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Smuggling Central America

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February 15, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The underground railroad that slipped millions of Central Americans across the U.S. border in the 1980s is now smuggling Asians and Africans desperate for a chance to reach the United States. Arriving in South America as tourists, they sneak through the Amazon jungle to Colombia--a country known for the quality of its counterfeiting--to obtain forged Central American visas. With those visas, they are less likely to be stopped along the way.
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NEWS
February 15, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The underground railroad that slipped millions of Central Americans across the U.S. border in the 1980s is now smuggling Asians and Africans desperate for a chance to reach the United States. Arriving in South America as tourists, they sneak through the Amazon jungle to Colombia--a country known for the quality of its counterfeiting--to obtain forged Central American visas. With those visas, they are less likely to be stopped along the way.
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NEWS
January 31, 1987 | Associated Press
A federal judge on Friday kept alive a lawsuit accusing two retired U.S. generals and top contra leaders of belonging to a ring that carried out assassinations, gunrunning and drug smuggling in Central America. Chief U.S. District Judge James L. King denied motions by nine of the 29 defendants to throw out the case because the accusations did not constitute violations of federal racketeering laws. "We're real pleased," said plaintiff Martha Honey, a journalist from San Jose, Costa Rica.
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