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December 23, 1999 | Bloomberg News
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Holdings Inc. said smuggling allegations leveled against it by the Canadian government relate solely to its former international affiliates. Canada on Tuesday filed suit against Winston-Salem, N.C.-based R.J. Reynolds seeking at least $1 billion, claiming the company smuggled cigarettes into the country to undercut a government plan to discourage smoking with high taxes. R.J. Reynolds said the companies at the core of Canada's case--R.J.
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BUSINESS
December 23, 1999 | Bloomberg News
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Holdings Inc. said smuggling allegations leveled against it by the Canadian government relate solely to its former international affiliates. Canada on Tuesday filed suit against Winston-Salem, N.C.-based R.J. Reynolds seeking at least $1 billion, claiming the company smuggled cigarettes into the country to undercut a government plan to discourage smoking with high taxes. R.J. Reynolds said the companies at the core of Canada's case--R.J.
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NEWS
February 8, 1995 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battle exploded onto the placid streets of suburban North York when metropolitan police here tried to question a 23-year-old man near an after-hours nightclub. The suspect pointed a pistol out of his car window and emptied it at pursuing officers. Then he pulled out a second gun and fired again. None of the officers was hurt. But the incident was seen here by many as evidence of the escalating level of criminal violence in Canada's cities.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1999 | From Associated Press
The government of Canada sued R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Holdings Inc. for $1 billion Tuesday, charging that it and related companies conspired to smuggle tobacco products into Canada to avoid millions of dollars in taxes. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Syracuse, N.Y., alleges the companies set up an elaborate network of smugglers and offshore companies to flood Canada with cheap cigarettes after the government doubled taxes and duties on tobacco in 1991.
NEWS
February 9, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Canada launched an offensive against rampant cigarette smuggling by lowering its federal tobacco taxes by at least one-third in a bid to eliminate smugglers' profits. The government also slapped a tax on tobacco exports to further discourage the billion-dollar trade in which duty-free export cigarettes are being smuggled back from the United States by Mohawk natives.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1999 | From Associated Press
The government of Canada sued R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Holdings Inc. for $1 billion Tuesday, charging that it and related companies conspired to smuggle tobacco products into Canada to avoid millions of dollars in taxes. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Syracuse, N.Y., alleges the companies set up an elaborate network of smugglers and offshore companies to flood Canada with cheap cigarettes after the government doubled taxes and duties on tobacco in 1991.
NEWS
May 29, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Authorities foiled a plan Saturday to smuggle 264 Asians, mostly members of the Tamil minority in Sri Lanka, to Canada aboard a ship, a police spokesman said. Police were looking for a 38-year-old Tamil suspected of organizing the trip, according to spokesman Bernd Metterhausen. The suspect, who was not identified, fled on foot as police closed in on his rented car. He is believed to have arranged a similar passage of Tamils to Canada nearly two years ago, Metterhausen told reporters.
NEWS
March 29, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
In its biggest crackdown on smuggling over the U.S. border, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police said it arrested 170 people and seized millions of dollars' worth of contraband liquor and tobacco. The suspects included members of a Montreal-area chapter of Hells Angels, as well as organized crime gangs run by Vietnamese and Chinese immigrants, the force said.
NEWS
September 9, 1991 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Welcome to Canada, where "cold turkey" has taken on a sensational new meaning for hard-pressed cigarette smokers. The Canadian government has taxed cigarettes to such levels that smokers have lately been known to drive across the border to the United States, buy a turkey, rip out its frozen innards in the supermarket parking lot, stuff the cavity with cheap American loose tobacco, and smuggle the bird back home.
NEWS
December 18, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Authorities were exploring possible terrorist motives Friday in the case of an Algerian-born man who allegedly entered Washington state from Canada on a ferry earlier this week with a deadly combination of explosives stashed in the wheel well of his rental car. Ahmed Ressam, 32, was charged Friday in U.S. District Court in Seattle with smuggling nitroglycerin and more than 100 pounds of other explosives into the United States from Canada and giving false information to U.S. customs agents.
