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Smuggling Afghanistan

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NEWS
March 22, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
The board of directors of the smugglers' bazaar sat cross-legged on pillows and prayer rugs, discussing the far-reaching impact on business of the rebel offensive in neighboring Afghanistan. As fierce fighting raged about 90 miles to the west, Haji Mohammed Yousef, the oldest and wisest of the shopkeepers in the Barra Smugglers' Bazaar, talked of refrigerators and television sets and the economics of one of the world's most lucrative smuggling routes.
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NEWS
March 22, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
The board of directors of the smugglers' bazaar sat cross-legged on pillows and prayer rugs, discussing the far-reaching impact on business of the rebel offensive in neighboring Afghanistan. As fierce fighting raged about 90 miles to the west, Haji Mohammed Yousef, the oldest and wisest of the shopkeepers in the Barra Smugglers' Bazaar, talked of refrigerators and television sets and the economics of one of the world's most lucrative smuggling routes.
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OPINION
April 25, 2004 | Anne-Marie Slaughter, Anne-Marie Slaughter is dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton and author of "A New World Order."
Was Sept. 11 George Bush's fault? Or Bill Clinton's? Or the CIA's? The desire for a scapegoat obscures a larger and more important point. The principal culprit in not preventing the Al Qaeda attacks wasn't a person or an administration; it was a mind-set. U.S. policymakers still employ a Cold War perspective in which the world is perceived primarily as a collection of nations.
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | JOHN POMFRET, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Eleven years ago, Sarajuddin Aryobi was a small-time merchant struggling with the family livestock business. Then the Soviet army entered Afghanistan and Aryobi struck it rich. Mohamad Fariq's transport business barely paid expenses in 1975. Thanks to the 12-year-old civil war between the Soviet-backed government and Muslim guerrillas, Fariq now owns 250 trucks. To celebrate his success, and display it, Fariq recently yanked out a front tooth and replaced it with a gold one.
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