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Smuggling Iran

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An Iranian man and a Malaysian man pleaded guilty Tuesday to federal charges of attempting to buy and ship jet-fighter and missile parts to Iran. Saeed Homayouni, 38, and Yew Leng Fung, 40, attempted to buy parts for the F-4 Phantom, F-14 Tomcat, F-5 Tiger aircraft and the Hawk Missile System through the Bakersfield branch of a London company. The parts were to be shipped to Singapore, then Iran. Federal law prohibits selling military arms to Iran.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An Iranian man and a Malaysian man pleaded guilty Tuesday to federal charges of attempting to buy and ship jet-fighter and missile parts to Iran. Saeed Homayouni, 38, and Yew Leng Fung, 40, attempted to buy parts for the F-4 Phantom, F-14 Tomcat, F-5 Tiger aircraft and the Hawk Missile System through the Bakersfield branch of a London company. The parts were to be shipped to Singapore, then Iran. Federal law prohibits selling military arms to Iran.
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NEWS
July 23, 1989 | From Associated Press
Iranian authorities confiscated hundreds of silk carpets before they could be smuggled out of the country, then discovered the rugs were stuffed with jewelry, the official news agency said Saturday. The shipment of hand-woven carpets, the largest taken from smugglers in 10 years, was valued at tens of millions of dollars, and the jewelry was worth hundreds of thousands of dollars, the report said.
NEWS
July 17, 1995 | Reuters
Iranian officials have cracked down on illegal trade by arresting thousands of smugglers and seizing products ranging from meat mincers to satellite dishes, the IRNA news agency reported Sunday. A law enforcement public relations officer from Hormozgan said that 512 automobiles, 731 boats, 12,000 household appliances, televisions, recorders and radios were confiscated during the past three months. He said items included satellite dishes, vacuum cleaners, watches and calculators.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The owner of a Newport Beach firm and a company manager were indicted Thursday on charges of illegally exporting to Iran electronic testing and measuring equipment that could be used to develop missile guidance systems and nuclear weapons. Reza (Ray) Amiri, 43, an Iranian national and owner of Ray Amiri Computer Consultants, and Mohammed (Don) Danesh, 55, the firm's operations manager, were charged in a 17-count indictment in federal court in Los Angeles. The men were arrested Aug.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1993 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing the possibility of flight from legal charges, a federal judge on Tuesday postponed a decision on the bail release request of an Iranian charged with trying to illegally export a sophisticated computer to Iran. However, Judge George H. King set a bond of $50,000 for an Orange County man who is a co-defendant in the same case. The two defendants are Reza Zandian, 41, who maintains a residence in France, and Charles Reger, 57, of Huntington Beach. The two appeared in U.S.
NEWS
April 14, 1988 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
Four people, including two officials of Beechcraft West Germany and the president of an Arizona aviation firm, have been charged with illegally exporting sophisticated radar navigational systems to Iran, according to indictments unsealed Wednesday. The equipment was manufactured by San Diego-based Teledyne-Ryan Electronics, whose officials became suspicious of the purchasers and alerted the CIA, sparking an undercover sting operation that began in 1986 and was run by the U.S. Customs Service.
NEWS
July 17, 1995 | Reuters
Iranian officials have cracked down on illegal trade by arresting thousands of smugglers and seizing products ranging from meat mincers to satellite dishes, the IRNA news agency reported Sunday. A law enforcement public relations officer from Hormozgan said that 512 automobiles, 731 boats, 12,000 household appliances, televisions, recorders and radios were confiscated during the past three months. He said items included satellite dishes, vacuum cleaners, watches and calculators.
NEWS
June 30, 1987 | Associated Press
Iranian Revolutionary Guards smuggled two American hostages from Lebanon to Iran in coffins that traveled part of the way in an Iranian Embassy car, a Shia Muslim source said today. The source, who has been reliable in the past, told the Associated Press that the two American captives were "probably Terry Anderson and Thomas Sutherland." He said the two were taken to Iran in May. The source, who demanded anonymity, said the hostages were transported by way of Syria and Turkey.
NEWS
May 1, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
The independent counsel in the Iran- contra scandal is probing the U.S. Customs Service's failure to inspect a 358-ton shipload of smuggled arms unloaded in North Carolina last fall by associates of former National Security Council staff member Oliver L. North, Customs Commissioner William von Raab said Thursday. The Polish and Portuguese rifles, mines and bullets were part of a covert network of arms deliveries controlled by North and his associates, Richard V. Secord and Albert A.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1993 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing the possibility of flight from legal charges, a federal judge on Tuesday postponed a decision on the bail release request of an Iranian charged with trying to illegally export a sophisticated computer to Iran. However, Judge George H. King set a bond of $50,000 for an Orange County man who is a co-defendant in the same case. The two defendants are Reza Zandian, 41, who maintains a residence in France, and Charles Reger, 57, of Huntington Beach. The two appeared in U.S.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The owner of a Newport Beach firm and a company manager were indicted Thursday on charges of illegally exporting to Iran electronic testing and measuring equipment that could be used to develop missile guidance systems and nuclear weapons. Reza (Ray) Amiri, 43, an Iranian national and owner of Ray Amiri Computer Consultants, and Mohammed (Don) Danesh, 55, the firm's operations manager, were charged in a 17-count indictment in federal court in Los Angeles. The men were arrested Aug.
NEWS
July 23, 1989 | From Associated Press
Iranian authorities confiscated hundreds of silk carpets before they could be smuggled out of the country, then discovered the rugs were stuffed with jewelry, the official news agency said Saturday. The shipment of hand-woven carpets, the largest taken from smugglers in 10 years, was valued at tens of millions of dollars, and the jewelry was worth hundreds of thousands of dollars, the report said.
NEWS
April 14, 1988 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
Four people, including two officials of Beechcraft West Germany and the president of an Arizona aviation firm, have been charged with illegally exporting sophisticated radar navigational systems to Iran, according to indictments unsealed Wednesday. The equipment was manufactured by San Diego-based Teledyne-Ryan Electronics, whose officials became suspicious of the purchasers and alerted the CIA, sparking an undercover sting operation that began in 1986 and was run by the U.S. Customs Service.
NEWS
June 30, 1987 | Associated Press
Iranian Revolutionary Guards smuggled two American hostages from Lebanon to Iran in coffins that traveled part of the way in an Iranian Embassy car, a Shia Muslim source said today. The source, who has been reliable in the past, told the Associated Press that the two American captives were "probably Terry Anderson and Thomas Sutherland." He said the two were taken to Iran in May. The source, who demanded anonymity, said the hostages were transported by way of Syria and Turkey.
NEWS
March 6, 1988 | CECILIA LONNELL, Associated Press
Detective Hans Olvebro believes the identity of the gunman who killed Prime Minister Olof Palme is buried somewhere in the tons of documents or megabytes of computer data in police files. "I am an optimist. We have him somewhere in our material," said Olvebro, the third detective to lead the hunt since Palme was assassinated two years ago. But despite 16,000 tips and an $8.3-million reward, police acknowledge that they don't know much more about the killer or his motive than when they began.
NEWS
April 13, 1995 | ROBIN WRIGHT and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In defiance of the escalating U.S. campaign to tighten the squeeze on Iran, the Islamic republic is expanding its $5-billion global quest for arms to rebuild its arsenal, according to senior U.S. officials. The latest contact occurred in South Africa, where Iranian representatives in recent weeks have unsuccessfully explored the possibility of buying long-range artillery.
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