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Smuggling Pakistan

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NEWS
January 14, 1988
The State Department has concluded that Pakistan was probably involved in a plot to smuggle materials for nuclear devices out of the United States, but it is recommending that aid to Pakistan not be severed, Administration officials said. The findings were in a memorandum sent to President Reagan regarding the case of Arshad Z.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1993 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A federal jury in Los Angeles on Thursday convicted two men of illegally transporting and exporting hazardous chemical waste bound for Pakistan, the first conviction by a jury for this crime, according to federal prosecutors. The jury convicted Tariq Ahmad, 33, of Reno and Rafat Asrar, 38, of Irvine of violating the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Both men also were convicted of arson, conspiracy to commit arson, mail fraud and perjury. Ahmad was convicted of money laundering.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1987 | LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writer
In what was described as a major export violation case, a federal grand jury on Friday indicted a Southern California couple and a Hong Kong importer on charges of illegally shipping nearly $1 million in sophisticated electronic equipment to Pakistan. The indictments charge that the couple, Arnold I. and Rona K.
NEWS
January 14, 1988
The State Department has concluded that Pakistan was probably involved in a plot to smuggle materials for nuclear devices out of the United States, but it is recommending that aid to Pakistan not be severed, Administration officials said. The findings were in a memorandum sent to President Reagan regarding the case of Arshad Z.
NEWS
July 15, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
For more than six months, Arshad Z. Pervez, a Pakistan-born Toronto businessman, allegedly struggled to buy a quarter of a million dollars worth of special-purpose steel needed to make nuclear weapons. He allegedly haggled with a U.S. official over how big a bribe he would have to pay to export the metal to Pakistan. What Pervez did not know during the negotiations that started last November was that, at all times, he was dealing with undercover agents of the U.S.
NEWS
July 17, 1987 | Associated Press
The Pakistan government Thursday denied that it tried to import from an American company a type of steel used for making nuclear weapons and expressed concern that the issue would hurt ties with the United States. "Neither the government of Pakistan nor any of its agencies sponsored any violation of the export laws of the United States," a Foreign Ministry spokesman said. The spokesman, who cannot be identified under government rules, dismissed as baseless an allegation by Rep. Stephen J.
NEWS
July 19, 1987
An attorney representing a Los Angeles-area couple indicted on charges of exporting nearly $1 million in sophisticated electronic equipment to Pakistan vigorously denied Saturday that his clients were involved in illegal shipping. Arnold I. and Rona K. Mandel were indicted by a federal grand jury in Sacramento Friday, along with Leung Yiu Hung, a Hong Kong importer who is also known as Paul Leung.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1993 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A federal jury in Los Angeles on Thursday convicted two men of illegally transporting and exporting hazardous chemical waste bound for Pakistan, the first conviction by a jury for this crime, according to federal prosecutors. The jury convicted Tariq Ahmad, 33, of Reno and Rafat Asrar, 38, of Irvine of violating the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Both men also were convicted of arson, conspiracy to commit arson, mail fraud and perjury. Ahmad was convicted of money laundering.
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | JOHN POMFRET, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Eleven years ago, Sarajuddin Aryobi was a small-time merchant struggling with the family livestock business. Then the Soviet army entered Afghanistan and Aryobi struck it rich. Mohamad Fariq's transport business barely paid expenses in 1975. Thanks to the 12-year-old civil war between the Soviet-backed government and Muslim guerrillas, Fariq now owns 250 trucks. To celebrate his success, and display it, Fariq recently yanked out a front tooth and replaced it with a gold one.
OPINION
April 30, 2000 | Robin Wright, Robin Wright covers global issues for The Times and is the author of "The Last Great Revolution: Turmoil and Transformation in Iran."
Mazar Uddin is a 6-year-old with a head of dusty hair who was deposited at the Alla Auddin Orphanage more than a year ago. His mother, a young widow, left him at the rundown compound in the war-ravaged Afghan capital because she could no longer afford to keep her four sons, especially those who couldn't work. Uddin, the youngest, was the first to go. Alla Auddin is the only refuge for children in Kabul.
NEWS
July 19, 1987
An attorney representing a Los Angeles-area couple indicted on charges of exporting nearly $1 million in sophisticated electronic equipment to Pakistan vigorously denied Saturday that his clients were involved in illegal shipping. Arnold I. and Rona K. Mandel were indicted by a federal grand jury in Sacramento Friday, along with Leung Yiu Hung, a Hong Kong importer who is also known as Paul Leung.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1987 | LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writer
In what was described as a major export violation case, a federal grand jury on Friday indicted a Southern California couple and a Hong Kong importer on charges of illegally shipping nearly $1 million in sophisticated electronic equipment to Pakistan. The indictments charge that the couple, Arnold I. and Rona K.
NEWS
July 17, 1987 | Associated Press
The Pakistan government Thursday denied that it tried to import from an American company a type of steel used for making nuclear weapons and expressed concern that the issue would hurt ties with the United States. "Neither the government of Pakistan nor any of its agencies sponsored any violation of the export laws of the United States," a Foreign Ministry spokesman said. The spokesman, who cannot be identified under government rules, dismissed as baseless an allegation by Rep. Stephen J.
NEWS
July 15, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
For more than six months, Arshad Z. Pervez, a Pakistan-born Toronto businessman, allegedly struggled to buy a quarter of a million dollars worth of special-purpose steel needed to make nuclear weapons. He allegedly haggled with a U.S. official over how big a bribe he would have to pay to export the metal to Pakistan. What Pervez did not know during the negotiations that started last November was that, at all times, he was dealing with undercover agents of the U.S.
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