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Smuggling Cuba

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NEWS
March 26, 1997 | Reuters
U.S. customs agents arrested two men and seized more than 1,000 contraband Cuban cigars from a boat bound for Florida from Havana, authorities said Tuesday. Importing Cuban cigars is illegal under the U.S. economic boycott of the Communist-ruled island, but smuggling has increased dramatically because of the growing popularity of cigars in the United States.
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NEWS
January 5, 2001 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Convicted smuggler Joel Dorta Garcia sat inside the forbidding compound of Cuba's Department of State Security and showed little remorse while describing the journey that killed a man. Dorta was trying to outrun the Cuban Border Guard and reach U.S. waters in 1999 in an overloaded 32-foot Scorpion speedboat when the cap blew off a 200-gallon gas tank on deck. The 14 paying passengers screamed as gasoline soaked their legs. The seas were rough. There was no moon.
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NEWS
January 5, 2001 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Convicted smuggler Joel Dorta Garcia sat inside the forbidding compound of Cuba's Department of State Security and showed little remorse while describing the journey that killed a man. Dorta was trying to outrun the Cuban Border Guard and reach U.S. waters in 1999 in an overloaded 32-foot Scorpion speedboat when the cap blew off a 200-gallon gas tank on deck. The 14 paying passengers screamed as gasoline soaked their legs. The seas were rough. There was no moon.
NEWS
April 19, 1997 | From Associated Press
The leader of a group smuggling thousands of Cuban cigars into California was charged with illegally trading with an enemy of the U.S. government, federal officials said. Joseph Bruce Hybl, 41, and his girlfriend, Julie Ann Chatard, 35, were arrested Thursday. Each faces up to 15 years in prison if convicted. The arrests climaxed a federal investigation dubbed Operation Smoke Ring.
NEWS
July 7, 1993 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The recent seizure of three high-speed boats in Cuban waters and the slayings of three would-be defectors from Fidel Castro's regime has focused attention on what U.S. authorities admit is a long-overlooked and potentially lucrative trade--smuggling refugees into Florida. Smugglers in twin-engine racing vessels capable of outrunning Cuban patrols can make up to $10,000 for one 180-mile round trip between Key West and Cuba's north coast, according to U.S. Coast Guard officials.
NEWS
April 4, 1987 | Associated Press
Three men were indicted Friday for allegedly selling more than $1 million in sophisticated computer equipment to a company for shipment to Cuba, violating the U.S. Trading With the Enemy Act. "This should be the first of many cases like this down here," said Pat O'Brien, a U.S. Customs Service special agent in Miami. The 13-count indictment charges sales of more than $1 million worth of computers and related equipment in 1985 to Siboney International in Panama for shipment to Cuba.
NEWS
April 19, 1997 | From Associated Press
The leader of a group smuggling thousands of Cuban cigars into California was charged with illegally trading with an enemy of the U.S. government, federal officials said. Joseph Bruce Hybl, 41, and his girlfriend, Julie Ann Chatard, 35, were arrested Thursday. Each faces up to 15 years in prison if convicted. The arrests climaxed a federal investigation dubbed Operation Smoke Ring.
NEWS
July 20, 1989
Millionaire American fugitive Robert Vesco put the Cuban military into the cocaine smuggling business in 1985, NBC News reported. The network said that four high-ranking Cuban military officials who were executed last week after a summary trial received millions of dollars in drug bribes arranged by Vesco, who lives in Havana. Vesco, wanted for years in the United States on stock fraud and other charges, reportedly worked with the officers to set up an operation to smuggle U.S.
NEWS
August 3, 2001 | From Associated Press
Twenty-two Cubans rescued after their speedboat capsized will be brought to Florida, and two will be charged with smuggling illegal immigrants, a government official said Thursday. Five of the passengers are believed to have drowned. Twenty of the survivors are considered witnesses against the accused smugglers and will be allowed to remain in the United States after they testify, the Immigration and Naturalization Service official said, speaking on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
March 26, 1997 | Reuters
U.S. customs agents arrested two men and seized more than 1,000 contraband Cuban cigars from a boat bound for Florida from Havana, authorities said Tuesday. Importing Cuban cigars is illegal under the U.S. economic boycott of the Communist-ruled island, but smuggling has increased dramatically because of the growing popularity of cigars in the United States.
NEWS
July 7, 1993 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The recent seizure of three high-speed boats in Cuban waters and the slayings of three would-be defectors from Fidel Castro's regime has focused attention on what U.S. authorities admit is a long-overlooked and potentially lucrative trade--smuggling refugees into Florida. Smugglers in twin-engine racing vessels capable of outrunning Cuban patrols can make up to $10,000 for one 180-mile round trip between Key West and Cuba's north coast, according to U.S. Coast Guard officials.
NEWS
July 20, 1989
Millionaire American fugitive Robert Vesco put the Cuban military into the cocaine smuggling business in 1985, NBC News reported. The network said that four high-ranking Cuban military officials who were executed last week after a summary trial received millions of dollars in drug bribes arranged by Vesco, who lives in Havana. Vesco, wanted for years in the United States on stock fraud and other charges, reportedly worked with the officers to set up an operation to smuggle U.S.
NEWS
April 4, 1987 | Associated Press
Three men were indicted Friday for allegedly selling more than $1 million in sophisticated computer equipment to a company for shipment to Cuba, violating the U.S. Trading With the Enemy Act. "This should be the first of many cases like this down here," said Pat O'Brien, a U.S. Customs Service special agent in Miami. The 13-count indictment charges sales of more than $1 million worth of computers and related equipment in 1985 to Siboney International in Panama for shipment to Cuba.
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