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Smuggling Paraguay

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March 31, 1987 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
The salesman, a hearty and doubtless trustworthy soul with slicked hair and a spiky mustache, caressed the Brazilian-made Volkswagen, his movements a patois without frontier: only a few hundred miles on the clock; nice color--good for the heat. A few weeks before, the station wagon had been sold new in Brazil for around $14,000. Asking price on the streets of Paraguay, which has never manufactured anything more road-worthy than an ox cart: $5,000.
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NEWS
May 16, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Col. Luis Gonzalez Rojas still wears his blue-green uniform with red trim and stars on the shoulders. But now he is an army outcast. Other officers shun him. Some would like to see him dead for what he did, Gonzalez Rojas says. "Do you think they wouldn't shoot me if they could?" he asks. "They can't because of public opinion, international opinion." What Gonzalez Rojas did was to expose army participation in Paraguay's mightiest underground institution: organized smuggling.
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NEWS
May 16, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Col. Luis Gonzalez Rojas still wears his blue-green uniform with red trim and stars on the shoulders. But now he is an army outcast. Other officers shun him. Some would like to see him dead for what he did, Gonzalez Rojas says. "Do you think they wouldn't shoot me if they could?" he asks. "They can't because of public opinion, international opinion." What Gonzalez Rojas did was to expose army participation in Paraguay's mightiest underground institution: organized smuggling.
NEWS
March 31, 1987 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
The salesman, a hearty and doubtless trustworthy soul with slicked hair and a spiky mustache, caressed the Brazilian-made Volkswagen, his movements a patois without frontier: only a few hundred miles on the clock; nice color--good for the heat. A few weeks before, the station wagon had been sold new in Brazil for around $14,000. Asking price on the streets of Paraguay, which has never manufactured anything more road-worthy than an ox cart: $5,000.
NEWS
February 5, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
A day after Gen. Alfredo Stroessner's fall in a violent coup, Paraguay's new leaders agreed Saturday to hold elections within 90 days open to all parties--including those that were banned during Stroessner's reign, the president of the ruling party said. Juan Ramon Chaves, named leader of the Colorado Party on Friday, told The Times that the new Cabinet and the party leadership both had approved the plan to hold quick elections after the coup.
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