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Smuggling Japan

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BUSINESS
June 5, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this golf-crazy land, the Biggu Basa may be the ultimate American import success story. The Biggu Basa-- as the Japanese have dubbed the Big Bertha golf club made by Carlsbad, Calif.-based Callaway Golf Co.-- draws much praise here. "When you hit a ball that's on the ground, it's easy for it to go too low or off to the side.
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NEWS
March 1, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan is awash in boat people. Japanese law enforcement has been stunned by a sudden influx of illegal immigrants, mainly Chinese, Koreans, Pakistanis and other Asians who arrive in rickety fishing boats and sneak ashore in the middle of the night on deserted coastlines in western Japan. Police blame a new alliance between Chinese "snakeheads," members of syndicates that specialize in smuggling illegal immigrants into lucrative labor markets, and Japanese yakuza gangsters.
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NEWS
August 26, 1988
Smugglers used stolen or falsified export documents to ship more than 120,000 skins of a protected member of the alligator family into Japan in the past seven months, a wildlife protection organization said. Traffic Japan, the trade monitoring group of the World Wide Fund for Nature, said the smugglers shipped South American caiman skins by a complex route involving at least seven South American and Asian countries.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this golf-crazy land, the Biggu Basa may be the ultimate American import success story. The Biggu Basa-- as the Japanese have dubbed the Big Bertha golf club made by Carlsbad, Calif.-based Callaway Golf Co.-- draws much praise here. "When you hit a ball that's on the ground, it's easy for it to go too low or off to the side.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hoffman Sentenced for Illegal Exports: A Los Angeles scientist was sentenced to 2 1/2 years in federal prison for exporting classified computer programs used in "Star Wars" research and in satellites that detected Iraqi Scud missile launches during the Gulf War. Ronald J. Hoffman, 52, also was fined $225,000. He was convicted Feb. 24 on charges stemming from selling and exporting the computer software for more than $773,000 to four Japanese firms and to U.S.
NEWS
March 1, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan is awash in boat people. Japanese law enforcement has been stunned by a sudden influx of illegal immigrants, mainly Chinese, Koreans, Pakistanis and other Asians who arrive in rickety fishing boats and sneak ashore in the middle of the night on deserted coastlines in western Japan. Police blame a new alliance between Chinese "snakeheads," members of syndicates that specialize in smuggling illegal immigrants into lucrative labor markets, and Japanese yakuza gangsters.
MAGAZINE
October 9, 1994 | Marlowe Hood, Marlowe Hood is a Paris-based journalist. His last piece for the magazine covered the plight of illegal Chinese immigrants once they reach the United States
Jorge Guzman, a special agent for the Immigration and Naturalization Service, has a price on his head. It is his reward for snapping at the heels of one of the biggest, and most profitable, human smuggling operations in the world, a network that in turn fuels criminal enterprises from drug trafficking to credit card fraud, from prostitution to extortion. A broad man with a broad grin, Guzman wears his moods on his sleeve. Shielding himself behind the mask and monotone so typical of his law- enforcement colleagues is clearly an unnatural act. Nor does he suffer fools easily, on either side of the law--the grin can disappear in a flash.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hoffman Sentenced for Illegal Exports: A Los Angeles scientist was sentenced to 2 1/2 years in federal prison for exporting classified computer programs used in "Star Wars" research and in satellites that detected Iraqi Scud missile launches during the Gulf War. Ronald J. Hoffman, 52, also was fined $225,000. He was convicted Feb. 24 on charges stemming from selling and exporting the computer software for more than $773,000 to four Japanese firms and to U.S.
NEWS
August 26, 1988
Smugglers used stolen or falsified export documents to ship more than 120,000 skins of a protected member of the alligator family into Japan in the past seven months, a wildlife protection organization said. Traffic Japan, the trade monitoring group of the World Wide Fund for Nature, said the smugglers shipped South American caiman skins by a complex route involving at least seven South American and Asian countries.
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