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Smuggling Peru

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NEWS
August 26, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Authorities found 1,000 animals--some rare or endangered--packed in crates to be smuggled to Los Angeles. Among them were anacondas, black crocodiles and several rare species of frogs and turtles from Peru's Amazon jungle, police said. The animals, worth an estimated $500,000, were found Saturday in a warehouse at Lima's international airport, said the chief of the ecological police. About 350 of them were dead, apparently poisoned by a sedative, he said.
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NEWS
August 26, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Authorities found 1,000 animals--some rare or endangered--packed in crates to be smuggled to Los Angeles. Among them were anacondas, black crocodiles and several rare species of frogs and turtles from Peru's Amazon jungle, police said. The animals, worth an estimated $500,000, were found Saturday in a warehouse at Lima's international airport, said the chief of the ecological police. About 350 of them were dead, apparently poisoned by a sedative, he said.
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NEWS
October 21, 1989 | ROGER ATWOOD, REUTER
People here say they can't remember the last time they heard a bomb explode or saw a red flag with hammer and sickle dangling from a lamp post. While the rest of Peru slides ever deeper into leftist guerrilla violence, this city in the southernmost corner of the country has remained an outpost of tranquility. The reason? Contraband, residents say.
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | ROGER ATWOOD, REUTER
People here say they can't remember the last time they heard a bomb explode or saw a red flag with hammer and sickle dangling from a lamp post. While the rest of Peru slides ever deeper into leftist guerrilla violence, this city in the southernmost corner of the country has remained an outpost of tranquility. The reason? Contraband, residents say.
NEWS
October 12, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1602, Spanish settlers diverted the Moche River to make the waters eat away an ancient adobe pyramid and bare its riches. They found stunning treasures from an earlier Indian empire and, as was common practice, melted down the artifacts for the gold. In the 1960s, after three decades of pick-and-shovel looting in hundreds of thousands of graves in the Batan Grande burial ground, labor-intensive techniques gave way to mechanized robbery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1988 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
A federal grand jury is investigating suspected smuggling of pre-Columbian Peruvian artifacts into Southern California, federal prosecutors disclosed in court Wednesday. The investigation involves the activities of dealers and collectors on three continents, and focuses on the haul from a series of eight raids last March on individuals and businesses from San Luis Obispo to Los Angeles that yielded 1,137 suspected contraband art objects from 11 South and Central American countries.
NEWS
October 12, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1602, Spanish settlers diverted the Moche River to make the waters eat away an ancient adobe pyramid and bare its riches. They found stunning treasures from an earlier Indian empire and, as was common practice, melted down the artifacts for the gold. In the 1960s, after three decades of pick-and-shovel looting in hundreds of thousands of graves in the Batan Grande burial ground, labor-intensive techniques gave way to mechanized robbery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1988 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
A federal grand jury is investigating suspected smuggling of pre-Columbian Peruvian artifacts into Southern California, federal prosecutors disclosed in court Wednesday. The investigation involves the activities of dealers and collectors on three continents, and focuses on the haul from a series of eight raids last March on individuals and businesses from San Luis Obispo to Los Angeles that yielded 1,137 suspected contraband art objects from 11 South and Central American countries.
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