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Smuggling Haiti

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NEWS
February 27, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In daylight, every 30 minutes or so, a tiny wooden rowboat makes a half-mile trip across the lake here. At night, the sound of oars slapping the water is replaced by the resonating roar of large trucks on the bordering road. The boats and trucks are carrying over the plasma that is keeping Haiti alive for the moment. The boats and trucks are smuggling gasoline from the Dominican Republic in open defiance of an international embargo designed to punish Haiti's military leaders.
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NEWS
August 24, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States plans to pay millions of dollars to Haitian black marketeers violating U.S.-designed sanctions so it can replace more than half a million gallons of petroleum stocks confiscated by the military regime from humanitarian groups, U.S. and private aid officials said Tuesday. Speaking of the humanitarian aid effort, which feeds almost 1 million Haitians and will run out of fuel within weeks, U.S.
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NEWS
August 3, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
Officials from the Dominican Republic said Tuesday that they have reached an agreement allowing an international force to patrol the country's border and prevent smuggling of fuel and other goods into Haiti. U.S. and Dominican officials said the mission will include more than 80 civilian and military personnel from the United States, Canada, Argentina and Brazil, expected to arrive within two weeks. Brazil, however, later denied that it will help staff the force.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
Officials from the Dominican Republic said Tuesday that they have reached an agreement allowing an international force to patrol the country's border and prevent smuggling of fuel and other goods into Haiti. U.S. and Dominican officials said the mission will include more than 80 civilian and military personnel from the United States, Canada, Argentina and Brazil, expected to arrive within two weeks. Brazil, however, later denied that it will help staff the force.
NEWS
July 12, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The morning haze hid them at first, but as the sun burned through they could be seen: three freighters waiting in the harbor to unload cargo sent here in violation of a U.S.-backed economic embargo. That same day, two more ships, sailing from Miami, docked at the northwestern Haitian port of Gonaives. They dropped off cosmetics, bicycles, tires and badly needed motor oil. It was the same story at the southern port of Petit Goaves.
NEWS
August 24, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States plans to pay millions of dollars to Haitian black marketeers violating U.S.-designed sanctions so it can replace more than half a million gallons of petroleum stocks confiscated by the military regime from humanitarian groups, U.S. and private aid officials said Tuesday. Speaking of the humanitarian aid effort, which feeds almost 1 million Haitians and will run out of fuel within weeks, U.S.
NEWS
February 9, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The bodies of four Haitians, including two children, washed up on the beach early Tuesday after smugglers apparently dropped off some 60 refugees along the central Florida coast. A U.S. Border Patrol spokesman said that a man, woman and two children--about 5 and 7 years old--apparently drowned in the morning darkness after they were let off the boat yards from shore. "It's a tragedy, but we've come to expect this," said Herbert Jefferson, Border Patrol assistant chief.
NEWS
May 13, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exemptions designed to help the suffering poor here survive tougher U.N. sanctions that take effect soon already are being subverted for "enormous profits" by the very targets of the international crackdown, diplomats and humanitarian aid experts say. Among the unintended benefactors are some of the richest, most powerful Haitian elite. They supported the 1991 coup that overthrew President Jean-Bertrand Aristide and have financially backed the military since.
NEWS
August 31, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton Administration won rhetorical backing from Caribbean republics Tuesday for an invasion of Haiti but came away virtually empty-handed in its attempt to sign up allies for military action to restore ousted Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to power. "Our governments are equally united in their determination to take all necessary means to carry out the (U.N.
NEWS
June 17, 1988 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Often maligned as a puppet of the dominant Haitian army, President Leslie F. Manigat emerged as a surprise winner Thursday following his first open clash with the military strongman who put him in office. Manigat explained at a news conference that he defied Gen. Henri Namphy, who ruled Haiti for two years following the exile of former dictator Jean-Claude (Baby Doc) Duvalier, for purely constitutional reasons.
NEWS
May 13, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exemptions designed to help the suffering poor here survive tougher U.N. sanctions that take effect soon already are being subverted for "enormous profits" by the very targets of the international crackdown, diplomats and humanitarian aid experts say. Among the unintended benefactors are some of the richest, most powerful Haitian elite. They supported the 1991 coup that overthrew President Jean-Bertrand Aristide and have financially backed the military since.
NEWS
February 27, 1994 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In daylight, every 30 minutes or so, a tiny wooden rowboat makes a half-mile trip across the lake here. At night, the sound of oars slapping the water is replaced by the resonating roar of large trucks on the bordering road. The boats and trucks are carrying over the plasma that is keeping Haiti alive for the moment. The boats and trucks are smuggling gasoline from the Dominican Republic in open defiance of an international embargo designed to punish Haiti's military leaders.
NEWS
February 9, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The bodies of four Haitians, including two children, washed up on the beach early Tuesday after smugglers apparently dropped off some 60 refugees along the central Florida coast. A U.S. Border Patrol spokesman said that a man, woman and two children--about 5 and 7 years old--apparently drowned in the morning darkness after they were let off the boat yards from shore. "It's a tragedy, but we've come to expect this," said Herbert Jefferson, Border Patrol assistant chief.
NEWS
July 12, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The morning haze hid them at first, but as the sun burned through they could be seen: three freighters waiting in the harbor to unload cargo sent here in violation of a U.S.-backed economic embargo. That same day, two more ships, sailing from Miami, docked at the northwestern Haitian port of Gonaives. They dropped off cosmetics, bicycles, tires and badly needed motor oil. It was the same story at the southern port of Petit Goaves.
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