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Smuggling Hong Kong

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August 18, 1990 | Reuters
Police seized goods worth $90,000 from 16 fishing boats they believe were bound for China and arrested 60 people on suspicion of smuggling, a government spokesman said Friday. Police also confiscated 120 television sets, 75 motorcycles, two taxis and many electrical appliances found during a search of the vessels late Thursday.
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NEWS
August 18, 1990 | Reuters
Police seized goods worth $90,000 from 16 fishing boats they believe were bound for China and arrested 60 people on suspicion of smuggling, a government spokesman said Friday. Police also confiscated 120 television sets, 75 motorcycles, two taxis and many electrical appliances found during a search of the vessels late Thursday.
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NEWS
September 30, 1989 | From Reuters
Customs officers seized 1,500 pounds of illegal raw ivory hidden in metal drums in a consignment from Singapore, a senior official said Friday. Local customs chief Law Wing Yuk said his men seized the ivory, along with 44 pounds of rhinoceros horn, during a search of the cargo in Hong Kong's Kwai Chung container port Wednesday. No arrests have been made. Imports of both are banned in Hong Kong following worldwide demands for the end of wholesale slaughter of elephants and rhinos.
NEWS
September 30, 1989 | From Reuters
Customs officers seized 1,500 pounds of illegal raw ivory hidden in metal drums in a consignment from Singapore, a senior official said Friday. Local customs chief Law Wing Yuk said his men seized the ivory, along with 44 pounds of rhinoceros horn, during a search of the cargo in Hong Kong's Kwai Chung container port Wednesday. No arrests have been made. Imports of both are banned in Hong Kong following worldwide demands for the end of wholesale slaughter of elephants and rhinos.
NEWS
August 10, 2000 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top cigarette makers, already engulfed in lawsuits over the health effects of smoking, are now facing a surge of legal attacks involving their role in cigarette smuggling, a global problem that experts say cheats governments out of tax revenues and promotes smoking by keeping supplies of cheap cigarettes on the market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The frightened Chinese immigrant spoke from his Mission Viejo hospital bed in broken English. "Who are you?" Zheng Kangxin, 32, finally managed as a telephoning reporter asked why he was with nine Latino immigrants in a van that was chased down recently in San Clemente by the U.S. Border Patrol. Injured when he jumped from the moving van and tried to run, Zheng apparently was so startled by the telephone call that he bolted from his hospital bed that same night--despite doctors' advice.
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