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Smuggling China

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NEWS
January 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Chinese police have arrested the alleged head of a human smuggling ring on suspicion that he arranged the passage of 58 Chinese found dead last June in the British port of Dover, the government's New China News Agency said. Chen Xiaokong was arrested Tuesday night at a disco in the southeastern province of Fujian. The news agency said Chen had not been seen since the bodies were discovered in the back of a tomato truck June 18.
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NEWS
January 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Chinese police have arrested the alleged head of a human smuggling ring on suspicion that he arranged the passage of 58 Chinese found dead last June in the British port of Dover, the government's New China News Agency said. Chen Xiaokong was arrested Tuesday night at a disco in the southeastern province of Fujian. The news agency said Chen had not been seen since the bodies were discovered in the back of a tomato truck June 18.
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NEWS
April 14, 1987 | Associated Press
Chinese authorities recovered the pelts of three giant pandas and detained several suspects in breaking up a smuggling ring, a Hong Kong newspaper reported Monday.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
A Harvard-educated lawyer, head of one of the nation's largest immigration asylum firms, and seven others were charged Wednesday with helping smugglers sneak scores of Chinese into the country. Porges, a Manhattan law firm, earned more than $13 million illicitly over the last seven years as it forged a relationship with Chinese smugglers, federal prosecutors alleged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1999
A Monterey Park woman has pleaded guilty to federal charges of conspiring with Asian organized crime syndicate members to smuggle Chinese nationals into the United States, sometimes extorting money from their relatives back home. Ai Qin Chen, 32, told U.S. District Judge Consuelo B. Marshall on Tuesday that the illegal immigrants were smuggled from China through Cambodia, Thailand and Brazil before being brought to the United States for about $30,000 a person.
NEWS
February 5, 1991 | Associated Press
Authorities in the Chinese city of Shanghai have smashed a major gold-smuggling ring and arrested 32 suspects, local press reports said Monday. The reports, which quoted the official China News Service, said the syndicate had smuggled more than 2,200 pounds of gold, worth about $25 million, into China in the last two years.
NEWS
January 27, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
China's top immigration official has been detained for questioning in a $10-billion smuggling scandal, government sources said. Xu Ganlu, 37, is a protege of Li Jizhou, the vice minister of public security who, sources say, was detained last year on corruption charges linked to the scandal. Meanwhile, Lin Youfang, the wife of Beijing's Communist Party boss, Jia Qinglin, denied involvement in the scandal.
NEWS
February 25, 1998 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Human rights activists said Tuesday that a thriving black market in body parts for transplantation has been illuminated by the arrests of two men on charges of trying to illegally sell organs from executed Chinese prisoners. The two men, Cheng Yong Wang--who told undercover investigators he had been a prosecutor on Hainan Island in China--and Xingqi Fu--a Chinese citizen living in New York--were seized after meeting with an FBI agent posing as a medical executive.
NEWS
September 19, 1998 | From Times staff and wire reports
An aging and rusty fishing boat crammed with 172 illegal immigrants from China living in filthy conditions was brought to a Navy base Friday, escorted by the U.S. Coast Guard. Federal health workers met the ship, the Chih Yung, at the dock at the 32nd Street Naval Station to give the immigrants medical care. The boat had been stopped by the Coast Guard three weeks ago 100 miles west of Baja California.
NEWS
June 21, 1993 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA and LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Tijuana smugglers were moving valuable goods: two dozen Chinese immigrants. Intercepted recently by U.S. Border Patrol agents as they crept through a crossing zone known as Goat Canyon, the smugglers yelled insults at the approaching agents in Spanish and yelled commands at the fleeing immigrants in Chinese. The multilingual smugglers serve as foot soldiers in the increasingly notorious global network behind the illegal influx of Chinese into the United States.
NEWS
September 7, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Pedro-bound ship planned an emergency stop in Alaska late Wednesday to investigate a pounding noise heard from a container deep within its hold. It is feared the noise came from one or more stowaways trapped inside. Crew members of the MV Manoa, en route from China and other points in Asia, said that they heard the pounding Sunday night during a power outage aboard the ship but had not been able to elicit any response from inside the 40-foot container since then.
NEWS
January 28, 2000 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Engaging in a remarkable bit of spin control on the biggest smuggling scandal in modern Chinese history, the Communist regime Thursday publicly denied reports that the wife of a Politburo member had been implicated by the investigation. A spokesman for China's State Council said that Lin Youfang, the wife of Beijing Communist Party boss and Politburo member Jia Qinglin, is living a free and comfortable life, despite widespread reports that she had been held for questioning.
NEWS
January 27, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
China's top immigration official has been detained for questioning in a $10-billion smuggling scandal, government sources said. Xu Ganlu, 37, is a protege of Li Jizhou, the vice minister of public security who, sources say, was detained last year on corruption charges linked to the scandal. Meanwhile, Lin Youfang, the wife of Beijing's Communist Party boss, Jia Qinglin, denied involvement in the scandal.
NEWS
January 22, 2000 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The biggest smuggling scandal ever to hit the People's Republic of China is unfolding in this ancient port city famed for its Old World atmosphere and swashbuckling past.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1999
A Monterey Park woman has pleaded guilty to federal charges of conspiring with Asian organized crime syndicate members to smuggle Chinese nationals into the United States, sometimes extorting money from their relatives back home. Ai Qin Chen, 32, told U.S. District Judge Consuelo B. Marshall on Tuesday that the illegal immigrants were smuggled from China through Cambodia, Thailand and Brazil before being brought to the United States for about $30,000 a person.
NEWS
September 19, 1998 | From Times staff and wire reports
An aging and rusty fishing boat crammed with 172 illegal immigrants from China living in filthy conditions was brought to a Navy base Friday, escorted by the U.S. Coast Guard. Federal health workers met the ship, the Chih Yung, at the dock at the 32nd Street Naval Station to give the immigrants medical care. The boat had been stopped by the Coast Guard three weeks ago 100 miles west of Baja California.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
A Harvard-educated lawyer, head of one of the nation's largest immigration asylum firms, and seven others were charged Wednesday with helping smugglers sneak scores of Chinese into the country. Porges, a Manhattan law firm, earned more than $13 million illicitly over the last seven years as it forged a relationship with Chinese smugglers, federal prosecutors alleged.
NEWS
January 28, 2000 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Engaging in a remarkable bit of spin control on the biggest smuggling scandal in modern Chinese history, the Communist regime Thursday publicly denied reports that the wife of a Politburo member had been implicated by the investigation. A spokesman for China's State Council said that Lin Youfang, the wife of Beijing Communist Party boss and Politburo member Jia Qinglin, is living a free and comfortable life, despite widespread reports that she had been held for questioning.
NEWS
February 25, 1998 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Human rights activists said Tuesday that a thriving black market in body parts for transplantation has been illuminated by the arrests of two men on charges of trying to illegally sell organs from executed Chinese prisoners. The two men, Cheng Yong Wang--who told undercover investigators he had been a prosecutor on Hainan Island in China--and Xingqi Fu--a Chinese citizen living in New York--were seized after meeting with an FBI agent posing as a medical executive.
NEWS
May 23, 1996 | JIM MANN and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal authorities began making a series of arrests Wednesday in an intensive investigation of China's two main state-controlled arms exporting companies for allegedly smuggling automatic assault weapons into this country, according to law enforcement officials. The companies under investigation, called Poly Technologies and Norinco, lie at the heart of China's military-industrial complex.
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