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Smuggling Africa

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NEWS
April 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
West African police hunted today for a ship thought to be carrying scores of suspected child slaves that has been roaming off the coast for more than two weeks. Police in Benin's commercial capital, Cotonou, said they had alerted neighboring countries to prevent the ship's captain from disembarking its human cargo, believed to be 180 children sold by poor families.
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NEWS
April 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
West African police hunted today for a ship thought to be carrying scores of suspected child slaves that has been roaming off the coast for more than two weeks. Police in Benin's commercial capital, Cotonou, said they had alerted neighboring countries to prevent the ship's captain from disembarking its human cargo, believed to be 180 children sold by poor families.
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NEWS
August 3, 1987
A batch of enriched uranium has been smuggled into Sudan from an unidentified African country and is being offered for sale, Prime Minister Sadek Mahdi said. He told a news conference that authorities had seized 8.8 pounds of the material but that another 15.4 pounds had not been found. Rumors have circulated in Khartoum that merchants claiming to be from Zaire, a uranium producer, were offering about two pounds of enriched uranium for $400,000.
NEWS
August 3, 1987
A batch of enriched uranium has been smuggled into Sudan from an unidentified African country and is being offered for sale, Prime Minister Sadek Mahdi said. He told a news conference that authorities had seized 8.8 pounds of the material but that another 15.4 pounds had not been found. Rumors have circulated in Khartoum that merchants claiming to be from Zaire, a uranium producer, were offering about two pounds of enriched uranium for $400,000.
NEWS
June 18, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
After a passionate debate, the world's environmental leaders on Tuesday narrowly rejected a proposal to relax a ban on the trade of elephant ivory, although several African nations were preparing to renew their effort today. Tuesday's vote--at an international summit in Zimbabwe to revise the world's largest conservation treaty--pitted nation against nation in a three-hour session marked by emotional and bitter debate.
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