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Smuggling Russia

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NEWS
August 20, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As a top German official headed here with evidence of nuclear smuggling from Russia, specialists in both countries warned Friday that harsh finger-pointing at Moscow could undermine international efforts to secure its vast stockpiles of bomb-making materials.
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NEWS
September 27, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Truck driver Taimuraz Taimazov heats his spaghetti with a blowtorch. His kitchen table is a plank by the side of the road, and he sleeps in his cab in a long line of trucks parked near the Russian border. For the past five weeks, the trucker has been stuck in this narrow mountain pass in a dispute with his native Russia, but he never lacks for something to drink: He is hauling 30 tons of nearly pure alcohol.
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NEWS
September 27, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Truck driver Taimuraz Taimazov heats his spaghetti with a blowtorch. His kitchen table is a plank by the side of the road, and he sleeps in his cab in a long line of trucks parked near the Russian border. For the past five weeks, the trucker has been stuck in this narrow mountain pass in a dispute with his native Russia, but he never lacks for something to drink: He is hauling 30 tons of nearly pure alcohol.
NEWS
August 16, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wind lifts the nets drying on the beach. A caviar poacher's rowboat has been pulled up on the hot sand. Muscles gleam on a fisherman's bare shoulders, and his pale, watchful eyes reflect the dance of the tides. Magomed the smuggler limps down the beach in southern Russia where he has come, most days this year, to buy supplies for his underworld trade: basins of gleaming black fish eggs, straight from the slashed belly of the sturgeon.
NEWS
August 18, 1994 | MARJORIE MILLER and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin has written to German Chancellor Helmut Kohl promising Moscow's cooperation in investigating recent cases of nuclear contraband seized in Germany, a Bonn spokesman said Wednesday. The letter was the first direct offer of help from the Russian government, which has publicly denied German assertions that Russia is the source of nuclear materials seized in Germany over the last four months. The two leaders are friends, and Kohl had written to Yeltsin last weekend.
NEWS
December 20, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More than six pounds of weapons-grade uranium believed to have come from Russia has been seized and three men arrested, Czech police said in Prague. It wasn't enough uranium to build an atomic bomb, an International Atomic Energy Agency spokesman said, but the seizure underlined concerns about dangerous materials being smuggled out of the former Soviet Union.
NEWS
December 28, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 48 hours, the two Russians and their Belarussian accomplice holed up in the dreary border town of Brest, waiting for two contacts from Poland to show up. To kill time and the autumn chill, the trio opened a bottle of vodka and began a round-the-clock drinking party. When the Poles arrived in the city of 238,000 in western Belarus, the Russians produced the lead capsule they had stolen from a top-secret installation 1,200 miles to the east. The Poles examined it.
NEWS
August 23, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of last week's plutonium scare, Russia and Germany agreed Monday to boost their joint efforts to prevent nuclear smuggling, but they failed to determine whether the atomic contraband captured in Munich actually originated in Russia.
NEWS
August 16, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wind lifts the nets drying on the beach. A caviar poacher's rowboat has been pulled up on the hot sand. Muscles gleam on a fisherman's bare shoulders, and his pale, watchful eyes reflect the dance of the tides. Magomed the smuggler limps down the beach in southern Russia where he has come, most days this year, to buy supplies for his underworld trade: basins of gleaming black fish eggs, straight from the slashed belly of the sturgeon.
NEWS
August 28, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The heirs of KGB counterintelligence said Thursday they had practically covered their entire annual budget by foiling large-scale criminal schemes to spirit metals, petroleum, timber and other strategic resources out of Russia to the West. An official of the Security Ministry called the ministry's most successful operation yet a "graphic example" of how a successor agency to the KGB, still regarded warily by many citizens, can help secure a prosperous, law-abiding Russia.
NEWS
December 20, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More than six pounds of weapons-grade uranium believed to have come from Russia has been seized and three men arrested, Czech police said in Prague. It wasn't enough uranium to build an atomic bomb, an International Atomic Energy Agency spokesman said, but the seizure underlined concerns about dangerous materials being smuggled out of the former Soviet Union.
NEWS
August 25, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian security officials, adding weight to promises that they would work harder to stop nuclear smuggling, announced Wednesday that they recovered more than 22 pounds of uranium stolen from a closed nuclear center. The uranium-238 is not weapons-grade and Atomic Energy Ministry spokesman Georgy Kaurov said the material is so harmless it could best be used as a weight for a fishing lure or "to make presses for buckets of sauerkraut."
NEWS
August 23, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of last week's plutonium scare, Russia and Germany agreed Monday to boost their joint efforts to prevent nuclear smuggling, but they failed to determine whether the atomic contraband captured in Munich actually originated in Russia.
NEWS
August 20, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As a top German official headed here with evidence of nuclear smuggling from Russia, specialists in both countries warned Friday that harsh finger-pointing at Moscow could undermine international efforts to secure its vast stockpiles of bomb-making materials.
NEWS
August 18, 1994 | MARJORIE MILLER and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin has written to German Chancellor Helmut Kohl promising Moscow's cooperation in investigating recent cases of nuclear contraband seized in Germany, a Bonn spokesman said Wednesday. The letter was the first direct offer of help from the Russian government, which has publicly denied German assertions that Russia is the source of nuclear materials seized in Germany over the last four months. The two leaders are friends, and Kohl had written to Yeltsin last weekend.
NEWS
August 14, 1994 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
German police have made their third and largest seizure this year of weapons-grade nuclear material apparently smuggled from the former Soviet Union for sale on the world black market, officials said Saturday. Bavaria state police in Munich confirmed reports by the weekly magazines Der Spiegel and Focus that they confiscated a stash of highly enriched plutonium hidden in the suitcase of a passenger on a Lufthansa flight from Moscow on Wednesday.
NEWS
August 25, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian security officials, adding weight to promises that they would work harder to stop nuclear smuggling, announced Wednesday that they recovered more than 22 pounds of uranium stolen from a closed nuclear center. The uranium-238 is not weapons-grade and Atomic Energy Ministry spokesman Georgy Kaurov said the material is so harmless it could best be used as a weight for a fishing lure or "to make presses for buckets of sauerkraut."
NEWS
August 14, 1994 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
German police have made their third and largest seizure this year of weapons-grade nuclear material apparently smuggled from the former Soviet Union for sale on the world black market, officials said Saturday. Bavaria state police in Munich confirmed reports by the weekly magazines Der Spiegel and Focus that they confiscated a stash of highly enriched plutonium hidden in the suitcase of a passenger on a Lufthansa flight from Moscow on Wednesday.
NEWS
December 28, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 48 hours, the two Russians and their Belarussian accomplice holed up in the dreary border town of Brest, waiting for two contacts from Poland to show up. To kill time and the autumn chill, the trio opened a bottle of vodka and began a round-the-clock drinking party. When the Poles arrived in the city of 238,000 in western Belarus, the Russians produced the lead capsule they had stolen from a top-secret installation 1,200 miles to the east. The Poles examined it.
NEWS
August 28, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The heirs of KGB counterintelligence said Thursday they had practically covered their entire annual budget by foiling large-scale criminal schemes to spirit metals, petroleum, timber and other strategic resources out of Russia to the West. An official of the Security Ministry called the ministry's most successful operation yet a "graphic example" of how a successor agency to the KGB, still regarded warily by many citizens, can help secure a prosperous, law-abiding Russia.
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