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Smuggling Iraq

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NEWS
January 30, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Law enforcement and intelligence agencies have detected more than 700 cases in which firms and individuals worldwide have attempted to sell munitions and other goods to Iraq, including at least 20 cases since August in the United States, government sources have told The Times. The efforts to circumvent the 5-month-old international embargo are believed to be continuing even in the midst of war--hostilities that pose greater dangers to smugglers, but also potentially higher profits.
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BUSINESS
February 27, 2002 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tobacco companies have violated a U.S. trade embargo for more than a decade by illegally sending billions of cigarettes into Iraq, the European Union has charged. The allegation is detailed in documents recently filed in federal court in Brooklyn, where the European Union has accused tobacco firms of evading hundreds of millions of dollars in taxes by taking part in a vast cigarette smuggling scheme. The Iraq charge focuses on two companies, R.J. Reynolds and Japan Tobacco Inc.
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NEWS
March 30, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. authorities accused the Iraqi government Thursday of masterminding an elaborate plot to smuggle electronic devices from California to Baghdad for eventual use in detonating nuclear weapons. Unsealing an indictment by a federal grand jury in San Diego against five alleged agents of the government in Baghdad, officials said they hope to extradite for prosecution in the United States the plot's alleged ringleader, Ali Ashour Daghir, and possibly other participants.
NEWS
April 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A ship smuggling thousands of tons of Iraqi oil sank in the Persian Gulf, a U.S. Navy official said, and authorities in Dubai said some of the fuel spilled into the water. Crews were trying to contain the spill more than 24 hours after the ship sank about 20 miles off the Dubai coast, an official at the Dubai Port Control said. Cmdr. Jeff Gradeck, a spokesman for the Navy's 5th Fleet, said the ship had 3,850 tons of fuel oil on board and had been intercepted several days earlier for violating U.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | From Reuters
British customs officers, who seized 40 nuclear triggers believed bound for Baghdad, have also uncovered a plot to smuggle restricted naval equipment to Iraq, a government source said Thursday. Press reports said that an Iraqi who was ordered deported because of the suspected nuclear plot was trying to get acoustic equipment used in underwater mines.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the seizure of nuclear weapons triggers from a plane bound for Baghdad, the State Department is trying to minimize damage to the U.S.-Iraq relationship by toning down official government criticism of President Saddam Hussein's regime. A Pentagon official said Friday that the State Department--alone among U.S.
NEWS
December 8, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A convoy of heavy trucks, their cargoes shrouded by tarpaulins, lined a road in the fenced duty-free zone east of the Jordanian refinery center at Zarqa recently. Many of the big rigs bore Iraqi license plates. On the Baghdad-Zarqa-Amman highway, tankers rolled westward through the desert, bringing in Iraqi crude oil. Diplomats in the Jordanian capital report that Iraqi trucks have been spotted around the southern port of Aqaba.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | Reuters
Some food is reaching Baghdad overland from Lebanon in violation of U.N. sanctions against Iraq, a Lebanese truck driver said Saturday. The driver, who asked not to be identified, said trucks were taking food such as rice and sugar from Christian East Beirut to Damascus, Syria, where the manifests were changed to show Jordan as the destination. When trucks reached Jordan, the manifests were again changed with Iraq put down as the final destination, he said.
NEWS
September 15, 1990
The U.N. sanctions against Iraq and the multinational armada enforcing them have succeeded in stopping virtually all of Iraq's exports of oil as well as most imports of bulk items. Smaller cargoes are harder to stop, and a complete halt to smuggling would be impossible. Some countries that are sympathetic to Iraq have already flown in food and medicines, permitted for "humanitarian purposes" under the U.N. resolution.
NEWS
February 17, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With the help of unscrupulous truck drivers, clandestine tramp steamers and compliant Iranian customs officials, Iraq has succeeded in selling between 80,000 and 100,000 barrels of oil a day, despite a U.N. economic embargo, Clinton Administration officials said Thursday. But they said the sales are a tiny fraction of Iraq's volume of 2.5 million barrels a day before the Gulf War.