NEWS
December 18, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Authorities were exploring possible terrorist motives Friday in the case of an Algerian-born man who allegedly entered Washington state from Canada on a ferry earlier this week with a deadly combination of explosives stashed in the wheel well of his rental car. Ahmed Ressam, 32, was charged Friday in U.S. District Court in Seattle with smuggling nitroglycerin and more than 100 pounds of other explosives into the United States from Canada and giving false information to U.S. customs agents.
NEWS
March 29, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
In its biggest crackdown on smuggling over the U.S. border, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police said it arrested 170 people and seized millions of dollars' worth of contraband liquor and tobacco. The suspects included members of a Montreal-area chapter of Hells Angels, as well as organized crime gangs run by Vietnamese and Chinese immigrants, the force said.
NEWS
February 8, 1995 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battle exploded onto the placid streets of suburban North York when metropolitan police here tried to question a 23-year-old man near an after-hours nightclub. The suspect pointed a pistol out of his car window and emptied it at pursuing officers. Then he pulled out a second gun and fired again. None of the officers was hurt. But the incident was seen here by many as evidence of the escalating level of criminal violence in Canada's cities.
NEWS
February 9, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Canada launched an offensive against rampant cigarette smuggling by lowering its federal tobacco taxes by at least one-third in a bid to eliminate smugglers' profits. The government also slapped a tax on tobacco exports to further discourage the billion-dollar trade in which duty-free export cigarettes are being smuggled back from the United States by Mohawk natives.
NEWS
September 9, 1991 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Welcome to Canada, where "cold turkey" has taken on a sensational new meaning for hard-pressed cigarette smokers. The Canadian government has taxed cigarettes to such levels that smokers have lately been known to drive across the border to the United States, buy a turkey, rip out its frozen innards in the supermarket parking lot, stuff the cavity with cheap American loose tobacco, and smuggle the bird back home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1989 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A native Aleut Indian teen-ager who lives in Cypress has gone into hiding, and reportedly has smuggled her 5-month-old daughter to a Canadian family for adoption rather than surrender the child to the Indian tribe. Bertram E. Hirsch, a New York attorney representing the tribe in its fight to place the baby with an Aleut family, said Jodi Argleben, 18, has given little Rebecca to a family in Vancouver, British Columbia, and has gone into hiding to avoid the ensuing tumult.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1989 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A native Aleut Indian teen-ager who lives in Cypress has gone into hiding, and reportedly has smuggled her 5-month-old daughter to a Canadian family for adoption rather than surrender the child to the Indian tribe. Bertram E. Hirsch, a New York attorney representing the tribe in its fight to place the baby with an Aleut family, said Jodi Argleben, 18, has given little Rebecca to a family in Vancouver, British Columbia, and has gone into hiding to avoid the ensuing tumult.
NEWS
August 16, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
The 155 Tamil refugees who were set adrift in two open boats off the Newfoundland coast came from West Germany and not from India as they had claimed in what was part of a smuggling ring masterminded by two Sri Lankans, authorities said Friday. West German police said the two ringleaders were under arrest and confessed that they had the Tamils ferried across the Atlantic in a German-owned, Honduras-registered tramp freighter after charging the Tamils $2,500 each.
NEWS
May 29, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Authorities foiled a plan Saturday to smuggle 264 Asians, mostly members of the Tamil minority in Sri Lanka, to Canada aboard a ship, a police spokesman said. Police were looking for a 38-year-old Tamil suspected of organizing the trip, according to spokesman Bernd Metterhausen. The suspect, who was not identified, fled on foot as police closed in on his rented car. He is believed to have arranged a similar passage of Tamils to Canada nearly two years ago, Metterhausen told reporters.
NEWS
August 16, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
The 155 Tamil refugees who were set adrift in two open boats off the Newfoundland coast came from West Germany and not from India as they had claimed in what was part of a smuggling ring masterminded by two Sri Lankans, authorities said Friday. West German police said the two ringleaders were under arrest and confessed that they had the Tamils ferried across the Atlantic in a German-owned, Honduras-registered tramp freighter after charging the Tamils $2,500 each.
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