become a top-rated TV series, but also led to a much-publicized (if facetious) run for the White House.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Al Gordon, an Emmy Award-winning comedy writer who spent much of his more than 40-year career writing for Jack Benny's penny-pinching, vain and perennially 39-year-old persona, has died. He was 89. Gordon died Wednesday of age-related causes at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, said his son, Neil. In a career that began after World War II and included writing for Eddie Cantor's radio show, Gordon soon teamed with comedy writer Hal Goldman . A few months after they met, they learned that Jack Benny needed new material for Rochester, the valet character played by Eddie Anderson on Benny's radio show.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2003 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
When the Hollywood Bowl kicks off its season Friday, it will be with a little bit of Broadway, a little bit of rock 'n' roll. Roger Daltrey, Patti LuPone and the Smothers Brothers will share the stage as inductees at the Fourth Annual Hollywood Bowl of Fame Gala.
NEWS
February 23, 2003 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
With the category count for tonight's Grammy Awards up to 101, you'd think the recording academy could add a few more without anyone noticing. So how about a new field saluting pop music on television, the medium that's delivered the awards show to the world for four decades? Here's a sampling of some moments that might have earned the honors. Sudden Impact Award: Appearances on "The Ed Sullivan Show" by Elvis Presley (1956-57) and the Beatles (1964). With the pre-cable U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2002 | Howard Rosenberg
A new documentary on the Smothers Brothers recalls just how lock-jawed much of television was years in advance of today's wildly careening speedway of instantaneous blather. The Who Brothers? A brief history: More than three decades before late-nighter Bill Maher was zinged for his hot-button comments about Sept. 11 terrorists on ABC, and long before the U.S. was wired for cable, folk-singing comedians Tommy and Dick Smothers were in weekly prime-time combat with censors at CBS.
TRAVEL
May 13, 2001
My husband is comedian Tommy Smothers, also known as "the dumb one" of the Smothers Brothers. Thank you for your insightful article about our beloved Sonoma ('Savoring the Sonoma Difference," April 1). You really captured the essence of our valley. We appreciate the mention of our winery, but I must also compliment you on the selection in your guidebook. Kenwood is our favorite restaurant--our clubhouse, really--and so often overlooked because of its commercial success. Most important, you conveyed the elegance of our casual, unpretentious, bluejeans lifestyle.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1997 | CARL GOTTLIEB, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Got an appetite for humor? Wade through the comedy club garden to sample the current crop of stand-up comics and you'll find the usual vegetables and nuts, with an occasional spicy treat sandwiched in among the bland, the boring and the gratuitously nasty. But for the advanced palate, there are more interesting places to look for laughs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1990 | LIBBY SLATE
The Smothers Brothers raised sibling rivalry to an art form, and for 32 years now, Tommy and Dick have been bickering at each other publicly, via television and regular concert tours. But to those who go to see the musical jokesters this weekend at Knott's Berry Farm's Good Time Theatre, don't expect to hear their classic "Mom Always Liked You Best!" routine of yore.
NEWS
April 24, 1988
My husband and I wanted to thank CBS for bringing the Smothers Brothers back to TV. It is so nice to have such a fun hour to watch on Wednesday nights. I am tired of all the crime shows these days, and I look forward to the Smothers on Wednesdays. Valerie Minoux, Laguna Hills
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Neil Sedaka may have been one of the first great rock songwriters, but as a performer, he is rooted in the vaudeville tradition of providing an energetic, entertaining presentation. On Friday, in the opening performance of a two-night run at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts, Sedaka sang, played piano, reminisced, told jokes and tossed in a few sprightly dance steps.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1993 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pat Paulsen knows as well as anyone about the capriciousness of fame. He was living in Orange, doing his comedy bit at a few local folk clubs and cleaning windows to make ends meet, when he got a call that not only put him in a featured spot on what was to become a top-rated TV series, but also led to a much-publicized (if facetious) run for the White House.
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