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Smuggling South Africa

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BUSINESS
April 21, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hoffman Sentenced for Illegal Exports: A Los Angeles scientist was sentenced to 2 1/2 years in federal prison for exporting classified computer programs used in "Star Wars" research and in satellites that detected Iraqi Scud missile launches during the Gulf War. Ronald J. Hoffman, 52, also was fined $225,000. He was convicted Feb. 24 on charges stemming from selling and exporting the computer software for more than $773,000 to four Japanese firms and to U.S.
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NEWS
July 8, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They carry AK-47 assault rifles. They once firebombed a marine-conservation patrol boat. When authorities in one small town got tough, they stormed the police station. They have even placed a bounty on a police dog that sniffs packages at the Cape Town airport. What's all the danger about? Narcotics? Diamonds? Armaments?
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NEWS
July 8, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They carry AK-47 assault rifles. They once firebombed a marine-conservation patrol boat. When authorities in one small town got tough, they stormed the police station. They have even placed a bounty on a police dog that sniffs packages at the Cape Town airport. What's all the danger about? Narcotics? Diamonds? Armaments?
BUSINESS
April 21, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hoffman Sentenced for Illegal Exports: A Los Angeles scientist was sentenced to 2 1/2 years in federal prison for exporting classified computer programs used in "Star Wars" research and in satellites that detected Iraqi Scud missile launches during the Gulf War. Ronald J. Hoffman, 52, also was fined $225,000. He was convicted Feb. 24 on charges stemming from selling and exporting the computer software for more than $773,000 to four Japanese firms and to U.S.
NEWS
November 4, 1986 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
A 28-year-old white woman pleaded guilty to treason charges here Monday, admitting that she planted bombs at three South African police stations and was trained as a guerrilla by the outlawed African National Congress. The woman, Marion M. Sparg, a former Johannesburg journalist who left the country in 1981 to join the African National Congress, said in a letter read into the court record that she has no regrets about her actions.
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