NEWS
February 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
A former government official from Thailand and two businessmen pleaded guilty Thursday in a scheme to smuggle Iraqi oil. Surasak Nananukool, a former Thai deputy finance minister, pleaded guilty in federal court to a felony currency violation in a plea agreement. A more serious charge of conspiracy was dismissed as part of the agreement, which was signed in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California.
NEWS
July 3, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To aid Iraq's largest sanctions-busting operation, Iran has opened its strategic Qeys island for secret transfers of illicit Iraqi oil to ships that can evade a United Nations blockade, according to Clinton administration officials. Traffic has become so heavy in recent weeks that the regime of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein is smuggling as much as 100,000 barrels of oil a day, netting as much as $42 million a month that is being used in part to rebuild Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, U.S.
NEWS
June 6, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unexpected reversal, Iran has opened its protected sea lanes to dozens of ships carrying illegal shipments of Iraqi oil in violation of U.N. sanctions on Saddam Hussein's government, U.S. officials said Monday. The Clinton administration considers the about-face alarming because oil smuggling is Hussein's only major source of independent income. U.S. officials have estimated that unfettered access to Iranian waters could generate as much as $1 billion for his regime this year.
NEWS
October 21, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saddam Hussein's son and heir apparent, Uday, is pocketing hundreds of millions of dollars from a smuggling empire that illegally exports Iraqi oil and brings cigarettes and other goods into Iraq, according to a remarkable interview with his former personal secretary.
NEWS
February 17, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With the help of unscrupulous truck drivers, clandestine tramp steamers and compliant Iranian customs officials, Iraq has succeeded in selling between 80,000 and 100,000 barrels of oil a day, despite a U.N. economic embargo, Clinton Administration officials said Thursday. But they said the sales are a tiny fraction of Iraq's volume of 2.5 million barrels a day before the Gulf War.
NEWS
December 8, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A convoy of heavy trucks, their cargoes shrouded by tarpaulins, lined a road in the fenced duty-free zone east of the Jordanian refinery center at Zarqa recently. Many of the big rigs bore Iraqi license plates. On the Baghdad-Zarqa-Amman highway, tankers rolled westward through the desert, bringing in Iraqi crude oil. Diplomats in the Jordanian capital report that Iraqi trucks have been spotted around the southern port of Aqaba.
NEWS
April 5, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Three Iraqi nationals were indicted in Alexandria, Va., on charges of trying to smuggle $2.5 million in military electronics to the Saddam Hussein regime. The action followed an eight-month U.S. Customs Service sting featuring a front company that offered sophisticated military electronics to the three. Indicted were Anas Malik Dohan, Mohammed Zaid Jafar and his father, Zaid Jafar. Mohammed Zaid Jafar, who lives in Chevy Chase, Md., was arrested.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1991 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Marcos electronics company on Thursday denied claims by its former president that he was fired in April for his involvement in a U.S. Customs sting operation that foiled an Iraqi conspiracy to obtain nuclear trigger devices. Richard Testut, chief executive of CSI Technologies Inc., said the dismissal of Jerold Kowalsky resulted from "an accumulation of differences of opinion over a long period of time and was by no means connected with his involvement with the Iraqi thing."
BUSINESS
June 14, 1991 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Marcos electronics company on Thursday denied claims by its former president that he was fired in April for his involvement in a U.S. Customs sting operation that foiled an Iraqi conspiracy to obtain nuclear trigger devices. Richard Testut, chief executive of CSI Technologies Inc., said the dismissal of Jerold Kowalsky resulted from "an accumulation of differences of opinion over a long period of time and was by no means connected with his involvement with the Iraqi thing."
NEWS
April 5, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Three Iraqi nationals were indicted in Alexandria, Va., on charges of trying to smuggle $2.5 million in military electronics to the Saddam Hussein regime. The action followed an eight-month U.S. Customs Service sting featuring a front company that offered sophisticated military electronics to the three. Indicted were Anas Malik Dohan, Mohammed Zaid Jafar and his father, Zaid Jafar. Mohammed Zaid Jafar, who lives in Chevy Chase, Md., was arrested.
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