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Smuggling Latin America

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NEWS
October 23, 1988 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
As archeologists announced the discovery last month of a spectacular find--dubbed the Peruvian King Tut--prosecutors in Los Angeles were working to keep artifacts from the same site off the black market. The find, announced by the National Geographic Society, was the tomb of a warrior priest from a culture long predating the Incas, which was described as perhaps the most significant site in all of American archeology.
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NEWS
February 1, 2000 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Cigarette giant British-American Tobacco encouraged and relied on smuggling to boost its sales in Latin America for at least several years, according to internal company memos in which senior executives discuss the role of smuggling in building market share and profits. The documents, dating from the early to mid-1990s, do not prove that employees of British-American, the world's second-largest tobacco company, directly took part in smuggling operations.
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NEWS
February 1, 2000 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Cigarette giant British-American Tobacco encouraged and relied on smuggling to boost its sales in Latin America for at least several years, according to internal company memos in which senior executives discuss the role of smuggling in building market share and profits. The documents, dating from the early to mid-1990s, do not prove that employees of British-American, the world's second-largest tobacco company, directly took part in smuggling operations.
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
As archeologists announced the discovery last month of a spectacular find--dubbed the Peruvian King Tut--prosecutors in Los Angeles were working to keep artifacts from the same site off the black market. The find, announced by the National Geographic Society, was the tomb of a warrior priest from a culture long predating the Incas, which was described as perhaps the most significant site in all of American archeology.
WORLD
June 9, 2011 | By Brian Bennett, Los Angeles Times
As drug cartels wreak murderous havoc from Mexico to Panama, the Obama administration is unable to show that the billions of dollars spent in the war on drugs have significantly stemmed the flow of illegal narcotics into the United States, according to two government reports and outside experts. The reports specifically criticize the government's growing use of U.S. contractors, which were paid more than $3 billion to train local prosecutors and police, help eradicate fields of coca, operate surveillance equipment and otherwise battle the widening drug trade in Latin America over the last five years.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2000 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In an effort to enhance its share of the vast and lucrative Asian cigarette market, British American Tobacco relied on a broad smuggling network in that region, internal company documents reveal. Company memos by senior BAT executives spanning a period from 1988 to 1996 contribute to an emerging picture of company-sanctioned smuggling as a global enterprise, apparently designed to circumvent cigarette taxes and boost market share by keeping prices low.
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